John Calipari

There’s a bigger point to Kentucky monitoring the heart rate of its players than work ethic

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Kentucky head coach John Calipari tends to write about interesting topics on his website in regards to his basketball team, which beat Eastern Michigan 90-38 last night and begins SEC play next Thursday at Vanderbilt.

The most recent entry focuses on how hard his players are working in practice and what’s being done to keep track of it. Kentucky’s using heart monitors, which reveal the amount of energy that each player is expending during team and individual workouts.

According to Calipari the heart rates of the players will be at a level of 90% (or higher) during games, and the goal is to make sure they’re working out at a similar rate. And if not, there’s running to be done to get them to the desired heart rate.

Judging by the reactions on Twitter it seems as if some have a problem with this, but frankly I don’t. And it’s because this is about more than simply making sure that the guys are working hard.

According to the school’s estimates players use between 5,500 and 6,000 calories per day, which makes nutrition (not just taking in calories but making sure those calories are good for the body) even more important.

One, it allows us to measure their caloric expenditure. Through this device, we now know our guys burn between 5,500 and 6,000 calories a day that they must replenish. I’m seeing numbers that are proving that you have to feed these kids more. If we’re the ones burning up these calories, then we should be responsible for feeding them and replacing those calories.

Back in October Steve Eder of the New York Times wrote a story on college athletes being underfed, as the requirements placed on them in regards to competition aren’t necessarily being combined with the nourishment needed to play at a high level.

“The perception, for the general public, is that the day they get to school and get their tennis shoes, they are getting this entry into a world where the horn of plenty is always there for them,” said Dave Ellis, a sports dietitian for 30 years, who has fed teams at Nebraska and Wisconsin.

This, it seems, is not the case. NCAA regulations limit colleges to one formal “training meal” a day for their scholarship athletes, whether the athletes are playing tennis, football or any other sport. A few snacks — nuts, fruit and bagels — may also be provided, as well as some nutritional supplements like energy bars.

Now of course this will open the door for those who argue that “regular students don’t get those perks” but are these truly “regular” students? Given the revenue that collegiate athletics has generated in recent years due to escalating television contracts (which we can thank for conference realignment), would making sure that the athletes are receiving proper nutrition really be that big of a problem?

Feel free to get agitated about Calipari wanting to make sure his players are “working hard” through the use of heart monitors if you wish, but this is about far more than making guys run suicides if they aren’t.

Hopefully more studies like this lead to better nutritional allowances for student-athletes across the board.

Raphielle also writes for the NBE Basketball Report and can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

Pressure is on new coach Steve Prohm at Iowa State

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AMES, Iowa (AP) Five months ago, Iowa State’s Steve Prohm was the coach at mid-major Murray State. Now he’s in charge of one of the big favorites in the Big 12.

Prohm officially began his first season in charge of the Cyclones on Tuesday with the team’s annual media day.

Iowa State has all the pieces to make a run at the league title and more – provided that Prohm can handle coaching college basketball at the highest level, of course.

In the minds of Prohm’s players, the Cyclones have nothing to worry about.

“Coach (Prohm) is in here earning our trust and our respect every day,” said senior forward Georges Niang. “Even though he’s not trying to cross any of our toes, he puts his foot down when he needs to and lets us know that stuff needs to get done. I think he has a great combination of how to keep us motivated…and still be stern and be able to get the most out of us.”

Fred Hoiberg’s departure for the Chicago Bulls after five mostly successful seasons gave Prohm a shot at a national title. The roster Hoiberg left behind for Prohm is loaded.

Niang, a likely preseason first-team All-American, second-team All-Big 12 point guard Monte Morris and league defensive player of the year Jameel McKay headline one of the nation’s most talented starting units. Throw in veterans like Naz Long, Matt Thomas, Abdel Nader and transfer Deonte Burton, and Prohm might just have the best roster a new Power Five coach has inherited since Bill Guthridge took over for Dean Smith at North Carolina in 1997.

Guthridge reached the Final Four with his first team.

Prohm isn’t shying away from the notion that Iowa State is among the handful of teams with serious national title aspirations.

“Yeah, they’re realistic,” Prohm said when asked about the sky-high expectations for this year’s team. “I think we have the opportunity to have a very special season.”

The similarities between what type of styles Prohm and Hoiberg use was cited as a big reason why Iowa State hired him. Hoiberg even lobbied for Prohm to athletic director Jamie Pollard during the hiring process.

To that end, Prohm is going to let his players have a ton of input on how they play. Prohm doesn’t plan many changes, just tweaks that mostly involve techniques to improve Iowa State’s somewhat inconsistent rebounding and defense.

“I don’t need to say, `This is the way we’re doing things guys because this is the way I did it.’ That’s stupid,” Prohm said. “I need to meet these guys halfway.”

Prohm also acknowledged that he’ll be doing quite a bit of learning himself this season. But Prohm said he intends to embrace the unique opportunity he’s been afforded.

“This is a great situation to walk into. No question,” Prohm said. “Is there pressure? Yeah. But who wants a job with no pressure?”

Lawyer: Pierre suspended due to ‘unfair and defective process’

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Dayton forward Dyshawn Pierre, who is suspended from school for the fall semester stemming from a sexual assault allegation, has sued the university over what his lawyer calls an “unfair and defective internal process”.

Peter R. Ginsberg, Pierre’s lawyer, released a statement to on Wednesday stating that his client intends to file suit over the ruling, saying that the school arrived at a suspension through “fundamentally unfair and defective internal process that deprived him of vital rights and protections and has resulted in a disruption in his education, a drastic blow to his reputation, and a potentially fatal interference” with basketball.

Pierre was suspended due to an incident that allegedly took place in mid-April and was reported in May, according to the Dayton Daily News. The prosecutor declined to press charges in the case due to a lack of evidence, the paper reported.

Pierre, a 6-foot-6 wing that averaged 12.7 points last season, is not currently enrolled at the school.

“What has been done to me has been grossly unfair. The allegations against me are false,” he said. “And now I find myself with my reputation tarnished, my schooling interrupted and my dream of helping the basketball team win a national championship being threatened. I want justice, and I want a return to my normal life.”

Ginsberg represented Dez Wells in a similar case. Wells, then at Xavier, was expelled by the university in 2012 following a sexual assault allegation, but he won a settlement from the school in 2014. The crux of Ginsberg’s claims regarding Pierre’s case is that the process by which Dayton reached this conclusion is fundamentally flawed.