Vanderbilt Mississippi Basketball

Where will Justin Coleman, Jelan Kendrick be in ’12-’13? Not on TV

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Everyone loves a success story.

There’s nothing that makes the heart feel warmer than hearing the story of an athlete that overcame insurmountable odds to turn their life into something meaningful and successful, whether it be on the court, on the field or in the classroom. It is valuable and important to highlight the fact that putting in hard work can pay off in the long run.

But it’s just as important to highlight what happens when someone gets lost on the path to success. It may not be as good of a read, but cautionary tales need to be told.

We’ve got two of them today, as Jeff Goodman of CBSSports.com dug up the destinations of two misfits from the Class of 2010.

The first is Justin Coleman. Coleman was a top 50 recruit that originally committed to Louisville but was declared academically ineligible for the 2010-2011 season. He ended up enrolling at Marshall, which is in the same West Virginia town as Huntington Prep, where Coleman spent his final year of high school. But Coleman didn’t last long there. He was suspended in late December for texting while on the bench during a loss to Belmont (seriously) and was eventually booted from the team a month later, just 19 days after being reinstated to the team.

Coleman will be spending next year at Midland Junior College in Texas.

The other name in the news is Jelan Kendrick. Kendrick was a McDonald’s All-American in 2010 and initially enrolled at Memphis. But after a series of issues during his limited time with the Tigers, Kendrick was eventually kicked off the team before ever suiting up for a game. He wound up enrolling at Ole Miss in December of that year, becoming eligible to play for the Rebels at the semester break last season. Things were going OK when Kendrick decided to leave the arena during warmups for a game against Alabama. He eventually returned midway through the first half, but never left the bench — not for timeouts, for second half warmups, for anything.

As you might imagine, Kendrick and Ole Miss parted ways. He’ll be spending next season at Indian Hills JuCo in Iowa.

Kendrick was a McDonald’s All-American, a top 20 recruit nationally that had the talent to one day play in the NBA. Coleman wasn’t quite as highly-regarded coming out of high school, but he was a top 50 recruit. It stands to reason that, given the question marks they had in high school, the recruitniks that put out those rankings had Kendrick and Coleman slotted lower than where their talent level should have gotten them.

Junior College basketball is a long way from Marshall and Ole Miss, let alone Memphis and Louisville.

Remember this. Success is never guaranteed.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

POSTERIZED: Cal’s Jaylen Brown has his dunk contest entry

California's Jaylen Brown lays up a shot against Oregon State in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016, in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
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Cal picked up a big win over Oregon State in Haas Pavilion on Saturday night, and the exclamation point was this emphatic dunk from Jaylen Brown:

Niang, Morris lead No. 14 Iowa State past No. 24 Texas

Iowa State forward Georges Niang drives past Texas guard Tevin Mack, left, during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016, in Ames, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall
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After falling at Texas Tech for the second straight season midweek, No. 14 Iowa State needed to bounce back with No. 24 Texas visiting Hilton Coliseum. The return of Jameel McKay, who was suspended for two games, certainly helped the Cyclones and the play of Georges Niang and Monte Morris was key as well. But the biggest difference on this night was the fact that Iowa State was able to limit the effectiveness of Texas point guard Isaiah Taylor.

 

Taylor scored just nine points on 3-for-14 shooting from the field, and with Morris and Niang scoring 24 points apiece the Cyclones won by the final score of 85-75.

Taylor had multiple opportunities to make plays around the basket thanks to his ability to beat defenders off the bounce, but he struggled to finish. Add in a 0-for-4 night from three, and Texas’ most dangerous offensive option was unable to duplicate his performance in the first meeting between the two teams. In Texas’ 94-91 overtime win over the Cyclones January 12, Taylor scored 28 points and dished out six assists with just one turnover, shooting 11-for-17 from the field.

Four Longhorns finished in double figures, with Tevin Mack and Javan Felix scoring 18 apiece, but with Morris decisively winning the point guard matchup Texas was unable to pick up the win on the road.

For Iowa State the aforementioned tandem of Morris and Niang performed as they did in the first meeting, which should come as no surprise. What helped them, especially when it came to Texas attacking the basket, was the presence of McKay. McKay finished the game with eight points, seven rebounds and four blocks in 22 minutes of action, and to have their best interior defender back on the floor certainly helped the Cyclones on this night.

With their lack of depth Iowa State’s margin for error is small, especially when it comes to foul trouble, injuries and disciplinary reasons. Even with Texas’ size advantage Iowa State outscored them in the paint 48-34, and McKay’s defensive ability factored into that. The Cyclones can put points on the board with the best of them, but at some point they’ll need to string together stops as the games get even bigger.

Iowa State managed to do that down the stretch, with Morris and Niang running the show offensively. And that’s a good formula to be able to rely upon as the season approaches its most important month.