screen-shot-2012-07-11-at-12-30-29-pm

Report: DC high schooler, top 150 recruit Junior Etou lied about his age

5 Comments

Junior Etou is a 6-foot-7 forward that plays at Bishop O’Connell in Arlington, VA, after transferring into the program from Arlington Country Day school in Jacksonville, FL. He’s ranked as the 142nd overall player, according to Rivals, and has offers from the likes of Kansas, Maryland, Miami and West Virginia.

The addition of Etou has helped O’Connell — a school that counts, among others, Kendall Marshall as an alum — erase the memories of a 14-18 season a year ago and regain status as one of the nation’s elite programs.

That’s all great, until you consider a fact that Dave McKenna, a sports columnist for the City Paper in DC writing for Deadspin, brought up on Tuesday afternoon: Etou, a native of the Congo, is 20 years old:

Junior Etou’s full name is Luc Tselan Tsiene Etou. He is originally from the Republic of Congo. Turns out that in 2009, Luc Tselan Tsiene Etou played for the Congo Republic national team in the FIBA Africa Championship in Tripoli and Benghazi. The roster for that tournament lists Etou’s hometown as Pointe Noire, the second-largest city in the Republic, and his birth date as “4 June 1992.” That would make him 20 years old, not 18.

He’s also on the roster for the Congo Republic team that participated in the Africa U18 Championship in May 2010, which shows Etou’s birthday as “04/06/1992.”

And in August 2010, Etou is listed among the participants in a Basketball Without Borders camp in Dakar, where the entry under his name shows “Date of Birth: 4/6/1992.”

All those events were overseen by FIBA, basketball’s international governing body. Via email from the Geneva-based group’s headquarters, a FIBA spokesman says that “according to our database,” the June 4, 1992, birthday for Etou is accurate. For every FIBA-sanctioned event, the spokesman says, the national federation of each participating country must provide FIBA “with all necessary eligibility information such as copy of passport(s), birth registry, etc.”

That’s a problem.

You can’t be 20 years old and play high school basketball.

Making the story all the more suspect is that in January of 2011, Etou’s Wikipedia page was changed to say that he was born in 1994 instead of 1992. The location of the IP address that made those edits? Jacksonville, the same city that is home to Etou’s old high school, Arlington Country Day.

Deadspin is on fire when it comes to outing athletes that lie.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

POSTERIZED: Pensacola State’s Jamal Thomas dunks through block attempt, makes coach go nuts

Leave a comment

A solid poster dunk went down in the junior college ranks last night as Pensacola State sophomore Jamal Thomas finished a dunk through a block attempt against Northwest Florida State.

The 6-foot-3 Thomas used his power and momentum to go through the opposing shot blocker and the play made his head coach, Pete Pena, go nuts with an over-exaggerated fist pump. The video is short, but be sure to watch for Pena’s reaction near the logo at the top right of the screen.

VIDEO: Boise State robbed of insane, buzzer-beating win on incorrect timing by officials

Screen Shot 2016-02-11 at 1.07.34 AM
Leave a comment

It looked like James Webb III of Boise State had hit the season’s craziest buzzer-beater.

With 0.8 seconds left, he caught an in-bounds pass on the run on the right wing, hoisted up a prayer of a three and watched as it banked it as the buzzer sounded.

It’s pretty fantastic:

And it also clearly left his hands before time expired, but there was a reason for that. According to the officials, the clock (for the road team, mind you) did not start when the ball was caught.

They were right.

Where they were wrong was determining that it took more than a second for Webb to catch and release the shot, meaning that they were wrong to waive off the bucket.

This awesome slo-mo clip of the shot from Matt Stephens of the Coloradoan is all the evidence I need, but if you need more, Sportscenter anchor Scott Van Pelt clocked it at 0.7 seconds:

The game would go to overtime, where Colorado State would go on to win, 97-93.

As you can imagine, Boise State players and coaches were livid with the call.

“I hope it’s not a situation where you get an apology later but don’t get the win. I don’t understand it,” head coach Leon Rice said in a radio interview after the game. “I hope they got it right somehow, some way. I don’t know. It didn’t look right to me, but I’m not the official.”

This comes just four days after officials blew a call in a game between New Mexico and San Diego State that allowed the Aztecs to force overtime and eventually beat the Lobos. (That call may have determined the outcome of the Mountain West regular season title, to boot.)

New Mexico was essentially told, “my bad”, but the league as a result.

And Boise State will probably get the same treatment despite the fact that, if the league determines that the referees botched this call as well, the tame technically was over then.

Will they have the guts to award the Broncos a road win that they earned and deserve?

I doubt it.

UPDATE: Here’s a statement from the officiating crew: