Frank Haith

Report: Frank Haith, Miami to be served with notice of allegations from NCAA


The University of Miami, and former Miami coach/current Missouri coach Frank Haith, will be served with a notice of allegations from the NCAA, according to’s Jeff Goodman.

The news comes as part of the aftermath from an investigation into former Hurricane booster Nevin Shapiro, who is currently serving time in prison for finanacial crimes and told’s Charles Robinson in August 2011 about various payments and benefits he gave Miami athletes in his time in connection with the university.

Haith, who is in his second year with the Tigers, is expected to be charged with unethical conduct and failure to promote an atmosphere of compliance, along with his former staff at Miami — Jake Horton, Michael Schwartz and Jorge Fernandez — according to the report.

Haith’s charges could lead to a multiple-year show-cause penalty, Goodman also reported.

That’s the biggest problem for Haith and Missouri at this point. I highly doubt that the Tigers are in any danger of having what happened in Coral Gables blow back on them. That’s unheard of, really. But would Mizzou be able to keep him after all this? Especially if the show-cause goes past, say, two years. As Goodman points out, former Tennessee coach Bruce Pearl got five years for lying to the NCAA about hosting a recruit at a barbecue at this home.

That’s the one thing I’m worried about if I’m Haith. My job security. Most of the infractions had to do with the football team, which is where the investigation was focused to begin with. However, it’s not easy to shake any allegations that come from the NCAA, in terms of keeping whatever job you have, when they have to do with a major investigation.

Also, what will happen to Morton, Fernandez and Schwartz? The program’s those coaches are at are safe as well, I’d imagine — Horton is a Western Kentucky, Schwartz at Fresno State, no word on where Fernandez is now — but with the amount of accusations and charges about to be levied on a bunch of former and current Hurricane staffers, players and officials, I’d assume they get some sort of retroactive punishment as well.

The charges stem from Shapiro’s accusations that Haith and his staff paid Shapiro with money from a basketball camp. Haith told the NCAA that the money went to his assistants.

From Goodman’s report:

However, Haith will be charged with unethical conduct because the NCAA did not believe his story that payments to his assistants intended for camp money did not wind up going to repay Shapiro, who made the allegations to Yahoo Sports back in August of 2011. A source said that the money was delivered to Shapiro’s mother — who verified the payment to the NCAA.

The failure to promote an atmosphere of compliance stems from “impermissible airline travel that was given to the family of two players from a member of his staff and also the interaction between Shapiro and players while on visits” Goodman wrote.

Those involved in the case have up to 90 days to respond.

So what does Missouri do if all goes according to the NCAA’s plan? Let Haith go? Suspend him? Support him? If the program can show the NCAA that Haith has been a model coach since leaving Miami, maybe he gets to keep his job. He’s done a decent job in his first year-and-a-half in Columbia.

Success or not, however brief, when the NCAA labels you a cheater, under circumstances like these, it’s hard to keep any job you have after that. It’ll be interesting to see if Haith keeps his, or what happens to him going forward in general.

David Harten is the editor and founder of The Backboard Chronicles. You can follow him on Twitter at @David_Harten.

Tom Izzo’s point is valid, but he’s wrong about the new fouling rules

Eron Harris, Tom Izzo
AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
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On Sunday night, after No. 3 Michigan State knocked off No. 23 Providence in the final of the Wooden Legacy, Spartans head coach Tom Izzo made sure to make his feelings known about the new college basketball officiating mandates.

He doesn’t like them.

At all.

“I just think we’re taking the flow of the game away,” Izzo said. “Maybe it’ll change. We’ll play by the same rules everybody else does. But I think I can voice my opinion to say that I don’t agree with it.”

Part of what frustrated Izzo was that, in a matchup between the two best players in college basketball, both Denzel Valentine and Kris Dunn were sent to the bench with foul trouble.

“I didn’t like it either way,” Izzo said. “I didn’t like having Denzel on the bench, and I didn’t even like watching Dunn on the bench.”

“Don’t tweet this now and leave out the officials,” he added, according to “It’s not their fault. Because that’s the way they’re mandated to call them. So I am really either blaming the rules committee, which ends up on the coaches somewhat. So I’m looking in the mirror and blaming myself because I should have argued it more maybe. I just don’t think it’s fun to have these guys sitting.”

This is nothing new for Izzo. This was calculated. He basically said the same thing after Michigan State, then No. 1 in the country, beat Oklahoma in the Coaches vs. Cancer Classic two seasons ago, when the rules committee tried to implement these same rules. It was his pushback that started the campaign to get rid of the freedom of movement rules.

But here’s the thing: we all knew this was going to happen. We knew there was going to be an adjustment period, for coaches and players and referees alike. In the long run, freedom of movement is good for basketball. It’s part of the reason the NBA is so much fun to watch these days, as their emphasis on the freedom of movement got us out of the days where the Detroit Pistons were winning titles without scoring 80 points.

Physicality is ingrained in college basketball. Coaches teach defense a certain way. Players play defense a certain way. The guys in the NBA are stronger, but the style of play is much more physical in the college game than the pro game. That doesn’t change overnight.

It changes when those rules are enforced and those fouls are called, and, as a result, the players and coaches learn to adjust to them.

Kennesaw State blows eight-point lead in 16 seconds, loses to Elon

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Kennesaw State entered Monday night at 1-6 on the season, but with 19 seconds left, it looked like the Owls have their second of the season locked up. Kendrick Ray made a pair of free throws with 19 seconds left to put KSU up 89-81, and all they had to do was avoid a complete meltdown to get out with a win.

They couldn’t.

A Luke Eddy layup with 16 seconds left cut the lead to six, and after KSU’s Nigel Pruitt missed two free throws, Dainan Swoope his a three with seven seconds left to make the score 89-86.

On the ensuing inbounds, Kennesaw State threw the ball away … and then proceeded to foul Eddy when he was shooting a three. This is what that disaster looked like:

Eddy would hit all three threes before, shockingly, KSU turned the ball over again. Elon could not capitalize this time, sending the game to overtime, where the Phoenix outscored the Owls 14-4.

Elon won 104-94.

Here’s what the comeback looked like on the play-by-play:

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