Luke Cothron, the latest casualty of the NCAA


Luke Cothron is the latest example of everything that is wrong with the NCAA.

A four-star recruit in the Class of 2010, Cothron is currently at his fifth college, six if you include NC State, who he originally committed to in high school.

He originally signed with Auburn, but was ruled a non-qualifier. Cothron had a short stint at UMass and an even shorter stint at New Orleans before heading to the College of Southern Idaho for a year and Northwest Florida for this season.

The problem, however, is the time that he spent at UNO. You see, head coach Joe Pasternack thought he could pull a fast one the NCAA. Since the Privateers were moving to Division III after the season, his players were going to be allowed to transfer without penalty. So he convinced Cothron to enroll for the second semester as an audition for bigger programs looking to land a talented power forward.

So Cothron enrolled on a Monday night, played in a game that Tuesday – all of six minutes – and then … he was told the plan wasn’t going to work. As he told Gary Parrish of CBSSports.com, the school figured out that since Cothron was actually enrolled at UMass, he would have to sit out a year before getting eligible at UNO.

Because, you know, those are the standard NCAA rules that everyone knows and hates.

UNO didn’t get a waiver from the NCAA. They didn’t even apply for one. He spent a grand total of two days – and six minutes played — as a member of the team.

And now that’s coming back to bite Cothron, because those six minutes technically count as his freshman season, which means that the one year he spent at CSI is his sophomore season. So now he is forced to sit out at Northwest Florida, because it’s a junior college and athletes aren’t allowed to play at junior colleges after their sophomore season.

All Cothron needs is someone from New Orleans to pick up the phone, call the NCAA, and tell them that they made a mistake. It wasn’t Cothron’s fault. He trusted a coach and the coach had bad information.

But Pasternack has since moved on, and the compliance officer that cleared the decision is gone, as well. Athletic Director Derek Morel apparently can’t be bothered to help Cothron out, either, as Parrish said it has been at least three months since Morel was informed of the problem.

So Cothron sits in basketball purgatory, able to play but ineligible to suit up.

And, frankly, that is a steaming pile of horse manure.

It’s also a perfect example for why so many people despise the NCAA.

Look, Cothron isn’t perfect. In fact, he’s a pretty long way from being what you would call a ‘model’ student. He didn’t qualify academically and he’s been to five schools in less than three years. But the point of college athletics, at its core, is to help kids from disadvantaged situations use physical gifts to better their lives, whether that means getting them straight to the NBA or simply allowing them a chance to get an education.

And because of a stupid thought process from people that Cothron is supposed to be able to trust, Cothron may not have the chance to prove himself deserving of a scholarship.

(Let’s not forgot Mr. Derek Morel here, who isn’t making the effort to pick up the phone and help Cothron out. That ticks me off. If it ticks you off as well, his phone number is 504-280-6102. Let’s see if he picks up the phone when you call.)

It’s hard to believe given the complexity of the NCAA’s rulebook, but there are still kids that manage to slip through the cracks, which is why they need a common sense rule, a clause that simply says, ‘Hey, we messed this one up, you’re good to go.’

No one’s perfect, but it’s incredibly unfair to punish a kid for someone else’s mistakes.

Make this right.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

Texas lands commitment from top 100 center

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James Banks announced on Thursday that he has committed to Texas, joining Jacob Young in Shaka Smart’s first recruiting class as the head coach of the Longhorns.

Banks is an interesting prospect. A 6-foot-10 center from Georgia, Banks is a still-developing prospect that was recruited more on his potential than his immediate ability.

“James Banks emerged as a good low post prospect this spring and summer,” NBC Recruiting Analyst Scott Phillips said. “With a good set of hands, some offensive potential and a frame that can add weight, Banks is a nice upside grab for Texas.”

He’s probably a few years away from having a major impact in the Big 12, but he may not have that much time to develop. Cameron Ridley, Prince Ibeh and Conner Lamert all graduate after this season, meaning that Banks is going to have to contribute immediately when he sets foot on the Austin campus for the 2016-17 season.

Texas has three commitments in the Class of 2015. Smart convinced Kerwin Roach and Eric Davis to remain committed to the program when he took over for Rick Barnes while he landed a commitment from Tevin Mack, who pledged to Smart when he was at VCU.

Memphis guard could miss season with shoulder injury

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Memphis just cannot catch a break.


It’s to the point where I almost feel bad for Josh Pastner.

Today, CBSSports.com reported that Kedren Johnson, a 6-foot-4 point guard that was on track towards being an all-SEC point guard at Vanderbilt, could end up missing the season due to a shoulder injury. If he can handle the pain he can avoid surgery and play with the injury, but at the very least, Johnson is going to be less than his best.

Johnson averaged 6.7 points and 2.7 assists last season for the Tigers. He sat out 2013-14 after leaving Vanderbilt and entered last season incredibly out of shape. There was hope that he would be able to make a bigger impact this season and help fill the void at the point guard spot.

This news comes on the heels of Memphis finding out that Jaylen Fisher is heading to UNLV. Who’s Jaylen Fisher? Well, he’s a point guard and top 40 recruit from Memphis that was Pastner’s No. 1 recruiting target that opted to leave the city for his college hoops instead of play for the Tigers.

That’s a bad sign, but not quite as bad as Memphis losing star center Austin Nichols — another local kid — to a transfer over the summer. Nichols transferred to Virginia.