Men's Basketball Team 2007

Delaware embraces standing as the hunted in the CAA

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ARLINGTON, Va – Recruiting is a fickle science.

As much as any coach or recruiting pundit wants to claim that they can watch an AAU game and pick out who will be the best collegiate players, so much of a program’s recruiting success can come down to dumb luck. Were you in the gym on the right day to see the right kid, or did you give up on a player too quickly after one poor performance.

The former happened to Delaware head coach Monte’s Ross, and the latter nearly did.

Jamelle Hagins is the best big man in the CAA, and there really isn’t much of a discussion to have on the matter. The 6-foot-9 senior is coming off of a season where he averaged a double-double, 12.4 points and 11.1 rebounds, while swatting away 3.0 shots on a nightly basis. But the first time Ross saw Hagins play, he had no interest in the Roanoke, VA, native.

“I was in Vegas and my assistant sent me to see him, and he played three minutes,” Ross said at CAA media day last week. “I’m like, ‘I would like to like him, but he didn’t play, so I don’t know.'”

Luckily for Ross, he had a coaching staff that believed in Hagins, enough so that the same assistant made a trip down to Roanoke over Christmas, a trip that Ross responded to by saying “I think you’re wasting your time, but if you want to, go ahead and watch him.” Eventually, his staff convinced Ross to give Hagins another look, and they offered a scholarship. Hagins picked the Blue Hens over Radford.

“It was the best recruiting trip that he twisted my arm to go on,” Ross said. “That’s recruiting, though. It came down to us and Radford for him, and now he’ll be the best big man in the league.”

And that’s not the only stroke of luck Delaware had on the recruiting trail. At one AAU tournament, Ross and his staff, on the trail for a shooter, happened to walk by a court and see a kid hit a three. By the time they reached the other end of the court, the same kid had hit another three. They decided at that point to stop and check out the rest of the game, and the kid eventually went for 40 points. His name was Kyle Anderson, and he was a 6-foot-2 guard from Illinois. He didn’t have a profile on and he wasn’t graded as a recruit on

Anderson started 30 games for the Blue Hens as a freshman and averaged 8.9 points.

It hasn’t all been luck for Ross, however, as the biggest reason his team was picked to finish second in the CAA are the two smallest guys on the floor, Devon Saddler and Jarvis Threatt.

Saddler is a proven scorer; he averaged 18.8 points as a sophomore. Where Saddler needs to improve is in the efficiency department. With the talent surrounding him on the roster, shooting 39.1% from the floor and turning the ball over 3.2 times per game (for an assist-to-turnover ratio of 0.55:1) is no longer acceptable.

“One of the things that we’ve really talked to him about this summer was, ‘You have to cut down on your turnovers,'” Ross said. “We consider a bad shot a turnover, so be more selective in the shots that you take.”

Ross wants to see Saddler embrace the role that Charles Jenkins played for Hofstra and Damian Lillard player for Weber State. Those guys not only put up massive numbers, but they did so while posting efficiency stats that made Kenpom salivate. “That will allow him to elevate his game,” Ross said. “Maybe he didn’t fully trust it when he was younger, but now he trusts the talent around him and I think that will lead him to making better decisions and also taking better shots.”

One of the guys that Saddler will need to learn to trust is Threatt, who capped off his freshman year in dramatic style. Over the last eight games of the season, Threatt averaged 19.6 points while getting to the line an incredible 92 times during that stretch.

It will be interesting to see how Ross will spread shots and touches throughout his lineup, as both Saddler and Threat are talents that like to have the ball in their hands. Too much talent is a good problem to have, however.

It’s why the Blue Hens find themselves in a unique position heading into the season: as “the targeted and not the targeter.”

“It’s [a different position for us], but it’s a position I like better than being at the bottom,” Ross said.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

Guy V. Lewis, coach of Phi Slama Jama teams, dies at 93

Guy Lewis
Associated Press
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HOUSTON (AP) Former University of Houston men’s basketball coach Guy V. Lewis, best known for leading the Phi Slama Jama teams of the 1980s, has died. He was 93.

He died at a retirement facility in Kyle, Texas, on Thanksgiving morning surrounded by family, the school said Thursday.

Lewis coached the Cougars for 30 years. He guided Houston to back-to-back NCAA title games in 1983 and ’84 but never won the national championship, losing to N.C. State in the 1983 final on Lorenzo Charles’ last-second shot, one of the NCAA Tournament’s greatest upsets and most memorable plays.

“It feels awful,” Lewis said after that game. “I’ve never lost a game that didn’t feel that way, but this one was terrible.”

Lewis, who helped lead the integration of college basketball in the South by recruiting Elvin Hayes and Don Chaney to Houston, was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013.

Known for plaid jackets and wringing his hands with a red polka-dot towel during games, Lewis compiled a 592-279 record at Houston, guiding the Cougars to 27 consecutive winning seasons from 1959-85. He was honored as the national coach of the year twice (1968 and `83) and led Houston to 14 NCAA Tournaments and five Final Fours.

Lewis had mostly avoided the spotlight since retiring in 1986. He suffered a stroke in February 2002 and had used a wheelchair in recent years.

He was known for putting together the “Game of the Century” at the Astrodome in 1968 between Houston and UCLA. It was the first regular-season game to be broadcast on national television. Houston defeated the Bruins in front of a crowd of more than 52,000, which, at that time, was the largest ever to watch an indoor basketball game.

Lewis attended the introductory news conference in December 2007 for Kevin Sumlin, the first black football coach in Houston history. It was a symbolic, significant appearance because Lewis signed Houston’s first two black basketball players and some of the first in the region in Hayes and Chaney in 1964, when programs were just starting to integrate.

Hayes and Chaney led the Cougars to the program’s first Final Four in 1967 but lost to Lew Alcindor’s UCLA team in the semifinal game.

“Basketball in the state of Texas and throughout the South is all due to coach Guy V. Lewis,” Hayes said in 2013. “He put everything on the line to step out and integrate his program. Not only that, he had vision to say: `Hey, we can play a game in the Houston Astrodome.’ Not only that, he just was such a motivator and such an innovator that created so many doors for the game of basketball to grow.”

Along with Hayes, Lewis also coached fellow All-Americans Hakeem Olajuwon and Clyde Drexler. The three were included on the NBA’s Top 50 greatest players list in 1996. Lewis and North Carolina’s Dean Smith were the only men to coach three players from that list while they were in college.

Players and CBS announcer Jim Nantz lobbied for years for Lewis to get into the Naismith Hall of Fame. When he finally received the honor in 2013 he made a rare public appearance. It was difficult for him to convey his thoughts in words in his later years because of aphasia from his strokes, so his daughter spoke on his behalf at the event to celebrate his induction.

“It’s pure joy and we’re not even upset that it took so long. … Dad is used to winning in overtime,” Sherry Lewis said.

Lewis announced his retirement during the 1985-86 season, and the Cougars finished 14-14, his first non-winning season since 1958-59.

Guy Vernon Lewis II was born in Arp, a town of fewer than 1,000 residents in northeast Texas. He became a flight instructor for the U.S. Army during World War II and enrolled at the University of Houston in 1946.

He joined the basketball team, averaged 21.1 points and led the Cougars to the Lone Star Conference championship. By the early 1950s, he was working as an assistant coach under Alden Pasche and took over when Pasche retired in 1956.

Funeral services are pending.

AP Sports Writer Chris Duncan contributed to this story.

Syracuse upsets No. 18 UConn as Tyler Lydon stars again

St Bonaventure Syracuse Basketball
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Michael Gbinije and Trevor Cooney combined for 34 points as Syracuse overcame an early 10-point deficit to knock off No. 18 UConn in the semifinals of the Battle 4 Atlantis, 79-76.

The talking point at the end of this game is probably going to end up being UConn’s decision not to foul Syracuse with 36 seconds left on the clock. Trevor Cooney dribbled out the clock and, with six seconds left, missed a 35-foot prayer, the offensive rebound getting corralled by Tyler Roberson, sealing the win.

But that’s not the real story here.

That would be Tyler Lydon, who suddenly looks like he may end up being the difference maker for this Syracuse team.

If you don’t know the name, I don’t blame you. Lydon was a low-end top 100 recruit that had been committed to the Orange for a long time. He’s not exactly a game-changing prospect, but he’s a perfect fit for Syracuse. At 6-foot-9, Lydon has the length to be a shot-blocker in the middle of the 2-3 zone — he entered Thursday averaging 3.3 blocks — but his biggest skill is his ability to shoot the ball from beyond the arc. When he plays the middle of that zone, when he is essentially the five for the Orange, they become incredibly difficult to matchup with defensively.

The question is whether or not he can consistently be that guy on the defensive end of the floor. Against UConn, Lydon had 16 points and 12 boards. Against Charlotte, he finished with 18 points, eight boards and six blocks. But neither the Huskies nor the 49ers have a big front line that crashes the offensive glass.

Lydon is great at using his length to make shots in the lane difficult, but at (a generous) 205 pounds, he may run into trouble against bigger, stronger front court players.

The perfect test?

Texas A&M, who the Orange will play in the title game on Friday.