NCAA investigating improper conduct in Nevin Shapiro case, good news for Frank Haith


The NCAA has announced that they will be investigating potential improper conduct that occurred during their investigation of Miami and former booster Nevin Shapiro.

Here are the basics, from the NCAA’s release:

Former NCAA enforcement staff members worked with the criminal defense attorney for Nevin Shapiro to improperly obtain information for the purposes of the NCAA investigation through a bankruptcy proceeding that did not involve the NCAA.

But there’s more to it than that.

In a teleconference on Wednesday afternoon, NCAA president Mark Emmert said that former NCAA investigators worked with Shapiro’s attorney to improperly subpeona and depose witnesses in the bankruptcy case. What’s more, the NCAA may have had Shapiro’s attorney on their payroll, only no one actually approved it. They realized it when the bill showed up and people started asking questions.

“Obviously this is a shocking affair,” Emmert said.

The NCAA will be investigating their own investigation into NCAA violations, which Emmert said should take between seven and ten days, and no more than two weeks. But the big news is that the organization “will not be issuing notices of allegation until after this investigation is concluded.”

“We want to make sure that any evidence that is brought forward is appropriately collected and has the integrtity that we expect and demand,” Emmert said. If it wasn’t obtained properly, it will be thrown out.

Much of this investigation centers around the Miami football program, but there is also a lot at stake for Missouri head coach Frank Haith and his former staff at Miami. Shapiro alleged that he paid $10,000 to the family member of DeQuan Jones, a top 25 recruit that Haith landed while with the Hurricanes, and that the money was returned to Shapiro by Haith’s assistants.

CBSSports.com had reported on Monday that Haith was set to receive a Notice of Allegations this week, and that he would be charged with unethical conduct and a failure to promote an atmosphere of compliance because the NCAA believed that he was lying to them. The punishment could have resulted in a multi-year show-cause penalty and, potentially, have cost Haith his job.

We shall see if this is finding by the NCAA is simply a stay of execution, or if the mistakes made during the investigation could result in Haith being cleared of the accusations.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Louisville’s Rick Pitino on allegations: ‘We will get through this’

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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) Louisville coach Rick Pitino remains defiant that his program will survive the allegations in a book by an escort alleging that former Cardinals staffer Andre McGee hired her and other dancers to strip and have sex with recruits and players.

Pitino said Tuesday that the Cardinals “will get through this the right way.”

The coach told a packed room at a tipoff luncheon that he understands the motivation behind Katina Powell’s book “Breaking Cardinal Rules: Basketball and the Escort Queen,” but questions the need for the alleged activities given the talent his program has produced.

Pitino added, “We will find out the truth, whatever it may be, and those responsible will pay the price.”

Georgia Tech lands Class of 2016 guard

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Georgia Tech picked up its third Class of 2016 commitment on Tuesday as the Yellow Jackets landed a pledged from three-star guard Josh Okogie.

The 6-foot-4 guard is considered the No. 143 overall prospect in the national Class of 2016 rankings and Okogie played with a very talented Team CP3 in the Nike EYBL. In 22 games this spring and summer, Okogie averaged 10.6 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.6 steals per game while shooting 45 percent from the field.

Okogie joins three-star wing Christian Matthews and four-star big man Romello White in head coach Brian Gregory’s Class of 2016 at Georgia Tech. The group is definitely a solid influx of talent with some coming from successful grassroots programs.