Daniel Ochefu, Halil Kanacevic

Villanova wins the Holy War, but St. Joe’s is still blowing close games

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The talent is there for St. Joseph’s to be as good as they want to be.

It was there last year as well, but the Hawks, for whatever reason, took home too many moral victories a year ago. What’s that mean? Well, it’s a nice way of saying that they were really good at being competitive and not so good at closing out games in which they had a late lead. The Hawks lost 14 games a year ago, and in 11 of them, they held a second half lead.

The thinking was that this year would be different. This is now an experienced, veteran team, as they returned everyone from last year’s 20-win campaign.

That’s why Tuesday’s 65-61 loss to Villanova is so disheartening.

Let’s ignore, for a second, that the Wildcats are St. Joe’s biggest rival and a fellow member of the Big 5. (This game is called the Holy War, after all.)

The Hawks had this game all but won. After Langston Galloway had hit his sixth three of the game with 2:16 remaining, St. Joe’s was up 61-56. But after two James Bell free throws, Halil Kanacevic turned the ball over. That led to a layup from Daniel Ochefu at the other end of the floor. On the ensuing possession, Kanacevic missed two free throws, which meant that when the Hawks lost track of Bell defensively, his three ball with 34 seconds left gave Villanova a 63-61 lead.

And that’s when things got really bad.

St. Joe’s called a timeout with 26 seconds left, but when they couldn’t get a shot off of the set that Martelli drew up in the timeout, they were forced to call another time out — their last of the game — with 11 seconds on the clock. That play resulted in Carl Jones running off of a high-ball screen from Galloway and kicking the ball out to 6-foot-9 CJ Aiken, who is a wanna-be jump-shooter that cannot dribble the ball. He got trapped, Jones came over to save him, and eventually the Hawks got lucky when the ball happened to go out of bounds off of Villanova with 3.5 seconds left.

On the ensuing inbounds, the Hawks were unable to get the ball in and Kanacevic was forced to try and bounce the ball off of the Villanova defender, which didn’t go well; it bounced off of him before going out of bounds.

Villanova ball.

And after two James Bell free throws, game over.

These are the games that St. Joe’s was supposed to be able to win this season.

If they want a real chance at winning the Atlantic 10 this season — which is as tough, deep and balanced as it has been in a long time — this needs to be a turning point. Every game in league play is going to be close. They cannot afford to salt away wins.

(As an aside, if you make the decision to flip a double-bird at the crowd on the road while playing in a game on national television, you probably shouldn’t choke away the game down the stretch. If anyone reading this PSA knows Halil Kanacevic, please pass this message along. Thank you.)

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

Sun Belt approves new scheduling format

Sun Belt Conference
Sun Belt Conference
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With an 11-member setup the Sun Belt Conference has played a 20-game conference schedule the last couple of years, which may be seen as a positive when it comes to determining the regular season champion (home-and-home between every team). But for a conference that spans from North Carolina (Appalachian State) to Texas (UT-Arlington, Texas State) travel was far from easy in that setup.

And with Coastal Carolina joining next season, it was clear that the league needed to do something with its scheduling.

Thursday the Sun Belt members approved an 18-game conference schedule, which will begin with the 2016-17 season when the league consists of 12 members. Included in the agreement is the assignment of travel partners (similar to setups in the Pac-12 and Ivy League), and teams playing no more than three consecutive conference games on the road.

Schools will also be guaranteed at least five weekend home games during conference play, and there will be no more weekends in which teams play conference games both home and away (thus cutting down on travel). Obviously with the addition of Coastal Carolina the Sun Belt needed to make some changes in their scheduling, and this week the conference made the moves they needed to make.

Former Wichita State assistant returns as a consultant

Chris Jans, Gregg Marshall
Associated Press
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Prior to a one-year stint as the head coach coach at Bowling Green that came to an end in early April as a result of an incident at a Bowling Green restaurant, Chris Jans was a member of Gregg Marshall’s coaching staff at Wichita State from 2007-14. During those seven seasons Jans was a key figure as the Shockers made the progression to a respected national power.

Jans is back in Wichita, with Paul Suellentrop of the Wichita Eagle reporting Thursday that he’s serving as a consultant to the program. Jans’ consulting agreement runs for 45 days, which the school can renew, and he’ll be paid $10,000 for the work. While Jans isn’t allowed to do any coaching, he can watch practices and provide Marshall and the coaching staff with his observations.

“He will be able to consult with the coaching staff, only on what he observes in practice,” said Darron Boatright, WSU deputy athletics director. “By NCAA rule, a consultant is not allowed to have communication with student-athletes … not about basketball-related activities or performance.”

While Jans (who according to the story has served in a similar role for another school) can’t do any coaching in this role, his return does give Marshall another trusted voice to call upon when needed. Wichita State bid farewell to an assistant coach this spring with Steve Forbes being hired as the head coach at East Tennessee State, with his position being filled by former Sunrise Christian Academy coach Kyle Lindsted.

h/t ShockerHoops.net