Late Night Snacks: Wednesday proves why conference play is unmatched

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Games of the Night

No. 6 Kansas 97, Iowa State 89 (OT)

Kansas trailed by six points with close to four minutes remaining, but freshman Ben McLemore hit a clutch bank three-pointer with one second remaining to tie the game at 79-79. The Jayhawks controlled overtime and got the victory. McLemore finished with 33 points on 10-of-12 shooting. Both Kevin Young and Jeff Withey posted double-doubles for Kansas. Credit Iowa State, though, for staying in the game and giving Kansas a challenge. Six players scored in double figures for the Cyclones, including a double-double of 19 points and 11 rebounds from Melvin Ejim.

Boise State 63, Wyoming 61

Down by one point with just over nine seconds remaining, Boise State brought the ball up the floor and set up for the win. Igor Hadziomerovic drove the baseline after getting a hand-off on the wing and kicked it out to Jeff Elorriaga, who buried a three at the buzzer to win it. Wyoming loses on its home floor and its previously unblemished record is no more. Elorriaga finished with 18 points.

Also of Note: Towson 99, William & Mary 86 (2OT)

Important Outcomes 

1. No. 7 Syracuse 72, Providence 66

The Orange struggled to pull away from the scrappy Friars on Wednesday night, but C.J. Fair and Michael Carter-Williams were able to lead their team to a win. Fair finished with a double-double of 23 points and 11 rebounds.

2. No. 8 Minnesota 84, No. 12 Illinois 67

We know the Big Ten is going to be a battle all season long, but No. 8 Minnesota has now distinguished itself as perhaps the legitimate third contender in the conference behind No. 2 Michigan and No. 5 Indiana. Joe Coleman had 29 points on 10-of-16 shooting for the Gophers.

3. No. 14 Butler 72, St. Joseph’s 66

Butler got its first taste of what Atlantic 10 conference play is like and responded with a hard-fought win. Rotnei Clarke had 28 points to pace the Bulldogs from the perimeter and Andrew Smith had 24 points and 10 rebounds on the interior. Brad Stevens has his team rolling after it knocked off No. 1 Indiana.

Starred

1. Ben McLemore, Kansas (33 points, 10-of-12 FG, 6-of-6 3pt FG)

McLemore played with the poise of a seasoned veteran in his team’s gusty win over Iowa State Wednesday night. He was a perfect 6-of-6 from behind the three-point line and was a perfect 7-of-7 from the free throw line. Kansas needed a hero to beat the Cyclones, and McLemore was there to deliver. NBA scouts are taking notice.

2. Cleanthony Early, Wichita State (39 points, 13-of-19 FG)

The Missouri Valley is turning out to be another wild conference and Early’s 39 points kept No. 23 Wichita State from being upset at the hands of a Southern Illinois team that is now 0-4 in conference play. He added six rebounds and two blocks, as well.

3. Jamaal Franklin, San Diego State (20 points, 18 rebounds, 5 assists, 3 blocks)

To go along with that impressive stat line, he led the Aztecs to a win and had this ridiculous dunk, throwing the ball to himself off the backboard and slamming it home. Franklin continues to distinguish himself as one of the best players in the Mountain West and will undoubtedly be in the conversation for Conference Player of the Year.

Also of Note: Jerrelle Benimon, Towson (26 points, 12 rebounds) | Jeff Elorriaga (18 points, Game-winning buzzer beater) | Mike Fitzgerald, Air Force (30 points, 9-of-10 FG)

Struggled

1. Dez Wells, Maryland (2-of-9 FG, 5 points)

In a three-point loss to Florida State, Wells’ lack of production hurt Maryland. He was seven points off his season average and was never able to find his rhythm against the Seminoles.

2. California’s scoring combo, Allen Crabbe and Justin Cobbs (Combined 7-of-27 FG, 18 points)

Already working through injuries, coach Mike Montgomery turns to Crabbe and Cobbs for an average of 37 points per game together. Both struggled from the floor against Washington, leading to a 15-point loss in Berkeley.

Three Facts 

1. The Mountain West Conference is going to be the best conference in the country west of the Mississippi River this season. If Wednesday night is any indication (New Mexico tough win over UNLV, San Diego State escaping vs. Fresno, Boise State sinking Wyoming), the conference tournament in Las Vegas is going to be wild.

2. Kansas extended its winning streak at Allen Fieldhouse to 31 straight games with its win over Iowa State.

3. Towson beat William & Mary in double overtime, 99-86. The Tigers have now won four straight, the first time that has happened since 2000.

Marshall Henderson Shot Tracker

Ole Miss’ Henderson finished with 32 points in a win over Tennessee on Wednesday night, but shot just 3-of-12 from three-point range. He was helped by his ability to get to the line, going 13-of-14 from the stripe.

Top 25 Scores

No. 2 Michigan 62, Nebraska 47

No. 3 Louisville 73, Seton Hall 58

No. 6 Kansas 97, Iowa State 89

No. 7 Syracuse 72, Providence 66

No. 8 Minnesota 84, No. 12 Illinois 67

No. 11 Florida 77, Georgia 44

No. 14 Butler 72, St. Joseph’s 66

Daniel Martin is a writer and editor at JohnnyJungle.com, covering St. John’s. You can find him on Twitter:@DanielJMartin_

CBT Podcast: Michael Porter Jr. is back, Duke and Kentucky might be back, Allonzo Trier’s gone

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Fun episode today. Rob Dauster was joined by one of the up-and-coming stars at ESPN, Dalen Cuff, to talk through the changes that Duke and Kentucky have made in recent weeks and whether or not that changes our perception of those teams moving forward. They also discussed Trae Young’s regression as well as the root of their soccer fandom, and all of that happened roughly 90 minutes before news broke that Missouri’s Michael Porter Jr. was cleared by doctors to play while Arizona’s Allonzo Trier was once against ineligible for a positive PED test, so Travis Hines of NBC Sports jumped on the podcast to talk through all of that. The rundown:

OPEN: Should Michael Porter Jr. play this season?

10:05: Did Allonzo Trier get screwed by the NCAA?

16:55: Why did Dalen Cuff sully his name by becoming an Arsenal fan?

26:20: Why has Duke been better without Marvin Bagley III?

34:05: Is Jarred Vanderbilt the key to unlock Kentucky’s potential?

39:25: Have you changed your outlook on Duke or Kentucky in the long-term?

43:45: Texas Tech losing Keenan Evans was a bummer.

48:00: So let’s talk about this Trae Young slump.

Duke, Michigan State and Kentucky respond to report connecting players to agent payments

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Duke, Michigan State and Kentucky are the three most visible programs that have had their program connected to today’s report from Yahoo Sports that linked current players to potential NCAA violations involving ex-NBA agent Andy Miller and a former employee, Christian Dawkins.

According to the report, the mother of Duke freshman Wendell Carter had lunch with Dawkins at a Longhorn Steakhouse where Dawkins spent $106 on the meal. The parents of Michigan State sophomore Miles Bridges are alleged to have received a mean with $70 from Dawkins as well as a $400 cash advance. Kentucky freshman Kevin Knox or a member of his family is listed as receiving a meal from Dawkins, although his father has already denied that this happened.

All three programs have denied wrongdoing.

“Duke immediately reviewed the matter and, based on the available information, determined there are no eligibility issues related to today’s report,” read a statement released by Duke AD Kevin White.

“We are aware of the report in Yahoo! Sports,” Michigan State head coach Tom Izzo said in a statement. “While we will cooperate with any and all investigations, we have no reason to believe that I, any member of our staff or student-athlete did anything in violation of NCAA rules.”

“I have no relationship with Andy Miller or any of his associates,” John Calipari’s statement read. “Neither my staff nor I utilized any agent, including Andy Miller or any of his associates, to provide any financial benefits to a current or former Kentucky student-athlete. We will cooperate fully with the appropriate authorities.”

Cal also said in a press conference that he believes Knox will play on Saturday against Missouri.

San Diego State suspends Malik Pope after reports of loan from agent

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San Diego State announced on Friday that they have provisionally suspended senior forward Malik Pope for allegedly receiving $1,400 from a former NBA agent.

He did not travel with the team for Saturdays game against San Jose State.

According to documents from the FBI’s investigation into corruption in college basketball, documents that were obtained by Yahoo Sports and published on Friday morning, Andy Miller provided Pope with a loan of $1,400 that was to be repaid when Pope turned pro and signed with Miller.

Loans from agents are considered impermissible benefits.

Pope is the first player to be provisionally suspended by his team as a result of today’s news. USC’s De’Anthony Melton and Auburn’s Austin Wiley and Danjel Purifoy have not played this season having being referenced in the complaints released by the FBI in September. Alabama’s Collin Sexton as well as Oklahoma State’s Jeffery Carroll were initially suspended as their program’s attempted to get their eligibility reinstated.

Mark Emmert refuses to acknowledge NCAA’s fundamental issue: The sham of amateurism

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The concept of amateurism has been around for nearly two centuries.

It started back in the 1800s, when organized sport was first beginning in England. The upper class, the one-percenters of that time, lived a lifestyle that allowed them to do things like play rugby, or polo, or soccer, and succeed at it.

When you don’t have to worry about working six or seven days a week in a factory you have the time to practice kicking with your weaker foot. But those blue collar workers, the ones that spent six or seven days a week doing manual labor, they were the better athletes. Bigger, stronger, faster. Those rich guys didn’t stand a chance, which is why amateurism was born.

You cannot be paid to play sports, they said. You have to play sports for the love of the game, which those rich guys were able to do because they didn’t have to spend their days trying to work enough hours to put food on the table for their wives and children.

Amateurism, the core tenet of the NCAA, was quite literally created to keep rich English guys from getting their asses kicked by poor English guys.

Today, that concept, that farce, trumps all else in college athletics.

It’s why, in 2018, the NCAA has contracts that guarantees the association roughly $13.5 BILLION dollars over the next 14 years to broadcast a tournament that Duke’s Wendell Carter may not be able to play in because his mom allegedly had a $106 lunch paid for by a recruiter for an agent two years ago.

On Friday morning, hours after Yahoo Sports published a bombshell report that included documents and spreadsheets detailing the recruitment strategy of former NBA agent Andy Miller, NCAA president Mark Emmert released a statement addressing the evidence presented.

“These allegations, if true, point to systematic failures that must be fixed and fixed now,” Emmert, who made at least $1.9 million in 2015, began in the statement, and he is absolutely, 100 percent correct.

If, as Emmert put it, “we want college sports in America,” we need to do away with amateurism rules. We need to do away with the archaic notion that these athletes do not have any value. We need to do away with the idea that these athletes — athletes with the potential to earn, quite literally, hundreds of millions of dollars in their playing career, mind you — having access to professional representation before they turn 19 years old is some sort of problem.

The simple truth is this: If you do not allow players to access their fair market value without breaking NCAA rules, you are perpetuating the underground economy that is already flourishing. There is too much money in the game, and the numbers that you are seeing tossed around today are simply on the agent side, and from just one agent. Yahoo did not gain access to all of the evidence that the FBI has gathered during this investigation, and even if the did, the network built by Miller is a fraction of the black market created by the NCAA’s insistence that amateurism reign supreme.

Think about it like this: If basketball’s underground economy was a movie, then what we saw today was the shortened trailer that airs three weeks after the movie was actually released.

We’re just scratching the surface.

What you are not seeing now is the money that shoe companies spend to funnel players to certain schools that will help build their brand. Brian Bowen taught us that players that don’t reach the top 20 in a recruiting class can be worth $100,000 to a company like Adidas. If Brian Bowen is worth $100,000 to Adidas, what is a talent like Marvin Bagley III or Deandre Ayton worth to them?

What you are also not seeing is the money that flows from boosters to the players. You don’t think that a booster for, say, Big Tech would love to spend a few thousand dollars to land a player that will help keep them above Big State in the standings? Think about how much you love your favorite team. Now think about how much money you’d be willing to part with every year to help that team get the players they need to get to a Final Four if you had $30 million in the bank.

Say it with me now:

That.

Is.

Never.

Going.

Away.

It doesn’t matter how many smart people Emmert tries to put on a committee.

Boosters are never going to stop wanting their team to win. Shoe companies are never going to stop spending billions of dollars to help build their brand. Coaches are never going to stop looking the other way because getting those good players is how they win, and winning is how they get better jobs and longer contracts.

The fix is so damn easy, too.

Go to the Olympic model.

Schools don’t have to play the players. There won’t be any Title IX issues, which is the crux of the issue when it comes to the “schools should pay the players” debate; it’s not exactly a secret football and men’s basketball subsidizes the rest of an athletic department.

The athletes will be able to receive their fair market value because their ability to profit off of their own name and their own likeness will not be artificially capped by an association that wants to keep all of that money for themselves.

And therein lies the problem.

Think about it like this: Adidas currently has a deal with the University of Louisville that will pay the school $160 million over the next decade for all Cardinal athletes to be decked out head-to-toe in nothing but the three stripes. This deal is far from unique. Under Armour has a deal with UCLA worth $280 million. Nike’s new deal with Michigan is valued at roughly $173 million.

Lamar Jackson (Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

The goal there isn’t necessarily to get every player covered head-to-toe in their brand. The goal is to get, say, Lamar Jackson wearing Adidas while he’s at Louisville, or Josh Rosen wearing UA while he’s at UCLA. With basketball, it’s even more specific. Nike wants, say, Michael Porter Jr. wearing the swoosh in high school and college so that they can sign him when he gets to the pros and make billions off of his brand if he happens to turn into the next Kevin Durant, or LeBron James, or Kyrie Irving, or Steph Curry.

If amateurism didn’t exist, if Nike could go straight Porter or Adidas could go straight to Jackson when they were 15 or 16 years old, would the incentive to invest billions of dollars in sponsorship deals with the schools still be as strong? There would still be money there, but there wouldn’t be as much because a good chunk of it would be going to the players those companies actually want.

It works on a micro-level, too.

A car dealership in Lexington or a restaurant in Lawrence is going to advertise with the school — on the local broadcasts, with promotions at the game, on the coach’s radio show, etc. — instead of being able to put, say, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander on a billboard to help sell Toyota Camrys or, say, Devonte’ Graham in a commercial touting a new Happy Hour special.

Let’s put this another way: If you let the labor get paid, then the profits of the company and the salaries of the decision-makers within that company take a hit.

Emmert ended his statement on Friday like this: “We also will continue to cooperate with the efforts of federal prosecutors to identify and punish the unscrupulous parties seeking to exploit the system through criminal acts,” blissfully aware that he and his cronies are the unscrupulous parties exploiting the system, without a f*** to give when that direct deposit hits this afternoon.

Kevin Knox’s father: ‘I’ve never met Christian Dawkins’

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The father of Kevin Knox spoke with SEC Country on Friday morning and told the outlet that he has never met Christian Dawkins or Andy Miller.

Knox is one of the players that was mentioned in the documents disclosed by Yahoo Sports on Friday morning detailing the way that former NBA agent Andy Miller recruited players to his agency. Knox is mentioned in the report as either him or a family member having a meal with Christian Dawkins. The evidence is an expense report that Dawkins filed with Miller in oder to get reimbursed.

“Obviously the investigation is still going on, but the only comment I can say is I’ve never met Christian Dawkins before or Andy Miller, and if they sat next to me at the grocery store, I wouldn’t know who they were,” Kevin Knox Sr. told SEC Country. “Out of respect for the NCAA investigation and the University of Kentucky investigation into this, I’d just say that I’ve never met Christian Dawkins or Andy Miller before and leave it at that.”

He also added that he expected his son to play against Missouri on Saturday night.

Kentucky has not yet commented on the report. Mark Emmert, however, has.