Could the NCAA’s latest gaffe create a change to enforcement practices?

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The NCAA suffered yet another embarrassing blow on Wednesday as it was revealed that they may have botched the seemingly-ironclad case that Charles Robinson and Yahoo! handed them involving Miami booster Nevin Shapiro.

You can find more details about the NCAA investigation into violations that occurred during an NCAA investigation of possible NCAA violations — That sentence just about sums it up, dontcha think? — and how it could affect current Missouri and former Miami coach Frank Haith here, but in short: the NCAA got access to bankruptcy proceeding they weren’t supposed to get access to, and they did so while Shapiro’s attorney was billing them for work he did.

This is yet another embarrassment for the NCAA’s enforcement staff. It wouldn’t be a stretch to say that one of the main reasons Shabazz Muhammad was only forced to sit out threes games this season was because of a conversation that was overheard on a plane where the boyfriend on an investigator was bragging about how Shabazz would never be allowed to play. That occurred just days before a judge ruled that the investigation into for USC football coach Todd McNair was “malicious” and “over the top”.

And based on what NCAA president Mark Emmert said on a teleconference on Wednesday afternoon, it may be the last time we see an investigation go this way.

“I’m very concerned about it,” Emmert said of the recent problems involving the NCAA’s investigative arm. “The reality is there is alwasys going to be criticisms of an enforcement process. When it comes to credibility and integrity, we have to make sure that it absolutely is at the forefront of mind in all of these activities. When you have several issues that call that into question, you have to pause and make sure you have those things right.”

Emmert has called in an outside law firm to review the NCAA’s investigation. He’ll also be asking that law firm to review the NCAA’s enforcement processes as a whole.

“I’ll ask this firm also to continue their work to look into whether or not we have similar problem of any kind in the enforcement operation and the broader regulatory role,” he said. “It’s the whole regulatory envirooment that needs to operate in a way that gives us great confidence, and right now that isn’t the case.”

He’s saying the right things.

The NCAA has a major PR problem if their investigations into improper conduct involve their own improper conduct. How can anyone trust that anything the NCAA does is above board after watching them repeatedly backtrack over recent months? The majority of the people that are paying attention believe that the NCAA’s current structure is a joke, and they aren’t helping themselves at all with black eyes like this continually popping up.

You have to think that something is going to change as a result of this news.

But we’ve thought that the NCAA has to change the way they handle rules violations for a long time. Why would things be any different now?

Perhaps the best question to ask is this: Why now? From CBSSports.com’s Bruce Feldman:

As CBSSports.com reported in September, the NCAA came to South Florida on Dec. 19, 2011 — the day that former Miami assistant equipment man Sean Allen testified after having been subpoenaed in Shapiro’s federal bankruptcy case. Allen told CBS that he spotted NCAA investigator Ameen Najjar in the room. Allen requested that Najjar be removed from the room. The NCAA investigator was told to leave, but clearly Najjar and the NCAA had been working with Shapiro’s attorney.

So the NCAA was tagging along with Shapiro’s attorney back in Dec. of 2011, but it took until the week that the Notice of Allegations were supposed to be released for the NCAA to realize they did something wrong? Who found out about the fact that the NCAA paid Shapiro’s attorney? Did someone get into the NCAA’s ear? Were lawsuits threatened?

Will that be enough to get the NCAA to make changes?

Because I can’t imagine how much longer the schools are going to be willing to put up with this kind of thing for much longer.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

 

USC lands four-star 2018 guard Elijah Weaver

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USC landed an important commitment for its future on Monday night as four-star Class of 2018 guard Elijah Weaver.

Regarded as the No. 35 overall prospect in the Rivals’ national Class of 2018 rankings, the 6-foot-5 Weaver gives the Trojans a floor leader to build around for the future as he provides great size in the backcourt. Capable of playing multiple guard spots, Weaver has a lot of upside for a program that has done a very solid job of developing backcourt talent under head coach Andy Enfield.

Weaver’s commitment is also important for the Trojans because it comes despite the looming FBI investigation that the program is dealing with thanks to former assistant coach Tony Bland. USC had recently lost a four-star commitment from forward J’Raan Brooks, so the commitment of Weaver is a huge momentum boost for them as they get right back on track in the Class of 2018.

With Weaver in the mix, USC now owns three four-star pledges in the 2018 class as he joins four-star forward Taeshon Cherry and four-star guard Kevin Porter.

Jim Larranaga believes he’s ‘Coach-3’ in FBI investigation

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Despite losing key contributors Davon Reed and Kamari Murphy from last season’s NCAA tournament team, the Miami Hurricanes are expected to be a player both within the ACC and nationally this season. But instead of having the focus solely on the likes of JaQuan Newton, Bruce Brown and Lonnie Walker, Jim Larrañaga’s program is also having to deal with the impact of the ongoing FBI investigation into corruption and fraud in college basketball.

While no one connected to the Miami men’s basketball program was arrested last month, the program is referenced in the FBI report. On Monday, Larrañaga stated during a press conference that he believes that he is “Coach-3” in the FBI report. Larrañaga also maintained his innocence, saying that he had done nothing wrong while also being thankful that none of his assistant coaches were involved.

“It’s been a strain, physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually,” Larrañaga said according to the Palm Beach Post. “It’s something that’s there. I have to deal with it. I have the support of my wife and a wonderful family. I have the support of the university, my staff and players.”

According to the FBI report, “Coach-3” requested that payments totaling $150,000 be funneled to “Player-12” in order to ensure his commitment to their university. It has been reported that “Player-12” was 2018 five-star prospect Nassir Little, who has also stated that he had done nothing wrong. Two of the schools recruiting Little at the time, Arizona and Miami, have been entangled in the FBI investigation to varying degrees.

While Miami has not had anyone connected to its program arrested, Arizona assistant coach Emmanuel “Book” Richardson was one of the four Division I coaches were were indicted. As a result Little removed both Arizona and Miami from consideration before ultimately committing to North Carolina earlier this month.

There’s no telling what the FBI investigation will ultimately uncover, which for the schools involved could take a heavy toll not only for the 2017-18 season but for future years as well. The FBI case has been comparatively quiet since the first set of indictments, with future moves likely to be influenced by what authorities learn from the ten individuals named in the first announcement.

Miles Bridges discusses being offered money during recruiting process

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With the FBI launching an investigation into corruption and fraud in college basketball last month, the entire sport has found itself under the microscope. Ten people, including four Division I assistant coaches, were arrested and there’s no telling just how long the FBI’s investigation will last or what information it will produce.

Michigan State forward Miles Bridges is considered by many to be the leading candidate for national Player of the Yeah honors, and he had the opportunity to turn pro after a good freshman season. But Bridges made the decision to return to East Lansing, and with that comes questions as to why he would do that as opposed to cashing in on his NBA potential as soon as possible.

In an interview with Brendan Quinn of The Athletic (subscription required) Bridges discussed a host of issues, including being offered money by people while going through the recruiting process.

“I mean, if you get caught, that might be the end of your career. I wanted to play in college really bad,” Bridges told Quinn. “I don’t know — materialistic things, they don’t really get to me. So when people were offering me money, I would say no right away, because I wanted to be able to live out my college experience. But really, I don’t know, it is hard, especially because I was so young at the time — 17.”

Given the ongoing investigation, high-profile players and teams will be on the receiving end of increased scrutiny even if they aren’t part of the FBI probe. It’s an unfair situation for a player like Bridges to deal with, as even in the actual cases of alleged wrongdoing the players themselves are essentially commodities whose services are being auctioned as opposed to the main characters looking to cash in.

Unfortunately, due to recent events a decision like the one made by Bridges will result in some questioning whether or not the player received something from the school or another entity/individual. And that’s a tough — and unfair — thing for a young player to have to deal with.

Broken hand sidelines North Carolina PG Joel Berry II

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North Carolina’s defense of its national title will likely begin without its most important player, as it was announced on Monday that senior point guard Joel Berry II will miss approximately four weeks due to a broken bone in his right hand.

Berry started at the point each of the last two seasons, earning Most Outstanding Player honors in April as the Tar Heels defeated Gonzaga to win the national title. As a junior, Berry averaged 14.7 points, 3.6 assists and 3.1 rebounds per game and started 37 of the 38 games in which he played. Berry shot 42.6 percent from the field and 38.3 percent from three, with the latter percentage being the best on team amongst players who attempted at least two three-pointers per game.

Berry was named an NBC Sports Preseason Third-Team All-American in late September.

With Berry out of the lineup, North Carolina loses its floor general as well as one of their top perimeter shooters. Sophomore Seventh Woods and freshman Jalek Felton become more important options at the point as a result of Berry’s injury, and the team doesn’t lack for perimeter shooters either with Cameron Johnson, Brandon Robinson, Kenny Williams and freshman Andrew Platek all being capable of helping to pick up the slack.

North Carolina opens its regular season on November 10 against Northern Iowa.

Bill Self’s stance on Kansas/Missouri series remains unchanged

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Sunday afternoon in Kansas City, bitter rivals Kansas and Missouri got together on the basketball court for the first time since 2012, with the Showdown for Relief raising $1.75 million for recent hurricane victims. In what was an entertaining game, the Jayhawks won by the final score of 93-87 with point guard Devonté Graham leading the way for the winners with 25 points and ten rebounds.

Kansas finished the game with five players in double figures, including Mississippi State transfer Malik Newman (17 points) and center Udoka Azubuike (16). On the other side freshman Michael Porter Jr. paced four Tigers in double figures with 21 points while younger brother Jontay grabbed a game-high 12 rebounds off the bench.

However despite the excitement for the two rivals being on the same court in any capacity, Sunday’s meeting was different given the circumstances. Following the game Kansas head coach Bill Self was asked about the possibility of the two teams meeting in a regular season game, and he maintained the stance he’s held since Missouri left the Big 12 for the SEC.

“I’m not going to say never, but I don’t think there’s been any change in our position as far as the university goes,” Self said following Sunday’s exhibition. “I’m the spokesman, I guess, on this but trust me, I’m not the only one that feels that way.”

While it would certainly benefit college basketball if Kansas and Missouri were to renew acquaintances down the line, it is understandable that Self — and maybe some others on the Kansas side of things — would have reservations. The programs, even with the arrival of Cuonzo Martin in Columbia and the freshman class led by the aforementioned Michael Porter Jr., are in different places right now.

The Jayhawks have their sights set on a 14th consecutive Big 12 title and a run at their first national title since 2008, Missouri is looking to fast-track a rebuilding process after struggling mightily under former head coach Kim Anderson. Yet with that being said, the state of the two athletic departments during realignment likely has more to do with the teams not playing each other.

Missouri was a school with options earlier this decade before joining the SEC, but that was not the case for Kansas. Had the Big 12 broken up as some believed would be the case, where would the Jayhawks have landed? Fortunately for the school the Big 12 survived the realignment craze, losing four schools (Missouri and Texas A&M to the SEC, Colorado to the Pac-12 and Nebraska to the Big Ten) and adding TCU and West Virginia to get their membership number to ten.

Given that, the best bet for college basketball fans who want to see this rivalry played during the regular season may be to hope for the programs wind up in the same in-season tournament. Even better, how about the same NCAA tournament region?