Christmas Wish Lists: Florida State needs the Kung-Fu Grip

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Over the course of the next two weeks, College Basketball Talk will be detailing what some of the country’s best, most intriguing, and thoroughly enigmatic teams need. It’s the spirit of the holidays. We’re in a giving mood.

What do other teams have on their Christmas Wish Lists? Click here to find out.

Gotta have it list-topper: Interior defense

It seems absurd to say that Florida State lacks defense. If there’s one thing a Seminoles fan could count on throughout the Leonard Hamilton era, it’s that the team could lock down, even on nights when the ball wasn’t finding the nets. Last season, FSU finished 15th defensively, and the two years before that, they were No. 1 in back to back seasons. What’s changed? Opponents are now shooting nearly 48 percent inside, a figure unheard of in recent seasons in Tallahassee. The ‘Noles clearly miss former Air Force Staff Sergeant Bernard James, who averaged more than two blocked shots per game for his career as a Seminole, but he was hardly the only one doing the job right; Xavier Gibson also helped form the wall inside in past seasons. This year, Kiel Turpin, Michael Ojo and Boris Bojanovsky — all legit seven-footers — have combined to prove conclusively that sheer size without positioning and technique amounts to very little.

Stocking Stuffer: Windex

Nobody’s cleaning the glass any more, and that’s killing these guys. The only player who seems to have the knack so far is 6’8″ junior Terrance Shannon, and the fouls are starting to mount up on him as he claws for each board. Shannon had a 15/10 double-double against St. Joe’s this season before he copped a DQ, and he had four-foul evenings against South Alabama, BYU, Mercer and Florida. Even if Shannon could do it all without getting into foul trouble, why should he have to? Someone else — if not several someone elses — needs to put in some elbow grease at window-cleaning time.

Planning on re-gifting: Haste

I know I’m getting some dirty looks now. Yes, I am saying that Florida State needs to slow the heck down. They’ve never been burners under Hamilton, but right now, they’re playing much faster than they did in past seasons when they excelled. This year’s team is hitting a pace of 72 possessions per 40 minutes. According to Basketball State, that’s above the national average and the ACC average so far. That’s causing their turnovers to go up, and their scoring to go down. FSU was built to be a bear, not a cheetah.

Clearly, everything on this wish list is tied together. The ‘Noles offense and defense are predicated on a slower pace and great rebounding, things that happen organically when there’s a big man in the middle who knows his business. The team is suffering because there’s no reliable post presence on either end of the floor. Assists are down, and the ball is going up faster and from farther away, because there’s no impetus to pound it inside right now. If they can’t handle the likes of South Alabama and Mercer, imagine what Mason Plumlee will do to them.

Florida State has big men, so they don’t need any more 7-foot-plus boxes under the tree. Maybe just an accessories package; something that replicates the old G.I. James kung-fu grip.

Eric Angevine is the editor of Storming the Floor. He tweets @stfhoops.

VIDEO: Leonard Hamilton gives awkward response when asked about Florida State not fouling

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Michigan outlasted Florida State in an ugly Elite Eight game on Saturday night as the Wolverines won 58-54 to advance to the Final Four.

The end of the game left a lot of viewers puzzled.

With the Seminoles in the midst of a furious rally, the team seemingly gave up in the final seconds. Down by four points with 11.8 seconds left, Florida State didn’t foul to extend the game as Michigan ran out the clock for the win. Since the Wolverines struggled from the free-throw line and missed two front-ends of one-and-ones in the final few minutes, the Seminoles fouling to extend the game seemed like a potential strategy.

Many viewers, as well as the broadcast crew working the game, wondered aloud why the Seminoles wouldn’t attempt to foul in that spot.

So Dana Jacobsen of CBS asked Hamilton about the final seconds of the game in a postgame interview.

An awkward interview ensued.


No. 3 Michigan outlasts No. 9 Florida State to advance to Final Four

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Michigan struggled to generate consistent offense, but the Wolverines held off No. 9 seed Florida State for a 58-54 win on Saturday night during the West Regional final in Los Angeles.

The No. 3 seed Wolverines (32-7) are headed back to the Final Four under head coach John Beilein for the first time since 2013 and for the eighth time in program history.

Making things look easy during a Thursday night blowout win over Texas A&M, Michigan made 10 first-half three-pointers to cruise to victory. During the Elite Eight, Michigan couldn’t generate any consistency from the perimeter. Only shooting 18 percent (4-for-22) from three-point range, Michigan missed ten straight three-pointers at one point as they had to grind out a win in an offensive struggle. Redshirt sophomore guard Charles Matthews paced the Wolverines with 17 points, while junior big man Mo Wagner chipped in 12 points despite an 0-for-7 shooting night from three-point range.

Even though Michigan has been known as a traditionally offensive-minded team under Beilein, it has been consistent defense that has the Wolverines advancing to San Antonio. Outside of the barrage of three-pointers Michigan hit against the Aggies on Thursday, this is a team that has struggled offensively during most of the 2018 NCAA tournament.

A year ago, Michigan advanced to the Sweet 16 behind a potent offense that had veterans like Derrick Walton Jr., Zak Irvin and D.J. Wilson. When all three of those guys moved on this offseason, the Wolverines became a more focused  team on the defensive end. The offseason saw Michigan hire assistant coach Luke Yaklich, as he became the team’s defensive coordinator. Point guard Zavier Simpson took over for Walton as the sophomore’s defensive-minded approach also aided in Michigan’s transformation into a two-way team.

It hasn’t always been pretty during the past few weeks, but Michigan is playing some of its best ball of the season right now. And the team’s offense isn’t even knocking down shots. Holding Florida State to only one field goal over an 11-minute span was the cushion that ultimately helped Michigan prevail when its offense couldn’t buy a bucket from the perimeter. That 11-minute stretch on defense was also something that last season’s Michigan team could not have pulled off.

Florida State (23-12) did its best to hang around despite having major offensive issues of their own. The Seminoles found themselves trailing by three points with under a minute left, but they couldn’t get over the hump in the final few possessions. Senior forward Phil Cofer (16 points) and junior guard P.J. Savoy (12 points) were the only two double-figure scorers for Florida State as they shot 32 percent (16-for-50) from the field and 25 percent (4-for-16) from three-point range.

The Seminoles were down by four with under 15 seconds left but they opted not to foul to extend the game. Michigan surprisingly ran out the clock as Florida State’s comeback (and season) ended in underwhelming fashion.

Michigan advances to next weekend’s Final Four in San Antonio as they’ll take on No. 11 seed and national darling Loyola.

Loyola-Chicago’s Sister Jean gets her piece of the net

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Loyola-Chicago’s hero — their 98-year old chaplain, Sister Jean — got her reward for being the good-luck charm that got the Ramblers to the Final Four.

Think about this:

  • The Ramblers beat Miami on a game-winning three with 0.3 seconds left
  • They beat Tennessee on a jumper with 3.6 seconds left that bounced off the rim, the backboard and the rim again before going in.
  • They needed a three with 7.6 seconds left to help them hold off Nevada in the Sweet 16.
  • A senior that never averaged more than 8.3 points and that had a season-high of 14 points against something called Eureka this season went for a career-high 23 points to get the Ramblers to the Final Four.

She earned this piece of the net.

The Atlanta Falcons are trying to recruit Sister Jean from Loyola

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The Atlanta Falcons are American sports’ most cursed franchise now that the Chicago Cubs have won a World Series.

Hell, Atlanta sports in general are a minefield of terrible losses, blown seasons and heartbreak.

Which is why the Falcons, who may or may not have blown a 28-3 lead in the Super Bowl to Tom Brady and the New England Patriots, are trying to get Sister Jean on their payroll:

Stay away, Falcons.

Sister Jean is ours.

Sincerely, College Basketball

No. 11-seed Loyola-Chicago advances past Kansas State, to Final Four

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Sister Jean strikes again!

Ben Richardson, a senior guard who’s never averaged more than 8.3 points in a season, broke double-figures just four times during his senior year and had a season-high of 14 points that came in a game against something called Eureka, scored went 6-for-7 from three and scored a career-high 23 points for No. 11-seed Loyola-Chicago as college basketball’s latest Cinderella finished off their run to the Final Four with a 78-62 win over No. 9-seed Kansas State.

A No. 11-seed is the lowest-seeded team to ever reach a Final Four, and Loyola is just the fourth No. 11-seed to get to the Final Four. LSU did it in 1986, George Mason made it in 2006 and VCU reached the Final Four out of a play-in game in 2011.

Perhaps the most impressive part of this win was that it was never really in doubt. Kansas State led 3-2 for 17 seconds in the first half … and that’s it. The Ramblers opened the game on a 15-5 run, took a 36-24 lead into the break and led by as many as 23 points in the second half.

Perhaps this is what says it all — The Ramblers emptied their bench to let the walk-ons get some run.

In the Elite Eight.

Their bench players dribbled out the clock to send them to the Final Four.

For a team that needed game-winning jumpers in the final 10 seconds in the first three rounds of the tournament, Kansas State was the lowest seeded team that the Ramblers played in the tournament. I guess it’s fitting that they were the game they finally won comfortably.

And to be frank, this is the postseason run that we all needed this year.

Let’s start with the basics: Nobody wants to see Kansas State in the Final Four. I’m sorry Kansas State fans, but that’s the truth. This run has been fun, it might have saved Bruce Weber’s job and I’ve gained a whole new level of respect for the fight and the grit that guys like Barry Brown Jr., Cartier Diarra and Xavier Sneed play with.

But if you are going to give me the choice between seeing a miracle mid-major run to the final weekend of the college basketball season or a middling power conference program that happened to get hot against a lucky draw in the NCAA tournament, I’m taking the mid-major.

Every. Single. Time.

And I guarantee that I’m not the only one.

If we’re not going to get a blueblood, give me the little guy.

Especially when they are being led to glory by a 98-year old nun named Sister Jean.

That is the other part of this: Everything about this Loyola-Chicago team is good. They are what makes college basketball so special. They are why this event is the best sporting event in America. And they are making this run in the tournament in a year where the sport has been marred by scandal after scandal.

There was the FBI’s investigation into corruption in college basketball that resulted in assistant coaches at four programs getting arrested. There was the arrest of the three UCLA players that turned into an international incident covered by TMZ, CNN and FOX News when LaVar Ball stood up for his son and got into a war of words with Donald Trump. There were the accusations that were levied at Michigan State head coach Tom Izzo that he covered up sexual assaults committed by players within his program. There were the reports that leaked before the start of the NCAA tournament that tied players at myriad programs with taking impermissible from a disgraced NCAA agent, and then the controversy surrounding a report that Sean Miller was caught on a wiretap discussing a payment of $100,000 for Deandre Ayton.

Anyone paying attention to college basketball from afar would think that the sport is an absolute cesspool, and whether the fact that it is may or may not be true depending the way that you view amateurism and the ability of college athletes to earn money off of their likeness, the bottom-line is this: College basketball’s public image has never been worse.

Until now.

Now we have a team from the Missouri Valley — a league that Wichita State and Creighton left because it wasn’t good enough — heading to the Final Four. We have a mid-major program whose most famous member is their 98-year old chaplain. We have a program with a head coach that is so far from the glitz and glamour of $3,000 suits that he wears outfits that look like this.

This is why college basketball is the best.

Because things like this can happen.

Tonight, we are all Ramblers.