Kevin O'Neill

What Kevin O’Neill did wrong

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So the three-and-a-half year tenure of Kevin O’Neill ended today at USC. First of all, it’s never good to see a coach, and especially a good guy like O’Neill, lose their job. Here’s to hoping he lands on his feet quickly, which he should. He’s a fantastic basketball mind.

But what cost him his job? A few things.

Failure to recruit Los Angeles well

I thought about this after seeing a tweet from Josh Gershon of

That’s a huge mistake by O’Neill. Much like not recruiting New York City as the coach of St. John’s or Chicago at DePaul (though at this point…). You have to be able to keep the home base as your home base. Although, in fairness, UCLA splits it with them. This season? One player from the actual city of Los Angeles in Brendyn Taylor. Excluding his first season, in which he was playing with a number of Tim Floyd’s players, O’Neill brought in five total Los Angeles recruits. He also went after guys that left pundits scratching their heads. That’s totally unacceptable for the fanbase.

Injuries or not, 2011-12 cost him

Injuries aren’t something a coach can control. Players get hurt. But even after the variable infirmary O’Neill had in his training room last season, the 6-25 record that came out of it signaled a complete loss of everything. Players, effort, talent. It also signaled what O’Neill’s teams had when faced with adversity. O’Neill couldn’t help it. These are college kids. But even glossing over who was healthy, they had enough to at least compete in a Pac-12 Conference that sent just two teams to the NCAA Tournament. Which brings me to this…

Inability to compete in the Pac-12

Injuries or not, the Pac-12 has routinely been one of the worst of the Power Six conferences in O’Neill’s four seasons in L.A. With that, programs expect to all be able to compete, even if that’s because everyone is on the same level of mediocrity. In his three-and-a-half years, his teams were 21-37 in Pac-10/Pac-12 play, with their best record being 10-8 in 2010-11 when they squeaked into the NCAA Tournament at 19-15. Things have improved a bit this season, and when the Trojans didn’t, O’Neill got the axe.

No signature player

From a straight-up on-the-court perspective, O’Neill was never able to bring in a dynamic player that defined his team. Before him, Floyd brought in O.J. Mayo (even if it eventually got him ousted). Every solid team has one and he failed to get one. From the looks of it, maybe O’Neill though Jio Fontan could be that guy. While he’s been the best player on the team, he hasn’t been a guy that can put a program on his back.

These are a few reasons O’Neill is no longer employed by USC. He’s a great coach and shouldn’t have any trouble finding a program that needs his services, but you can’t have all these things and keep your job.

David Harten is the editor and founder of The Backboard Chronicles. You can follow him on Twitter at @David_Harten.

POSTERIZED: 7-foot-6 Mamadou Ndiaye dunks on defender without jumping

Screen Shot 2015-11-30 at 12.03.27 PM
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Mamadou Ndiaye is one of the most unique players in college basketball.

Because he’s 7-foot-6.

Guys like that don’t come around often, and when they do, they do things like this: posterizing an opponent without having to jump.


[PHOTO: Ndiaye vs. 7-foot-6 Tacko Fall]

Ex-Duke guard, Marshall assistant Chris Duhon suspended after arrest

Chris Duhon
AP Photo/The Herald-Dispatch, Sholten Singer
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Marshall assistant coach Chris Duhon has been suspended by the university after he was arrested on a charge of aggravateddrunken driving early Monday morning.

Duhon, who is currently in his second season at Marshall, was booked into the Western Regional Jail in Barboursville, West Virginia, at 4:15 a.m. on Monday, according to the Herald-Dispatch.

The athletic department released a statement saying that Duhon had been suspended later on Monday.

Duhon was a member of Duke’s 2001 National Title team. He played for the Blue Devils from 2000-2004 and spent nine years in the NBA with the Bulls, Knicks, Magic and Lakers.