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Twenty-five must-see non-conference games in 2012-13

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Throughout the month of October, CollegeBasketballTalk will be rolling out our previews for the 2012-2013 season. Check back at 9 a.m. and just after lunch every day, Monday-Friday, for a new preview item.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To look at the rest of The Lists we’ve published, click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.

The season is rapidly approaching, with less than two weeks to go before practices officially begin across the nation. So, what are some of the non-conference games that you should keep an eye on this season? Twenty-five such games are listed below including a couple surprises (tried to list a team no more than twice), but the game at the top of the list should surprise no one.

1. Kentucky at Louisville (December 29)
This game topping the list shouldn’t be a surprise, as the Wildcats and Cardinals are two of the teams expected to contend for a national title. Kentucky won both meetings last year, something that the Louisville players will be reminded of quite often. Youth vs. experience and two of the best coaches in the game makes for must-see entertainment at the KFC Yum! Center.

2. North Carolina at Indiana (November 27)
Given the heavy personnel losses that North Carolina suffered the team that shows up in Bloomington probably won’t look like the “finished” product come March. But a game like this can be an excellent learning tool for Roy Williams’ team as they’ll take on the team many have labeled as the favorite to win the national title. North Carolina traditionally ranks among the best teams in the country, but do they have the horses to win at Indiana?

3. Duke vs. Kentucky (November 13)
Another one of the “youth vs. experience” battles for Kentucky, but as we’ve seen during the John Calipari era the Wildcats win them more often than not. But Duke in Atlanta should be an intriguing match-up, especially when considering Kentucky’s Kyle Wiltjer, Nerlens Noel and Alex Poythress taking on Duke’s Mason Plumlee, Ryan Kelly and Amile Jefferson.

4. Louisville at Memphis (December 15)
The old foes get together in one final non-conference battle before the Tigers join the Big East in 2013, and Josh Pastner’s got a team that is talented enough to win some NCAA tournament games. Adonis Thomas is back to full strength after missing a sizable portion of last season with a broken foot, and the arrival of Shaq Goodwin will help the Tigers inside. Louisville is deep and experienced, but the game will ultimately come down to how much point guards Joe Jackson (Memphis) and Peyton Siva (Louisville) have improved.

5. NC State at Michigan (November 27)
This is probably a bit high on the list but Michigan should be one of Indiana’s biggest challengers in the Big Ten. Guard Trey Burke and Tim Hardaway Jr. both return and John Beilein also has his best incoming freshman class since arriving in Ann Arbor. But the same can be said for the Wolfpack, who have an outstanding freshman class with three McDonald’s All-Americans joining an experienced rotation.

6. Michigan State vs. Kansas (November 13)
The other game in the Champions Classic doubleheader matches two teams that were highly successful last season but have to replace some important contributors. The Spartans have to adjust to life without Draymond Green, meaning more responsibility for veterans such as Adreian Payne, Derrick Nix and Keith Appling. Kansas moves on with Thomas Robinson and Tyshawn Taylor in the NBA, and they’ll ask for more from Elijah Johnson, Jeff Withey and Travis Releford. Both have highly-touted newcomers as well, and the questions for both teams should make for a fun battle.

7. Ohio State at Duke (November 28)
Part of the Big Ten/ACC Challenge, this game will offer a nice look into the progression of Duke point guard Quinn Cook. He’ll have the ball in his hands quite a bit this season, but Ohio State has arguably the nation’s best on-ball defender in junior Aaron Craft. The Buckeyes lose Jared Sullinger and William Buford but DeShaun Thomas returns and LaQuinton Ross should be ready to go after minimal playing time once he was ruled eligible last season.

8. UNLV at North Carolina (December 29)
UNLV won last year’s meeting in impressive fashion in Las Vegas; can they do the same in Chapel Hill? A talented cast of newcomers joins a corps of veterans led by senior guard Anthony Marshall, and Dave Rice’s team is more than capable of making serious noise in March. North Carolina has a healthy Leslie McDonald and Dexter Strickland, and James Michael McAdoo is a player many expect to break out in 2012-13.

9. San Diego State vs. UCLA (December 1 in Anaheim)
While many are focusing on the talent that’s arrived in Westwood don’t underestimate San Diego State when it comes to who the best team in southern California is. Reigning Mountain West POY Jamaal Franklin returns as do Chase Tapley, James Rahon and Xavier Thames, and newcomers such as freshman Winston Shepard will be heard from as well. UCLA will counter with their four-member freshman class and front court returnees who need to step up if they’re to contend in the Pac-12.

10. Florida at Arizona (December 15)
Despite having to go with Nick Johnson at the point the Wildcats held their own in Gainesville in last season’s meeting. With Mark Lyons on board don’t look for Sean Miller to have to make such a move in the rematch. Florida boasts an experienced front court led by Patric Young and Erik Murphy, which will be a good test for Arizona’s young but talented front court.

11. Kansas at Ohio State (December 22)
These two met in Lawrence last season (sans an injured Jared Sullinger) with the Jayhawks picking up the victory. Is Naadir Tharpe ready to take over at the point for Kansas, or will it be someone else that runs the show? Whoever that man may be, they’ll have to deal with the defense of Aaron Craft. And three players who either had to sit out all of (KU’s Ben McLemore and Jamari Traylor) or saw limited duty (OSU’s LaQuinton Ross) last season will be on display.

12. Syracuse vs. San Diego State (November 9)
This one’s actually being played on the USS Midway just outside of San Diego, so while the Aztecs are much closer to the venue this won’t be like playing in front of “The Show” from an atmosphere standpoint. How prepared is sophomore Michael Carter-Williams to take over at the point? We’re going to find out as he’ll take on SDSU’s experienced back court led by Mountain West POY Jamaal Franklin.

13. Saint Joseph’s at Creighton (December 1)
Hopefully college basketball fans don’t overlook this battle because both the Hawks and Bluejays are capable of making noise this season. The individual match-up of Creighton’s Doug McDermott and Saint Joseph’s C.J. Aiken shouldn’t disappoint (although it’s possible that Aiken will see more of Gregory Echenique than McDermott), and both teams have very good players on the perimeter as well.

14. Missouri at UCLA (December 28)
This is the Tigers’ final road game before the begin SEC play, and Frank Haith’s club is more than capable of making a splash in their new league. Point guard Phil Pressey is one of the country’s best and a rotation that adds some talented transfers (Keion Bell and Alex Oriakhi being two) should have good chemistry thanks to a summer trip to Europe. They’ll be tested by the Bruins, who have some talented newcomers of their own to rely on.

15. Michigan State at Miami (November 28)
How good can Miami be? Along with Maryland the Hurricanes have the talent needed to make a jump in the ACC standings. Shane Larkin and Durand Scott can be a handful for opposing teams, and the chance to take on Michigan State at home is something that Jim Larranaga’s program needs to take advantage of (statement game).

16. Tennessee at Georgetown (November 30)
The Volunteers’ struggles before Jarnell Stokes arrived on campus did a number on their NCAA tournament hopes last year, but having he and Jeronne Maymon together for an entire season will make them a contender in the SEC. The Hoyas on the other hand lost a lot from last year’s squad but a talented freshman class and the development of Otto Porter should net them another NCAA tournament appearance.

17. Stanford at NC State (December 18)
Two teams that hope to contend for (if not win) their respective conferences meet in Raleigh a week before Christmas. Mark Gottfried’s Wolfpack reached the Sweet 16 last season and some believe this group is capable of winning the program’s first ACC regular season title since 1989. Stanford on the other hand is looking to build on a Postseason NIT title, and the chance to see talented players such as Chasson Randle (Stanford) and C.J. Leslie (NC State) is one fans shouldn’t pass up.

18. Baylor at Gonzaga (December 28)
If there’s one thing people should give credit to Scott Drew for it’s the willingness to take on high-caliber opponents in hostile environments. Last year the Bears went to Provo where they held off BYU, and they’ll be looking to do the same against Gonzaga at “The Kennel”. Baylor has a talented rotation led by guards Pierre Jackson and Brady Heslip, and Gonzaga will counter with a deep group anchored by guard Kevin Pangos and forward Elias Harris.

19. New Mexico at Cincinnati (December 27)
While neither the Lobos nor the Bearcats are considered to be favorites in their respective conferences, both are talented enough to make a run at the Mountain West and Big East titles. Guard play should be good in this one as New Mexico brings Kendall Williams and Tony Snell to the Queen City, where Cashmere Wright and Sean Kilpatrick await.

20. Butler vs. Indiana (December 15)
Part of a doubleheader at Conseco Fieldhouse (Notre Dame/Purdue being the other tilt), a lot will be learned about the Bulldogs on the perimeter. Arkansas transfer Rotnei Clarke moves to the point, and the question is whether or not he can find the proper balance between getting guys their shots and taking a few of his own. Butler’s going to need Clarke to take on both tasks this season, and the duel between he and Jordan Hulls should be fun to watch.

21. Minnesota vs. Duke (November 22)
Trevor Mbakwe is back from the torn ACL that ended his season in 2011-12, and had the now 6th-year senior been healthy there’s a good chance that Tubby Smith’s team would have made the NCAA tournament. He and Rodney Williams lead a Golden Gopher squad that should finish in the top half of the Big Ten (at least), and this quarterfinal game against Duke in the Battle 4 Atlantis is one they can win.

22. BYU vs. Florida State (November 16)
The is one of two games in the Coaches vs. Cancer event at the Barclays Center (don’t miss Notre Dame/Saint Joseph’s either), and if BYU wants to avoid an NCAA seed similar to last year (14-seed) they can use this win on their resume. FSU may have lost Bernard James but Michael Snaer and Ian Miller return, making them a threat in the ACC.

23. North Texas at Saint Louis (December 5)
Tony Benford certainly isn’t ducking challengers in his first season in Denton, as the Mean Green begin their season at Creighton. Does Saint Louis, who is expected to contend in the Atlantic 10, have enough inside to contain All-America candidate Tony Mitchell? Can the Mean Green keep SLU’s guards, led by Kwamain Mitchell, under wraps?

24. Ohio at Massachusetts (December 19)
Ohio’s D.J. Cooper and UMass’ Chaz Williams are two of the best point guards in the country, and they’ll be on the same court in this one. Jim Christian takes over a deep team that reached the Sweet 16 last year, but Derek Kellogg can match the Bobcats man for man with his rotation. This game will have major implications for both teams as the conversations about RPI and SOS intensify later in the year.

25. Saint Mary’s vs. Drexel (November 22)
The favorite in the CAA meets the reigning WCC champion in the quarters of the Anaheim Classic and it’s worthy of being a final. But most importantly viewers should keep an eye on the match-up at point guard, with SMC’s Matthew Dellavedova taking on Drexel’s Frantz Massenat.

Five others: Colorado State at Colorado (December 5), Alabama at VCU (December 15), Wisconsin at Marquette (December 8), Florida vs. Kansas State (December 22 in Kansas City) and Marshall vs. West Virginia (December 5 in Charleston, WV).

Raphielle is also the assistant editor at CollegeHoops.net and can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

No. 11 Kentucky struggles before putting away Missouri

LEXINGTON, KY - JANUARY 21:  Bam Adebayo #3 of the Kentucky Wildcats celebrates against the South Carolina Gamecocks during the first half at Rupp Arena on January 21, 2017 in Lexington, Kentucky.  (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
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Kentucky won. That’s probably all the Wildcats need to take away from their time in Columbia, Mo.

Eleventh-ranked Kentucky defeated Missouri, 72-62, in a game that was an absolute slog for the Wildcats until the final minutes offered them some separation and reprieve from the feisty but undermanned Tigers.

Missouri led throughout much of the first half, but never held an advantage after halftime. Still, the Tigers were there lurking closely for much of the final frame, something their 7-20 record would suggest they were incapable of, even at home against Kentucky on a night where the Wildcats were about as sharp as the shape of basketball itself. Which is to say, not sharp at all.

Bam Adebayo was an absolute force on the interior for Kentucky. The freshman big had 22 points on 6 of 9 shooting from the floor and a 10 of 13 mark from the free-throw line. He also had 15 rebounds and three blocks. Missouri, like plenty of other teams before them, had no answer.

The question, though, for Kentucky this night was what kept De’Aaron Fox and Malik Monk from being productive? The pair struggled from start to finish, combining to go 8 of 22 overall and 2 of 7 from deep along with five turnovers. Making matters even worse was Isaiah Briscoe’s night. He shot it fine (4 of 6) but had six turnovers in 23 minutes.

It just wasn’t pretty for the Wildcats.

Overall, Kentucky went 5 of 18 from deep and had 17 turnovers, allowing one of the SEC’s cellar dwellers to make things interesting until the Wildcats were able to put the Tigers at arm’s length in the final few minutes.

It’s certainly not an inspiring performance from Kentucky, but against Missouri on the road, it’s not exactly surprising to seem them come with something less than their best. It can probably be excused to circumstance rather than anything more serious.

For Missouri, it was a missed opportunity to add some sort of silver lining to yet another dismal season under Kim Anderson. The third-year coach probably wouldn’t have improved his job prospects much with a win over Kentucky – things have been too bad for too long for one game to move the needle – but it still would have been nice for Missouri after so much misery, you know? But, alas, the game ended like most of them have for the Tigers in recent years, with a loss.

Now, Kentucky heads into Saturday’s matchup against No. 13 Florida with the regular-season SEC title – and some pride – on the line. The Gators whipped the Wildcats by 22 in Gainesville earlier this month, and both teams will enter Rupp Arena with matching 13-2 SEC records.

Both teams will have two games remaining after Saturday, but it would appear to mere formalities for both. Whoever wins Saturday almost certainly will win the conference outright.

Cline’s 3-pointers lift No. 14 Purdue over Penn State

WEST LAFAYETTE, IN - JANUARY 21: Isaac Haas #44, Carsen Edwards #3, Caleb Swanigan #50 and Vince Edwards #12 of the Purdue Boilermakers react in the second half of the game against the Penn State Nittany Lions at Mackey Arena on January 21, 2017 in West Lafayette, Indiana. Purdue defeated Penn State 77-52. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
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STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) Accustomed to dominating in stretches lately, the 14th-ranked Purdue Boilermakers found themselves on the other end of a big score and needed a savior against a gritty Penn State team on Tuesday night.

Enter Ryan Cline.

The guard scored six of his 11 points in overtime to lift Purdue to a 74-70 victory over the Nittany Lions in a game the Boilermakers led for just 9:16.

“It rarely happens where a team outplays another one, plays harder and they lose the game especially on their home court,” Purdue coach Matt Painter said. “Thank the Lord Cline knocked those two shots down.”

Cline’s consecutive 3-pointers secured his team’s sixth straight win and snapped the Nittany Lions’ four-game winning streak against Top 25 teams visiting the Bryce Jordan Center.

Vincent Edwards added 14 points, Isaac Haas chipped in 13 and Dakota Mathias scored 12 for the Boilermakers (23-5, 12-3 Big Ten) who trailed 33-29 at halftime.

Tony Carr scored 21 points, Lamar Stevens added 18 and Mike Watkins finished with 11 points and 12 rebounds for Penn State (14-14, 6-9). The Nittany Lions owned the paint, even against Purdue’s towering bigs — 6-foot-8 Caleb Swanigan and the 7-2 Haas — where Penn State owned a 46-12 edge.

But the Nittany Lions couldn’t get deep shots to fall. They finished just 2 for 18 from 3-point range.

“That was as hard as we’ve played all year,” Penn State coach Patrick Chambers said. “Proud of my team. However, there’s no more moral victories here. We’ve got to get some things done. We’ve got to close out games.”

Penn State led for all but 7:35 of regulation and by as many as 10 points midway through the first half. But they surrendered the lead on a dunk by Haas with 10:13 left. The Nittany Lions used a 10-2 run and four straight baskets from Carr to send the game into overtime where Cline found his shot.

BIG PICTURE

Purdue: The Boilermakers cooled off after a recent hot streak saw them dominate for large stretches of games. Purdue’s five-game winning streak entering the night included wins over Michigan State, Rutgers and Northwestern, all by at least 17 points.

Penn State: The Nittany Lions are still looking to eclipse their combined win total in January and February under Chambers. Penn State won six games for their best stretch in the two-month span a year ago and will have two more tries to surpass last year’s mark.

LOOSE GUARDS

Painter wasn’t happy with his guard play for much of the game. He sensed confusion from his backcourt and it cost them in the form of turnovers. Ten of Purdue’s 17 giveaways were committed by guards.

“Our guard play and overall ball control, there’s no question, there were times they were hesitant,” Painter said.

BIG MAN BATTLE

As Chambers spoke with reporters, he guessed Watkins was sitting in the locker room with nothing left in the tank.

“He’s exhausted in that locker room,” Chambers said. “He battled. He went toe-to-toe with a potential lottery pick and a potential first-rounder some day in Haas because I think Haas is a pro.”

Watkins was outmuscled in his first game against Purdue’s sizable forwards when he scored just six points and grabbed only three rebounds earlier this season. He had 12 rebounds in the first half — including three straight offensive midway through the first half — that brought the crowd to a roar when he finally drew a foul and made two free throws.

SHOT CLOCK ISSUE

A shot clock mishap cost the Nittany Lions a possession in overtime. With 13 seconds left and Purdue up 72-70, Haas took a jumper and missed close to the rim with the shot clock waning. It would have run out had Shep Garner not fouled P.J. Thompson immediately afterward, however.

Chambers said he thought Garner might have believed Haas’ shot hit the rim. Instead, Thompson made both free throws to put the game out of reach.

POLL IMPLICATIONS

Purdue survived a scare and its place in the poll should remain safe.

UP NEXT

Purdue plays at Michigan on Friday.

Penn State travels to Minnesota on Friday.

VIDEO: Mizzou fans chant ‘Cal you suck’ during interview, Calipari ignores question about it

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 15:  Head coach John Calipari of the Kentucky Wildcats reacts against the Michigan State Spartans in the second half during the State Farm Champions Classic at Madison Square Garden on November 15, 2016 in New York City.  (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
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This is so great and so awkward.

Let’s set the stage: No. 13 Kentucky played a pretty terrible half of basketball at Missouri, heading into halftime up just 31-30 after trailing late in the half.

Kentucky head coach John Calipari was clearly not happy about it and ripped his team in the halftime interview … while the Missouri student section chants “Cal, you suck,” which is completely audible on the broadcast. Laura Rutledge, the SEC Network sideline reporter, asks him about it, and he ghosts her.

Cal is not here for your jokes.

No. 13 Florida continues hot streak with win over South Carolina

Florida forward Devin Robinson (1) celebrates with guard KeVaughn Allen (5) as South Carolina guards PJ Dozier (15) and Hassani Gravett (2) walk up court after a play during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Gainesville, Fla. Florida won 81-66. (AP Photo/Matt Stamey)
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Things keep rolling for Florida, all the way to a nine-game winning streak and a de facto SEC regular season championship game in Lexington this weekend.

The Gators’ offense was lethally efficient and its defense stout in their 81-66 over South Carolina on Tuesday to likely end the Gamecocks’ long-shot SEC title aspirations while seriously bolstering their own chances.

Florida did its damage offensively in some of the most productive ways possible. The Gators connected from deep and converted from the free-throw line.  From distance, they were 9 of 19 (47.4 percent), and from the charity stripe, they were 22 of 27 (81.5 percent). That’s a winning formula almost every night out.

Maybe most encouraging for Florida was the return to dynamism of KeVaughn Allen. The sophomore guard had his best game in weeks, going 5 of 7 from the field – including 3 of 5 from distance – and got to the line for 14 attempts, making 13. Allen hasn’t been able to get to the free-throw line with a ton of consistency – his free-throw rate is only 23.7 – but he has shown some flashes of forcing his way there recently with 14 tonight and 10 a week ago at Auburn. If he can even approach those numbers with regularity, it’ll be a huge boon for the 87.5 percent free-throw shooter. It should be a priority for him.

The offensive outburst by Allen and the Gators at large was especially impressive coming against a South Carolina team that possesses one of the country’s stingiest defenses. The Gamecocks are typically great at making life at the 3-point arc difficult for opponents, but Florida shredded them there.

Converting from the 3-point line certainly helped cover for the absence of 6-foot-11 center John Egbunu, who suffered a season-ending knee injury last week. Devin Robinson picked up the most slack inside, blocking three shots and grabbing six rebounds, and South Carolina wasn’t really able to do much damage on the offensive glass.

With its defense taking an atypical beating, South Carolina’s offense exhibited the issues that have plagued it all season long. The Gamecocks were 3 of 14 (21.4 percent) from 3-point range, and the lack of threats along the arc shrunk their spacing and allowed Florida to harass them inside. If the offense is going to be stifled – which it probably will be more often than not with an average effective field goal percentage ranked outside the top-300 nationally – the defense has to be elite, which it was far from against Florida.

South Carolina now finds itself in a bit of a precarious, if manageable, position. The Gamecocks have lost three-straight, not something a team that is doesn’t have a 100 percent secure position in the NCAA tournament. Yes, South Carolina has a solid resume, but this is sliding in the wrong direction at the worst time. The good news is that the final three games of the regular season – vs. Tennessee, vs. Mississippi State and at Mississippi – are wholly manageable. The bad news is a stumble against any of those teams isn’t going to be looked upon with much favor by the selection committee.

The big picture for Florida is much rosier. The Gators, as noted above, are steamrolling through the final stretch of the season. They’re staking their claim to a top-three tourney seed, and will have a chance to come very close to claiming regular season SEC superiority Saturday as well.

Florida, which blasted Kentucky 88-66 earlier this month, travels to Rupp Arena to take on the No. 11 Wildcats. Both teams will be sporting 13-2 conference records (assuming Kentucky gets by/doesn’t implode at Missouri tonight) with two games left on the schedule after Saturday in which they’ll both be heavy favorites. Even if Kentucky can’t leave Columbia with a win (pause for laughter), a conference championship – whether outright or shared – will be on the line.

It might not garner the same fervor as the one played in December at the Georgia Dome, but there’s going to be a heck of an SEC title game this weekend.

No. 9 Baylor holds on 60-54 over Oklahoma to stay in 2nd

WACO, TX - JANUARY 17:  Head coach Scott Drew of the Baylor Bears in the first half at Ferrell Center on January 17, 2017 in Waco, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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WACO, Texas — Johnathan Motley had 21 points with 16 rebounds and No. 9 Baylor ended a two-game slide with a 60-54 victory over Oklahoma on Tuesday night to remain in a tie for second place in the Big 12.

Baylor almost blew all of a 15-point lead in the second half, and held on even after not making a field goal in the last 6 minutes

Oklahoma used a 21-8 run to get within 49-47 on Jamuni McNeace’s jumper with 9:21 left. But Manu Lecomte then hit consecutive 3-pointers for the Bears, though those were more than 2 minutes apart and their last field goals.

The Bears (23-5, 10-5) stayed even with No. 12 West Virginia and Iowa State in the conference standings with three games left in the regular season. Baylor’s Big 12 title hopes likely ended with a 67-65 home loss Saturday to No. 3 Kansas (24-3, 12-2).

Kansas, which is home Wednesday night against TCU, is one win from guaranteeing at least a share of its 13th consecutive Big 12 title.

Kameron McGusty had 13 points to lead the Sooners (9-18, 3-12), and was the only one of seven players who scored in their big run to make multiple baskets. His 3-pointer started the big spurt.

Lecomte finished with 11 points, while Jo Lual-Acuil Jr. had 11 points and nine rebounds for Baylor.

Oklahoma’s only lead in the first half came when Rashard Odomes converted a three-point play for a 3-2 lead only 45 seconds into the game. Motley made a tying free throw right after that before Lual-Acuil’s jumper made it 5-3.

The Sooners had scoring droughts of 5 and 3 minutes in the first half, when Lecomte, Lual-Acuil and King McClure all had 3-pointers in an 11-0 Baylor spurt that made it 22-7.

BIG PICTURE

Oklahoma: Lon Kruger will have to wait until another game for a chance to get his 600th career victory. After an NCAA Final Four appearance last season, these young Sooners, with 11 underclassmen and less than two weeks after losing senior Jordan Woodard to a torn ACL, still have some work to do to avoid the team’s first last-place finish in the Big 12.

Baylor: The Bears again made things much harder on themselves than necessary, though they did hold on to win this time. After taking a 41-26 lead early in the second half following a 3 by Motley, the Bears couldn’t build on that momentum and were in a struggle for much of the second half. Baylor was outscored 8-0 in the last 3 1/2 minutes of their home loss to Kansas on Saturday.

UP NEXT

Oklahoma: Home against Kansas State, the alma mater of Kruger, a two-time Big Eight Player of the Year for the Wildcats in 1973 and 1974.

Baylor: At Iowa State on Saturday. The Bears beat Iowa State 65-63 in their first Big 12 home game Jan. 4.