LIU-Brooklyn falls to 0-2, so what’s going on?

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As if the offseason wasn’t bad enough for LIU-Brooklyn, the regular season hasn’t been any better.

The Blackbirds, the overwhelming favorite to repeat as Northeast Conference champions, fell to 0-2 on the season with a 98-94 loss on the road to Lafayette. It comes on the heels of a season-opening 77-74 loss to Morehead State in a virtual home game in the Barclays Center.

The problem wasn’t scoring — as is always the case when you score 94. Four of five starters finished in double-figures for LIU, led by Jamal Olaswere’s 25 points and 11 rebounds. Last season’s NEC Player of the Year, Julian Boyd, had 13 and both C.J. Garner and Jason Brickman had 19. Brickman had eight assists.

The problem, as you can imagine, was defense. Dan Trist dropped 30 for the Leopards, going 14-for-18 from the field. Seth Hinrichs scored 20 in the win as well.

If there’s one consistent problem through two games, it’s definitely the bench. The Blackbirds have a combined 19 points coming off the pine, with Gerrell Martin’s six against Lafayette leading the way. The team legitimately goes eight-deep, but just hasn’t gotten any offensive support from that group.

The losses themselves are troubling because these were two winnable games for the Blackbirds. They were playing a Morehead State team in their first game under new-coach Sean Woods, then a game against a Lafayette team that’s projected to finish in the middle of the Patriot League. This is all after Boyd, Garner and Olaswere were involved in an on-campus fight that resulted in arrests, charges and a two-game conference suspension.

LIU’s NCAA Tournament berth wasn’t going to hinge on their non-conference schedule. They play their next two games against Maryland and Kentucky, so an 0-4 record in the Barclays Center Classic is now a distinct possibility, which would be a massive disappointment. After the tournament, the Blackbirds get a second shot at Lafayette on Dec. 1, as well as games against MAAC favorite Manhattan, Rice and Seton Hall. So while wins over those three would be a boost, the tournament was where they could make the most non-conference noise with their upcoming games.

But after two season-opening losses, there’s not a lot of confidence in this team that they can even contend with the Terrapins and the Wildcats.

What’s worse? The Blackbirds lose the three players mentioned for the first two conference games, against Sacred Heart and Quinnipiac on the road. Those won’t be easy.

There needs to be some major changes within coach Jack Perri’s squad. This was supposed to be their year. So far, it’s been the year they’d like to restart.

David Harten is the editor of The Backboard Chronicles. You can follow him on Twitter at @David_Harten.

Nevada gets transfer commitment from Omaha forward Tre’Shawn Thurman

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Nevada continues to build its roster through transfers as the Wolf Pack added Omaha forward Tre’Shawn Thurman on Thursday.

The 6-foot-7 Thurman will have to sit out one season before playing his senior season but he is coming off of a very good campaign for the Mavericks. The versatile forward put up 13.8 points and 7.8 rebounds per game while shooting 49 percent from the field.

One of the Summit League’s better players the last two seasons, Thurman should be a solid rotation forward for Nevada as he has a chance to be a breakout player with one more year of development. If Thurman can improve his 25 percent three-point shooting then he could be a major factor for Nevada.

D-League salaries, two-way contracts increase NBA Draft early entries

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Yesterday, I wrote a piece about how it’s dumb to criticize players for entering the NBA Draft without costing themselves their collegiate eligibility when the NCAA’s new NBA Draft rules are specifically designed for said players to be able to do that.

In that column, I mentioned that D-League salaries are on the rise and that the NBA’s new CBA instituted something called “two-way contracts,” and I wanted a chance to elaborate and clarify a couple of the points that I made.

Let’s start with the “two-way contracts,” which NBA teams each get two of. They are essentially a retainer that those teams can place on younger players they want to be the 16th and 17th men on their roster, holding their rights as they bounce between the D-League — where they will likely spend the majority of the year — and the NBA. The catch is that those players have to have less than three years service as a professional, and the point of it is to provide a financial incentive for younger players with the potential to reach the NBA to remain stateside while allowing those NBA teams to develop them.

That financial incentive is fairly large, as well: Two-way players will make $75,000 guaranteed and will be able to make up to $275,000, depending on the amount of time they spend with the NBA team.

That means there are an extra 60 jobs this season that can end up paying players with less than three years of professional basketball experience upwards of a quarter-of-a-million dollars.

That’s not a bad starting salary.

The other point that I wanted to address is the rising D-League salaries which, technically, will not be rising. There are still going to be Tier A and Tier B players, who make $26,000 and $20,000 respectively. But the NBA has something called affiliate players, which each of the now-25 NBA teams with a D-League affiliate can pay up to $50,000 for training camp. NBA teams are allowed a maximum of four affiliate players, who will still make their $26,000 salary from their D-League team.

In other words, that’s 100 more jobs available in the United States where a professional basketball player can make $76,000, and that’s before you consider that the five NBA teams that do not yet have a D-League affiliate will still have to play players to get them into training camp.

That $76,000 is not a life-changing amount of money. Neither is the $275,000 that a two-way contract can pay. But it’s a pretty damn good paycheck to make for an entry-level job into the industry that you always dreamed of being in.

Athletes have an unbelievably small window where they can capitalize monetarily on their gifts.

If a 21-year old sophomore decides that he wants to continue to develop his game and chase his NBA dream by making $76,000 as a D-League player, is that really all that crazy?

After all, 135 of the 450 players, or 30 percent of the roster spots, on NBA’s opening night were taken by guys that had spent time in the D-League.

There’s more than one way to make a dream come true.

A record $439 million was bet on basketball in March in Las Vegas

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The month of March was quite friendly to Las Vegas.

According to ESPN, more money was bet on basketball during the month of March than in any month in the state’s regulated sports betting history.

And while the numbers produced by Las Vegas books don’t separate college and professional basketball betting, the money coming in on college hoops is pretty clear: $439 million was bet on basketball in March, more than double the $213 million bet on the sport in February.

It was profitable, too.

Those Vegas books kept more than $40 million dollars of the money that was gambled on basketball, which shattered the previous record of roughly $28 million in winnings.

Gonzaga lands their first post-Final Four commitment

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Gonzaga capitalized on their run to the national title game by landing a commitment from French point guard Joel Ayayi, who announced the news on twitter.

Ayayi is an interesting long-term prospect, according to Draft Express. He has the size and the frame to eventually be a significant contributor in the college game, but he’s raw. His handle needs work, as does his ability to create off the dribble and find teammates off of the bounce.

That said, he’s 6-foot-4 with a 6-foot-7 wingspan and the ability to shoot it from the perimeter, and if Gonzaga can do anything, it’s develop players that enter their program.

VIDEO: Zion Williamson, top three prospect in 2018, breaks defender’s ankles

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Zion Williamson, one of the most sought-after recruits in college basketball, had himself a highlight-worthy moment at the Adidas Gauntlet event in Dallas over the weekend, breaking a defender’s ankles before hitting a three.