Book Report: Fly 35

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If you want a no-holds-barred, warts and all look at college basketball stardom in the early 1970s, Fly 35 is the book for you. Dave Link, a beat reporter who spent part of his career covering Austin Peay State University basketball, logged quality time with the legendary James “Fly” Williams and got the straight story of a promising basketball career gone seriously awry.

A Brooklyn native, Fly wrote his ticket out of the ghetto with a quick, athletic hoops game. First he went to a small prep school in upstate New York, where he was discovered by then-Austin Peay assistant Leonard Hamilton. Hamilton gained Fly’s services by sheer bloody-minded persistence, waiting his target out through a missed meeting and a long night of carousing. He’s one of several people in Fly’s life who tried, and failed, to curb the charismatic kid’s self-destructive instincts.

Link has the guts to allow his main character to be an anti-hero. Fly is downright unlikable quite often in the book, and we know it’s realistic, because Link went straight to the source for his background information. Fly laid his life bare for Link, fessing up to theft, drug use, infidelity and me-first blowups on and off the court. Link doesn’t spare our tender ears the real locker-room talk, either, which gives the book the real ring of authenticity that so many sanitized biographies miss out on.

There are several reasons a crazy hoop-head should read this book. It’s a true inside look into the days of giant afros, shaggy sideburns and abbreviated gym shorts, and it’s loaded with cameos from sports legends like Marvin Barnes, Adrian Dantley, Digger Phelps and even Bob Costas. There are also relatively obscure people from Fly’s life who really resonate, like Peay coach Lake Kelly, late-night crony Smuffy Ray, and rock-solid friend and teammate Howard Jackson. As much as we bat about notions like amateur purity, program discipline and early entry into the pros, nothing makes it so immediate as reading the true story of someone who lived the life, fell off the wagon several times, and nearly died in the process. No spoilers here, but I will say that Fly’s life story is like a roller coaster, and you don’t know until the last chapter whether he’s going to make it into the final stretch safely, or fly off the track at its highest point.

From what I can tell, Link self-published this book, which is loaded with vintage photos of Fly’s glory days. I bought my copy off of the website If you’re looking to increase your knowledge of hoops history before the season starts, and you want the straight story, check this book out for yourself.

Eric Angevine is the editor of Storming the Floor. He tweets @stfhoops.

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VIDEO Ron Hunter dances at Georgia State’s midnight madness

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Georgia State’s Ron Hunter appears to have recovered from the Achilles tendon tear he suffered last March celebrating the Panthers winning the Sun Belt Conference Tournament.

On Thursday night, at the third annual GSU Jam, Hunter broke out the dance moves to the song “Hit The Quan” by iHeart Memphis.

Georgia State went on to defeat No. 3 seed Baylor in the Round of 64, thanks to a game-winning three from Hunter’s son, R.J. That shot made for one of the best moments of March Madness, as Ron Hunter fell of his rolling chair in disbelief.

R.J. Hunter is nowa a rookie with the Boston Celtics. Ron Hunter enters his fifth season with the Panthers.

SMU won’t appeal tournament ban, Brown suspension

Associated Press
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Last month the NCAA announced that due to rules violations found in their investigation of the SMU men’s basketball program, the team would be banned from postseason play in 2015-16 and head coach Larry Brown would be suspended for the first nine games of the 2015-16 season. With a team led by seniors Nic Moore and Markus Kennedy and just one player (Keith Frazier) being the subject of the investigation, it was assumed that SMU would at the very least appeal the postseason ban.

Friday, the school announced that while it will appeal some of the penalties handed down by the NCAA to the men’s basketball and men’s golf programs they will not appeal the postseason ban or Brown’s suspension.

“After careful consideration, however, we will not appeal the NCAA post-season ban on men’s basketball or partial season suspension of Head Men’s Basketball Coach Larry Brown,” SMU president R. Gerald Turner stated in the release. “Although we regret the severe impact on our student-athletes, the simple fact is that the NCAA penalty structure mandates at minimum a one-year post-season ban for the level of misconduct that occurred, in our case, when a former staff member completed an online high school course for a prospective student-athlete, committing academic misconduct.

“In addition, should we appeal this matter, the lengthy process and uncertainty during this period could harm many aspects of the program. Coach Brown and his staff also agree that it is in the best interests of the program to accept these sanctions and move forward.”

Among the penalties the school will appeal (with regards to the basketball program) are the “duration of scholarship losses” and how long the recruiting restrictions placed on the program will last, and the vacating of games Frazier played in during the 2013-14 season.

This a tough turn of events for players who had nothing to do with the violations, as they see their opportunity to return to the NCAA tournament taken away. As a result of the school’s decision, SMU’s season will end March 9 following their regular season finale against Cincinnati.