Maurice Creek

Maurice Creek could return soon for Indiana, what could he bring?

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Tonight, Don Fischer, play-by-play man for Indiana basketball, said on the Indiana/Penn State pregame show that redshirt junior Maurice Creek is only a week away from returning from a right foot injury for the Hoosiers.

Creek’s career in Bloomington has been one collective injury. He’s had every season ended with an injury, with this one being the first that he’ll actually come back to the court, after suffering it in-season.

For his career, Creek, a 6-5 guard swingman who by all means was living up to the hype when he came out of Hargrave Military Academy four years ago, is averaging 9.4 points in 40 games with 25 starts. He’s made the most of his time on the court when he’s been healthy enough to be on it.

I’ll never hold injuries — on the court, anyway — against a player. Giving effort and having your body betray you or an accident put you out isn’t something a player can control most of the time. But it’s really hard to see what Creek will do when he comes back, which, if Fischer is right, will be when the Hoosiers face home games against Minnesota and Wisconsin, consecutively. So if anything, Creek helps the depth.

But, in honor of this being the first time Creek has returned from an injury in a season, let’s look at what Creek could bring that, either Indiana needs or will want more of as they get deeper and deeper into conference play.


As a freshman in 2009-10, Creek averaged 16.5 points through the team’s first 12 games, including 31 points against Kentucky. He averaged 8.3 points the next season before that season-ending injury. Then 3.0 points through 10 games this season. I’m going to go out on a whim and predict Creek becomes the Hoosiers fourth scoring option behind Zeller, Oladipo, Watford and Sheehey, edging out Hulls. It may take a week or two, but I could see Creek averaging 10-11 points per game especially on a team that is rife with scorers. And teams doubting his ability with so many injuries.


Though it feels like we’ve barely been able to see him on the court, Creek has played 40 games and started 25 in his career. He came off the bench for all 10 so far this season, clocking 11.3 minutes per game, but being totally healthy, Creek will be invaluable as a guy on the court in late-game situations. He’s been there and he can assist the elders like Sheehey, Hulls and Watford in settling the team in key situations. In the most talented conference in college basketball, that’s huge.

An additional deep threat

Maurice Creek, shooter? He can hit the outside shot with regularity. Creek was 7-for-20 from three-point range before injury this season. For his career, Creek is 63-for-171, a 36.8-percent clip. Hulls will like that help and in games agaisnt Michigan, he can — try, at least — to keep up with Nik Stauskas.

Good depth

Never be fooled. There’s a difference between “depth” and “good depth”. Pretty simple. Talent separates the two. Creek’s blend of experience, athleticism and talent adds, at the very least, a solid bench threat that coach Tom Crean can rely on when the games get tight.

David Harten is a sportswriter and college basketball blogger. You can follow him on Twitter at @David_Harten.

CBT Podcast: Louisville’s Notice of Allegations, breaking down elite freshmen

Rick Pitino
AP Photo/Frank Franklin II
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In the latest episode of the College Basketball Talk podcast, I’m joined by Sam Vecenie of the Sporting News to talk about the Notice of Allegations that the NCAA handed down to Louisville as well as taking a deep dive into the freshmen class and some of the elite NBA Draft prospects.

As always, you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Audioboom or anywhere else that podcasts are given away for free.

If you enjoy what you hear on this podcast, please rate and review the podcast, as it will help us reach more listeners.

Thanks for listening!

Kennesaw State misses dunk, yet still makes shot

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Jordan Jones will not score a more impressive bucket all season. Probably for the rest of his career. And that’s not being harsh. That’s just how ridiculous the three-second clip below is.

The Kennesaw State junior forward went up for a windmill dunk, back-ironed the attempt with so much force — and at the right angle — that it went in a different hoop along the sideline.

The 6-foot-8 Jones averaged 3.5 points and 3.4 rebounds per game for the Owls last season.

Report: One-and-done rule to stay in new CBA

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 23:  Ben Simmons poses with Commissioner Adam Silver after being drafted first overall by the Philadelphia 76ers in the first round of the 2016 NBA Draft at the Barclays Center on June 23, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
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Last month, the NBA and NBA Players’ Association reportedly began discussing a new collective bargaining agreement.

On Thursday night, Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports’ The Vertical reported that a “deal was within sight” as the two sides have moved closer and closer in negotiations.

One of the consistent issues over the years has been one-and-done rule, which was instituted during the 2005 negotiations, requiring a prospective draftee to be 19 years old and be one year removed from his high school graduating class.

According to Wojnarowski, the one-and-done rule will remain intact in the new CBA agreement.

Since taking over the league in February 2014, NBA commissioner Adam Silver had made increasing the age limit to 20 years old a priority. So, this reported news is clearly a comprise on the side of himself and the owners; a group of 30 executives who would rather have another year of scouting and information on a prospect rather than taking a potential gamble on a teenager in the first round.

For college basketball, things remain relatively the same. Some players will go for the money, whether pundits like it or not — remember, every early entry should be viewed on a case-by-case basis. But recent rule changes have benefited college players. Pushing the deadline back saw tons and tons of players declare for the 2016 NBA Draft, which left many coaches in precautions situations as they sweated over what next year’s roster was going to look like. But it was beneficial to the players, providing them a thorough process of interviews, workouts and, in some cases, a spot in the NBA Draft Combine. This gave them the resources and insight to make informed opinions about their future, whether that is finding out that their stock is likely at its highest, or getting the proper critiques on what they need to improve upon before turning pro.

The NBA and NBPA each have the ability to opt out of the current collective bargaining agreement on Dec. 15, but Wojnarowski reports that a deal is expected to be in place by then.

Eustachy to remain with Colorado St. through 2020-21 season

LAS VEGAS, NV - MARCH 13:  Head Coach Larry Eustachy of the Colorado State Rams calls to his team during a semifinal game of the Mountain West Conference basketball tournament against the San Diego State Aztecs at the Thomas & Mack Center on March 13, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.  (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
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FORT COLLINS, Colo. (AP) Colorado State extended basketball coach Larry Eustachy’s contract Thursday through the 2020-21 season, adding a year to his existing deal.

Eustachy enters the season 11 wins away from 500 for his Division I career.

The 60-year-old Eustachy took over at Colorado State in 2012. He’s 87-48 with the Rams, including an NCAA Tournament appearance during his first season in charge.

Athletic director Joe Parker says he’s “excited about what the future holds for this program over the remainder of his coaching time here.”

As part of his agreement, Eustachy has bonuses for winning 20 games ($40,000), taking the Mountain West Conference championship ($100,000) and earning an NCAA Tournament bid ($200,000).

He’s led five programs to 24-plus-win seasons: CSU, Southern Miss, Iowa State, Utah State and Idaho.

Oregon State’s Tres Tinkle cleared for practice

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA - MARCH 18:  Tres Tinkle #3 of the Oregon State Beavers reacts late in the second half from the bench in the second half against the Virginia Commonwealth Rams in the first round of the 2016 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Chesapeake Energy Arena on March 18, 2016 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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Oregon State may have surprised many last season when the Beavers reached the program’s first NCAA Tournament in more than a quarter of a century.

Wayne Tinkle’s club will attempt to replicate that success this season, however, it will be without the services of Gary Payton II. On Thursday, Tinkle received good news regarding his son, and team’s top returning scorer, Tres.

The 6-foot-8 sophomore forward has been cleared to return to all basketball activities on Thursday, according to Danny Moran of The Oregonian. Tres Tinkle has been recovering from a surgery in April to fix a broken bone in his right foot.

The injury, suffered in March, forced Tinkle to miss the final five games of the season, including a first-round loss to VCU in the 2016 NCAA Tournament.

Tinkle averaged 13.1 points and 5.4 assists per game in his first season in Corvallis. He’ll headline a young roster, accompanied by fellow sophomore, Stephen Thompson Jr., who also ended his first collegiate season averaging double figures. Four-star recruit JaQuori McLaughlin will assume the point guard duties left behind by Payton II. However, it’ll be difficult for anyone, especially a freshman, to replicate the stats Payton II produced, and I’m not talking about points. Payton II, at 6-foot-3, recorded team-highs in rebounds (7.8), assists (5.0) and steals (2.5) per game.

The Beavers may have made the jump into the NCAA Tournament picture a year or two earlier than expected. Regardless, a healthy Tinkle keeps them competitive in the Pac-12 this season, especially when you factor in that several teams, like Oregon State, have their own questions to address.

Oregon State opens the season on Nov. 11 against Prairie View A&M.