Roy Williams

Wish List: ‘Tis the season for Heels to open their gifts

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Over the course of the next two weeks, College Basketball Talk will be detailing what some of the country’s best, most intriguing, and thoroughly enigmatic teams need. It’s the spirit of the holidays. We’re in a giving mood.

What do other teams have on their Christmas Wish Lists? Click here to find out.

I don’t mean to sound like a Scrooge, but the Tar Heels need to be a bit more selfish this holiday season. They’re giving up far too much on both ends of the floor.

Gotta have it list-topper: Pure point

This sounds dumb. Wouldn’t every team in the country love to have a premiere point guard? Certainly. But the case can be made that Roy Williams’ offense simply does not function without an elite passer. Witness two seasons back, when Larry Drew II — while sporting a respectable 2.2 assist-to-turnover ratio, led his Tar Heels to five losses, including a 20-point blowout at mediocre Georgia Tech. Kendall Marshall took over and led the team to the Elite Eight. The long tail of the data shows that the Tar Heels couldn’t make hay in last year’s tournament after Marshall got hurt, and Drew is averaging 8.4 assists per game in Westwood. The takeaway is: it’s not good enough to be a good point guard at Carolina. What works elsewhere does not work in Chapel Hill.

We’re seeing it again this year. Dexter Strickland, Marcus Paige and Reggie Bullock have each shown the ability to sling the rock, but the team still loses games it shouldn’t. That’s because the Roy Williams offense is at its best when the ball hits the hardwood least. In transition, the long pass ahead to the man with the right angle to the basket is the key. In the half-court, it’s crisp ball reversal on the perimeter and a sharp eye for the cuts and screens that free up interior players. This ain’t no dribble-drive; Carolina needs to find someone who can drive this buggy at top speed without over-steering. On offense and defense, where the Heels are giving up way too much.

Stocking stuffer:  More from McAdoo

Yeah, he’s already the team’s leading scorer. Yeah, he’s just a sophomore. Yeah, he doesn’t have someone like Harrison Barnes to take some of the scoring load. Tough nuts. You don’t come to Carolina to be “pretty good.”

McAdoo is shooting 47% from the floor, which sounds pretty good until you turn the pages back and see that Ty Zeller shot well over 50% in the final three seasons of his UNC career. When you’re considered to be one of the year’s most likely breakout stars and one of the best big men in the ACC, you have to make opponents pay every time down the court.

Planning on re-gifting: Charity

‘Tis the season for giving. But you know when you give someone a new gadget and then notice that they never use it? What was it, the wrong color? You can’t at least set it on the table when I come to visit?

The Heels are  337th in the nation in Kenpom’s ratio of free throws attempted per field goal attempted, so they’re really not getting to the line much. And when a stingy opponent finally does reluctantly hand them a nicely-wrapped present, they squander it. They’re shooting 65.3% from the charity stripe as a team. Worse yet, they’re giving until it hurts on the other end, putting dead-eye shooters on the line far too often. These other guys know: when someone hands you a gift, the only gracious thing is to say thank you and make the most of it.

Eric Angevine is the editor of Storming the Floor. He tweets @stfhoops.

Bill Self on Cheick Diallo: ‘It may be a couple of more weeks’

2015 McDonald's All American Game
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Cheick Diallo is currently practicing with Kansas, but his eligibility still remains in question.

On Monday, Kansas head coach Bill Self appeared on “The Border Patrol” on WHB-AM 810 and was asked to update the status of his freshman big man.

“He’s been cleared to practice,” Self told hosts Steven St. John and Nate Bukaty. “(His status) is depending on what they find throughout from the information we submit to them whenever we get it all together.

“A lot of people think, ‘Well, why wouldn’t it all be together?’ Well there’s a lot of reasons why. It’s because they told us recently some things that they just wanted. Instead of just throwing it to them piece by piece, they requested we to just submit it all together, so it may be a couple of more weeks before we’re able to submit everything when you’re talking about getting information from schools in Mali and everything like that.

“But we hope in two weeks, maybe three weeks, before we have a definite answer. But right now, Cheick is like everybody else. He’s practicing.”

Diallo, a 6-foot-9 forward from Mali is allowed to practice with the Jayhawks, but has been waiting to be cleared by the NCAA Eligibility Center despite enrolling in classes over the summer and earning six credits. Self anticipated this would be a long process, but has remained confident Diallo, the top-5 recruit in Class of 2015, will eventually be cleared to play this season.

For three years, Diallo attended Our Savior New American School in Centereach, New York, which is currently under NCAA review. In September, Pitt freshman Damon Wilson, Diallo’s teammate at OSNA, was cleared to play.

Kansas opens the season on Nov. 13 against Northern Colorado.

Albany’s Peter Hooley accepts Inspiration Award

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Last week, Albany senior Peter Hooley accepted the Inspiration Award at the Coaches vs Cancer Basket Ball in Troy, New York. The Albany athletic department uploaded his entire speech on Monday afternoon.

Hooley had one of the most uplifting moments of March after months and months of heartache.

The junior guard missed three weeks of the season to travel back home to Australia to be with his mother, who was battling colon cancer. She passed away in January. Hooley returned to the team in February and the following month, the Great Danes had a shot at an NCAA tournament berth. In the America East Tournament championship, Hooley sunk a game-winning shot with 1.6 seconds to go.

Hooley, who graduated in May, was selected to give the commencement speech.