Mike Aresco

Does it really make sense for the hoops schools to leave the Big East?

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The Big East’s seven basketball only schools — St. John’s, Georgetown, Villanova, Marquette, Seton Hall, Providence and DePaul — are in the midst of discussing whether or not they should break away from what’s left of their once dominant hoops league.

What will they do from there?

Dissolve the Big East (they would need a two-thirds vote for that to happen, something that seems impossible now that Temple is a voting member) and start a new league? Bring in the likes of George Mason and Creighton?

Or will they join forces with the Atlantic 10 to form a 21 team league?

Or maybe they’ll continue trying to develop a national basketball conference, folding in the likes of Gonzaga and St. Mary’s?

At this point, that decision is a ways down the road. The first question that needs to be answered is whether or not it makes sense for them to leave in the first place. The Big East is trying to lock down a new TV deal, and a recent report from CBSSports.com stated that the league was expected to get between $60-80 million for their rights. That breaks down to somewhere between $1 and $1.5 million for the Big East’s hoop schools. By comparison, the Atlantic 10’s TV deal earns each member institution about $350,000.

Will the Big East’s Catholic school be able to generate much more than that?

Think about it. St. John’s hasn’t been relevant nationally since the days of Ron Artest, Erick Barkley and Felipe Lopez. Providence has been to two NCAA tournaments since 1997 and none since 2004. Seton Hall has been to three tournaments since 1994. DePaul has been to two since 1992. Villanova, Georgetown and Marquette are all quality programs with good head coaches, but how does maintaining an associated with the other four programs help them when it means turning their back on a conference that also includes Cincinnati, UConn, Memphis and Temple?

Is Tulane really that much worse than Fordham?

Is it about saving a brand that all-but went out the door with the likes of Syracuse, Pitt and West Virginia? Is it about maintaining a level of pride; saving face? Is salvaging what little respect the league has left worth upwards of seven figures annually?

The bottom-line is this: the Big East’s basketball schools are screwed, no matter how you slice it. There is no good answer here. So they are left with a choice: try to remain aligned with a conference that still generates football revenue, or go it alone and risk sliding even further off the national radar.

And if they can make more money in a new league, they’ll make the leap. If not, they’ll stay.

Once you get past the romanticized soap opera that is realignment, it really is that simple.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

No. 17 Arizona erases double-digit deficit to beat UCLA

Arizona coach Sean Miller reacts to a foul call during the first half of Arizona's NCAA college basketball game against UCLA, Friday, Feb 12, 2016, in Tucson, Ariz. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)
(AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)
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Allonzo Trier scored 15 of his 18 points in the second half and Parker Jackson-Cartwright scored 16 points in his second career start as No. 17 Arizona knocked off UCLA, 81-75, in Tucson on Friday night.

UCLA was up by as much as 11 points in the first half and took a ten point lead into half time, but in the second half, the Bruins were eventually done in by foul trouble and the stronger front line of the Wildcats.

Ryan Anderson and Kaleb Tarczewski were dominant down the stretch. The duo combined to score 12 of the last 23 point for the Wildcats, including the bucket that put the Wildcats ahead for the first time since early in the first half. Off of a missed free throw, UCLA’s Thomas Welsh battled with Tarczewski for the rebound, but when Welsh finally seemed to gain control of the loose ball, Anderson knocked it out of his hands and bullied through Jonah Bolden for a layup.

All told, those two combined for 20 points and 27 boards, seven of which were offensive. They also managed to foul out both Welsh and Tony Parker, although some of the calls that went against UCLA down the stretch were questionable.

The win keeps Arizona within a game of first place Oregon in the Pac-12 standings and tied for second with No. 23 USC, who will be visiting the McKale Center on Sunday night.

No. 23 USC falls at Arizona State

Arizona State head coach Bobby Hurley applauds the efforts of his team during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Arizona, Sunday, Jan. 3, 2016, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ralph Freso)
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No. 23 USC missed a golden opportunity to make up a game in the Pac-12 standings on Friday night.

No. 11 Oregon lost to Colorado on Thursday night, dropping back into a tie for first place in the league with the Trojans, a game ahead of No. 17 Arizona. But USC fell at Arizona State, 74-67, keeping them a game off of the pace that the Ducks have set.

The loss is even more painful when you consider that, on Sunday, the Trojans will be making the trip to Tucson to take on Arizona. The Wildcats are not what we have become accustomed to seeing under Sean Miller, but they are still a top 25 team and the McKale Center is still one of the toughest places in the country to get a win.

Thanks to Friday’s loss, instead of entering McKale with an outside chance of taking over sole possession of first place in the league, USC will have top hope they don’t fall two games off the pace.

As far as the game itself was concerned, USC committed 17 turnovers, shot 2-for-11 from three and gave up 16 offensive rebounds to Arizona State. That’s how you lose a game where you shoot better than 51 percent from the floor. USC was just never able to consistently get out into transition, and that caused them to struggle executing in the half court.

Nikola Jovanovic led the way with 25 points and 15 boards for USC.

Tra Holder’s 20 points made the difference for Arizona State, who kept themselves within striking distance of an at-large bid with the win.