Burning Questions: Which All-American will flop?

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Real, live college basketball games start on Friday, and with all of our glorious preseason content finally finished, this week we will be providing you with water cooler fodder as we roll through a series of Burning Question. You can read them all right here.

Which player on one of the All-American teams is the most likely to flop this year?

Mike Moser, UNLV (Rob Dauster): Moser is coming off of a fantastic season for the Rebels, and under normal circumstances, I’d be trumpeting his potential heading into the season. But this isn’t a normal year for UNLV; the Rebels have a front line that’s absolutely stacked, so much so that Moser may end up playing the three this year. That would take away the mismatch advantage he has as a power forward. If he struggles with a move to the wing, he’ll have to share even more minutes with Anthony Bennett and Khem Birch. Will that cut into his production?

Isaiah Canaan, Murray State

  • (Raphielle Johnson): I think the word “flop” in this question is a bit harsh, because I can’t see Canaan’s game pulling a “Vlade Divac” this year. However the loss of perimeter helpers Jewuan Long and Donte Poole, as well as Zay Jackson’s driving in a Walmart parking lot (he can’t play this season as a result) means that Canaan will have even more eyes focused on his every move. I’m expecting some teams to throw junk defenses (box and 1, etc.) at the Racers in hopes of slowing Canaan down, but the bigger issue will be the loss of some important sidekicks.
  • (Troy Machir): It’s close to impossible for Isaiah Canaan to replicate the success he and the Murray State Racer had last season. They were the last unbeaten team in the country. Only the National Championship-winning Kentucky Wildcats had less losses than Murray State. A lot of things will have to bounce Murray State’s way in order for Canaan and the Racers to meet the lofty expectations awaiting them. Murray State lost four important pieces over the off-season, three to graduation and one, sophomore Zay Jackson, to a season-long suspension. I do think Canaan will have a very strong year, but he won’t be able to surprise us like he did last year, and I don’t think he has the talent around him to do something truly special.

Michael Snaer, Florida State (David Harten): He’s as legit a shooter as there is, and he’s on a team that values him. He’s one of the best players in the ACC, averaging 14 points per game. But that’s not all that matters when it comes to being an All-American. The team itself plays a part. Big man Bernard James is gone. As is Snaer’s backcourt mate Luke Loucks. Unless another scoring threat emerges (it’s worth noting Ian Miller’s 10.3 ppg returns), Snaer could face a ton of double teams. And his production could drop.

Peyton Siva, Louisville (Daniel Martin): Siva was chosen to be the Big East Preseason Player of the Year and, considering his performance in the 2012 Big East and NCAA tournaments, that’s warranted. But we saw two different Sivas over the course of last season, one who led Louisville to the Final Four in March and the one who struggled through some doldrums during the middle of the year. Which one will predominate in 2012-13? The fate of the Louisville offense depends on his production, but there is the possibility that he could run into struggles at some point this year. As goes Siva, so go the Cardinals.

Marcus Paige, Joel Berry lead No. 9 North Carolina past No. 2 Maryland

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CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — He’s back.

For the first time this season — and for the first time in more than a year that he hasn’t been hampered with some kind of foot or ankle injury — Marcus Paige donned a North Carolina jersey, and it didn’t take him long to find the form that made him the Preseason National Player of the Year.

On the first Tar Heel possession, Paige came off of a ball-screen, drove the lane and found Kennedy Meeks at the rim for a layup. Not 30 seconds later, he came off of a down screen and buried a three. Paige would finish with 20 points and five assists as No. 9 North Carolina put together a fairly resounding win over No. 2 Maryland in the Dean Dome on Tuesday night, winning 89-81.

Paige finished 7-for-12 from the floor and 4-for-5 from beyond the arc, hitting a number of threes in the second half that helped hold off a Maryland push sparked by their own all-american point guard, Melo Trimble.

Trimble was erratic early on, committing three turnovers in the first six minutes and eight on the night, but it was his play at the end of the first half and early second half that kept North Carolina from blowing their doors. At one point, Maryland was down 32-19 and in danger of getting run out of Tobacco Road.

In total, Trimble finished with 23 points and 12 assists, hitting four big threes during that stretch. He either scored or assisted on 11 of Maryland’s first 12 second half field goals.

As good as Paige was, the bigger story may actually be Joel Berry II. He took two dumb threes in the first half — which played a role in Maryland being able to make this a game — and he missed a few free throws late, but overall he was terrific. He finished with 14 points and five assists, making 3-of-5 threes and turning the ball over just twice. He’s clearly beat Nate Britt out at the point guard spot, and his ability to take pressure off of Paige as a secondary ball-handler and playmaker is huge.

(More to come from Chapel Hill…)

VIDEO: Melo Trimble drops Nate Britt with a crossover

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North Carolina is hosting No. 2 Maryland in a heated contest in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge. Terps sophomore guard Melo Trimble is playing very well and part of his performance was dropping North Carolina’s Nate Britt with a crossover in the second half.

(H/T: The Cauldron)