Mike Aresco Big East commissioner

What’s next for the Big East if they lose more members?


Unless you’ve been away from all forms of technology over the last 24 hours, you’ve heard reports that Maryland is in the process of deciding which conference would be best for the Terps’ future.

Is it the ACC, of which they’ve been a member since its inception in 1953, or the Big Ten, with its lucrative conference television network and a first tier media rights deal that’s due to be renegotiated in the near future (current deal expires in 2017)?

A Maryland move would set off a chain of events that would once again leave the Big East in a tenuous position.

Those reports have Rutgers as the Big Ten’s 14th member should Maryland make the move, not to mention the general thought that the ACC would grab Connecticut to be its 14th all-sports member (not counting Notre Dame here since they will remain a football independent).

The question for Big East commissioner Mike Aresco and the presidents he represents: what course of action will they take should Rutgers and Connecticut leave?

First, this news comes at the worst possible time for the Big East as its in the process of negotiating a new television deal. A big reason why Rutgers would appeal to the Big Ten in this scenario is also why their departure would deliver a major blow to the Big East: television sets.

Feel free to argue about just how many people in the NY/NJ area “care” about Rutgers athletics, but that’s not the point. If the Big Ten can take its network to cable/satellite providers in the area with Rutgers in tow, it becomes easier to convince providers to make the Big Ten Network even more accessible to subscribers.

Losing Rutgers, and by extension Connecticut, puts the Big East in a tenuous position when it comes to those television sets. They’ll need to make additions with football in mind, as the departures would drop the conference to 11 football members (including Navy). So who would they go after? Dan Wetzel of Yahoo! Sports offered up the following:

BYU and Air Force both remain potential additions either for football only or even full membership. Army could be a possibility – Navy is already coming in 2015. A western school such as Nevada, UNLV or Fresno State could be a football-only candidate to balance things geographically.

Or maybe in an effort to replace UConn’s presence in New England, the league goes after the University of Massachusetts or attempts to bolster its basketball by adding Xavier or Virginia Commonwealth or, well, at that point just about anyone and anything and anywhere is on the table.

It was one thing to sell the fact that adding Memphis and Temple will help lessen the blow of losing Pittsburgh and Syracuse to the ACC. But if UConn, which has won three national titles as part of the Big East, were to hit the road the Big East would have to address the basketball side of things with at least one of the spots.

Do they look to the Atlantic 10? You’d almost have to if you’re the Big East, given who remains in Conference USA, and UMass would help as they would bring both basketball and football to the table.

And it would be foolish to expect the remaining schools in the conference (meaning primarily Cincinnati, Louisville and USF) to sit around and merely hope for another league to come calling; those backchannels are likely already being worked. Good luck selling a “stable” conference to prospective members.

Realignment has left the Big East in the position of picking at the leftovers in hopes of putting together a solid menu. But at this point it’s tough to see many attractive choices left on the table.

And if conference commissioners were to fully engage in a race to form those “superconferences” that were rumored to be on the way? The Big East model would most likely end up looking quite similar to what the Atlantic 10 has, and while that’s not “death” you’ll have a hard time convincing fans otherwise.

Raphielle also writes for the NBE Basketball Report and can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

Labissiere scores 16 as top-ranked Kentucky beats BU 82-62

Eric Johnson, Isaiah Briscoe
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LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) Freshman center Skal Labissiere scored 16 points to lead top-ranked Kentucky past Boston University 82-62 on Tuesday night.

The Wildcats (5-0) used a big second half to overcome Boston U. in their season debut at No. 1 in The Associated Press Top 25 poll. One day after taking over the top spot, Kentucky struggled to put away the Terriers early but outscored them 42-29 in the second half.

Labissiere finished 7 of 13 from the field and grabbed seven rebounds. Tyler Ulis added 15 points, and Alex Poythress had 14 points and 10 rebounds off the bench for his second straight double-double.

Jamal Murray scored 12 points and Isaiah Briscoe had 11. Kentucky, which spent all of last season ranked No. 1, scored 58 points in the paint and closed with a 22-9 run.

Boston University (2-3) got 15 points from John Papale. Nathan Dieudonne and Kyle Foreman scored 11 apiece.

The Wildcats raced out to a 10-0 lead 3 minutes into the game, but Boston University settled down after making its first basket and kept the score close in the first half by hitting five shots from long range.

The Terriers led 34-33 with 2 minutes remaining in the first half, but the Wildcats scored the last six points of the period to regain the lead.

Labissiere paced the Wildcats with 11 points in the first half, followed by Murray with 10.


Kentucky: The Wildcats improved to 216-28 as the top-ranked team in the country and have won 61 of their last 64 games while holding the top spot. Under coach John Calipari, Kentucky is 63-5 as the top-ranked team in the AP poll.

Boston University: The Terriers fell to 0-5 against Kentucky. … Boston University missed its first four shots and didn’t score its first basket until the 16:55 mark of the first half. … Dieudonne, a graduate of Louisville Trinity, was Kentucky’s Mr. Basketball in 2012.


Kentucky plays Friday against South Florida at the Hoophall Miami Invitational.

Boston University plays Saturday at Binghamton.

Division III William Paterson forfeits game to protest coach’s firing

William Paterson Athletics
William Paterson Athletics
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William Paterson, a Division III basketball program in New Jersey, forfeited a game on Tuesday night to protest the firing of their head coach, Jose Rebimbas.

Rebimbas, a player for the 1990 Seton Hall team that reached the national title game, had been with the program for 20 years, amassing nearly 400 wins, winning six league titles and reaching nine NCAA tournaments. He announced his firing earlier this week on FaceBook, and the players on his team responded by boycotting Tuesday night’s matchup with Ramapo.

Dylan Burns, a William Paterson student that does play-by-play for the school’s athletic teams, tweeted that the basketball players came out of the locker room for layups lines, took off their warmups, threw them in a pile on the court and walked off the floor.

The following screengrabs from instagram videos that have since been removed show the players leaving the floor:

Screengrab via Instagram

And the jerseys piled in the middle of the court:

Screengrab via Instagram

The crowd at the game can be heard cheering when it is announced that the game has been forfeited.

Rebimbas wrote the following on FaceBook over the weekend:

“It is with great sadness and extreme frustration that after today I will not be coaching the basketball team at William Paterson University. WP has been my home and family for more than 20 years and yet the University has taken action to remove me from the service I love. People I have trusted and served with have defied logic and are pursing my termination because of a misunderstanding over a facility rental fee for a camp that I run.”

“These actions come despite the University hearing officer determining that termination was not warranted. The University has unfairly and illegally taken my right to coach and mentor the student-athletes I love. I am prepared to fight the actions of William Paterson University and restore my good name and that of the program.”