Could the NCAA’s latest gaffe create a change to enforcement practices?


The NCAA suffered yet another embarrassing blow on Wednesday as it was revealed that they may have botched the seemingly-ironclad case that Charles Robinson and Yahoo! handed them involving Miami booster Nevin Shapiro.

You can find more details about the NCAA investigation into violations that occurred during an NCAA investigation of possible NCAA violations — That sentence just about sums it up, dontcha think? — and how it could affect current Missouri and former Miami coach Frank Haith here, but in short: the NCAA got access to bankruptcy proceeding they weren’t supposed to get access to, and they did so while Shapiro’s attorney was billing them for work he did.

This is yet another embarrassment for the NCAA’s enforcement staff. It wouldn’t be a stretch to say that one of the main reasons Shabazz Muhammad was only forced to sit out threes games this season was because of a conversation that was overheard on a plane where the boyfriend on an investigator was bragging about how Shabazz would never be allowed to play. That occurred just days before a judge ruled that the investigation into for USC football coach Todd McNair was “malicious” and “over the top”.

And based on what NCAA president Mark Emmert said on a teleconference on Wednesday afternoon, it may be the last time we see an investigation go this way.

“I’m very concerned about it,” Emmert said of the recent problems involving the NCAA’s investigative arm. “The reality is there is alwasys going to be criticisms of an enforcement process. When it comes to credibility and integrity, we have to make sure that it absolutely is at the forefront of mind in all of these activities. When you have several issues that call that into question, you have to pause and make sure you have those things right.”

Emmert has called in an outside law firm to review the NCAA’s investigation. He’ll also be asking that law firm to review the NCAA’s enforcement processes as a whole.

“I’ll ask this firm also to continue their work to look into whether or not we have similar problem of any kind in the enforcement operation and the broader regulatory role,” he said. “It’s the whole regulatory envirooment that needs to operate in a way that gives us great confidence, and right now that isn’t the case.”

He’s saying the right things.

The NCAA has a major PR problem if their investigations into improper conduct involve their own improper conduct. How can anyone trust that anything the NCAA does is above board after watching them repeatedly backtrack over recent months? The majority of the people that are paying attention believe that the NCAA’s current structure is a joke, and they aren’t helping themselves at all with black eyes like this continually popping up.

You have to think that something is going to change as a result of this news.

But we’ve thought that the NCAA has to change the way they handle rules violations for a long time. Why would things be any different now?

Perhaps the best question to ask is this: Why now? From’s Bruce Feldman:

As reported in September, the NCAA came to South Florida on Dec. 19, 2011 — the day that former Miami assistant equipment man Sean Allen testified after having been subpoenaed in Shapiro’s federal bankruptcy case. Allen told CBS that he spotted NCAA investigator Ameen Najjar in the room. Allen requested that Najjar be removed from the room. The NCAA investigator was told to leave, but clearly Najjar and the NCAA had been working with Shapiro’s attorney.

So the NCAA was tagging along with Shapiro’s attorney back in Dec. of 2011, but it took until the week that the Notice of Allegations were supposed to be released for the NCAA to realize they did something wrong? Who found out about the fact that the NCAA paid Shapiro’s attorney? Did someone get into the NCAA’s ear? Were lawsuits threatened?

Will that be enough to get the NCAA to make changes?

Because I can’t imagine how much longer the schools are going to be willing to put up with this kind of thing for much longer.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.


Bill Self on Cheick Diallo: ‘It may be a couple of more weeks’

2015 McDonald's All American Game
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Cheick Diallo is currently practicing with Kansas, but his eligibility still remains in question.

On Monday, Kansas head coach Bill Self appeared on “The Border Patrol” on WHB-AM 810 and was asked to update the status of his freshman big man.

“He’s been cleared to practice,” Self told hosts Steven St. John and Nate Bukaty. “(His status) is depending on what they find throughout from the information we submit to them whenever we get it all together.

“A lot of people think, ‘Well, why wouldn’t it all be together?’ Well there’s a lot of reasons why. It’s because they told us recently some things that they just wanted. Instead of just throwing it to them piece by piece, they requested we to just submit it all together, so it may be a couple of more weeks before we’re able to submit everything when you’re talking about getting information from schools in Mali and everything like that.

“But we hope in two weeks, maybe three weeks, before we have a definite answer. But right now, Cheick is like everybody else. He’s practicing.”

Diallo, a 6-foot-9 forward from Mali is allowed to practice with the Jayhawks, but has been waiting to be cleared by the NCAA Eligibility Center despite enrolling in classes over the summer and earning six credits. Self anticipated this would be a long process, but has remained confident Diallo, the top-5 recruit in Class of 2015, will eventually be cleared to play this season.

For three years, Diallo attended Our Savior New American School in Centereach, New York, which is currently under NCAA review. In September, Pitt freshman Damon Wilson, Diallo’s teammate at OSNA, was cleared to play.

Kansas opens the season on Nov. 13 against Northern Colorado.

Albany’s Peter Hooley accepts Inspiration Award

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Last week, Albany senior Peter Hooley accepted the Inspiration Award at the Coaches vs Cancer Basket Ball in Troy, New York. The Albany athletic department uploaded his entire speech on Monday afternoon.

Hooley had one of the most uplifting moments of March after months and months of heartache.

The junior guard missed three weeks of the season to travel back home to Australia to be with his mother, who was battling colon cancer. She passed away in January. Hooley returned to the team in February and the following month, the Great Danes had a shot at an NCAA tournament berth. In the America East Tournament championship, Hooley sunk a game-winning shot with 1.6 seconds to go.

Hooley, who graduated in May, was selected to give the commencement speech.