Nike Global Challenge Recap: James Young earns MVP

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Michigan native James Young was terrific during Nike’s EYBL season.

A 6-foot-6 left-hander, Young proved himself an athletic slasher that could really shoot the ball from beyond the arc. But through three games at Nike’s Global Challenge, Young had struggled for the USA’s Midwest team. He was averaging 15.0 points, but shooting just 42% from the floor and 2-17 from three while committing 13 turnovers. The Midwest went 3-0 in pool play, but it wasn’t the result of a sterling performance from Young.

That changed in the title game, however.

Young finished with 29 points — including a flurry that saw him score 16 points in a six-minute stretch in the fourth quarter — on 12-23 shooting (5-10 from three) to lead the Midwest to a 100-86 win over Andrew Wiggins and Team Canada.

For observers (ahem, like me) that were questioning how a gunner that couldn’t shoot was so highly-regarded, Young did a fine job providing an answer. Everyone is allowed a couple off-nights in a row, and a glimpse of the kind of show that he can put on when he gets it going was enough to earn American MVP honors.

Some other top performers:

Troy Williams (19.8 ppg, 4.3 rpg, 5-13 3PT’s): Williams had a tough spring, but he showed off why every coach in the country wanted him back in March. He’s an incredible athlete, and standing 6-foot-6 with impressive lengths, he’s always been a highlight waiting to happen. The 38.5% shooting from beyond the arc was nice, though.

Wes Clark (11.3 ppg, 4.3 rpg, 3.7 apg): Young’s AAU teammate, Clark is currently one of the most underrated point guard prospects. He isn’t nationally ranked (which will change very soon), but with his athleticism, quickness, ability to penetrate and finish at the rim, and range on his jump shot, Clark should have a much higher-profile come August.

Nigel Williams-Goss (17.3 ppg, 4.3 rpg, 3.5 apg): Washington got a good one in Williams-Goss. He’s a solid facilitator that is one of the few kids that communicates well on the court. He didn’t shoot all that well, but he was able to penetrate. Had 24 points in his first game and went for 18 points, six assists, five boards and no turnovers in a dominating win over Brazil in the third-place game.

Andrew Wiggins (19.7 ppg, 7.0 rpg): Wiggins was clearly the best prospect at the event, but he didn’t play his best at this tournament. That’s what happens when defenses face-guard you.

Trey Lyles (21.0 ppg, 9.0 rpg): Lyles put on one of the most impressive performances, with 27 points and 11 boards in a win over USA East. The focus on Wiggins allowed Lyles to have space to shine.

Theo Pinson (15.0 ppg, 7.3 rpg): Pinson showed off a well-rounded game. He hit some threes, he threw down a couple of dunks, he made plays defensively, he penetrated and dished. What I liked the most was that Pinson made some big plays in the final minutes.

Nick King (18.3 ppg, 8.8 rpg): King is a Memphis native and another lefty that consistently was able to score around the paint. A 6-foot-7 slasher, King also showed off the ability to step out and knock down a three.

Bobby Portis (12.8 ppg, 9.5 rpg): Portis didn’t do much damage with his back to the basket, but he was active on the glass and ran the floor well.

Marcus Lee (12.5 ppg, 8.8 rpg, 3.0 bpg): Lee was very impressive. He showed off a soft touch around the basket, impressive athleticism and an ability to dominate around the rim. He blocked seven shots in one game.


Gao Shang (27.3 ppg, 42.5% 3PT’s): China was never competitive, but Shang was a guy that caught the eye of a lot of NBA scouts. He gave Troy Williams 26 points in a half and went for 35 twice.

Janus Tamulis (18.5 ppg): Tamulis was a good defender that was a streaky shooter. Scouts liked him, and the rumor was that he was considering coming to the States to play in college.

– Deryk Evandro Ramos (16.3 ppg, 3.5 apg, 50% 3PT’s): Ramos was a tough point guard that didn’t turn the ball over, defended well and proved a competent playmaker. One high major head coach said he thought Ramos could be the best point guard in the event as he watched him give Cat Barber 16 points and nine assists in Brazil’s win over USA East.

Derek Reese (20.0 ppg, 11.3 rpg): The Puerto Rican Tennessee-commit was one of the most productive players at the event.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

Florida Gulf Coast’s Demetris Morant out 3-4 months

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Florida Gulf Coast redshirt junior forward Demetris Morant is expected to miss the next 3-4 months after undergoing surgery last week to repair a stress fracture in his right shin, the school announced on Tuesday.

The 6-foot-9 forward averaged 4.5 points, 4.4 blocks and 1.3 blocks per game in 33 appearances (18 starts) for the Eagles during the 2014-15 season.

“This is obviously an unfortunate setback for Demetris, but it was a procedure that needed to be done,” Florida Gulf Coast head coach Dooley said in a statement. “We decided it would be best to have it completed now to hopefully get him back for A-Sun play. It’s an opportunity now for other guys to step up in his absence, and I have confidence they’ll get the job done.”

The Eagles have the top frontline in the Atlantic Sun, one that returns Marc-Eddy Norelia and Filip Cvjeticanin, a 3-point shooter who missed all of last season recovering from back surgery. VCU transfer Antravious Simmons becomes eligible in the second semester.

Florida Gulf Coast begins the 2015-16 season on Nov. 14 against Ohio.

Bill Self on Cheick Diallo: ‘It may be a couple of more weeks’

2015 McDonald's All American Game
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Cheick Diallo is currently practicing with Kansas, but his eligibility still remains in question.

On Monday, Kansas head coach Bill Self appeared on “The Border Patrol” on WHB-AM 810 and was asked to update the status of his freshman big man.

“He’s been cleared to practice,” Self told hosts Steven St. John and Nate Bukaty. “(His status) is depending on what they find throughout from the information we submit to them whenever we get it all together.

“A lot of people think, ‘Well, why wouldn’t it all be together?’ Well there’s a lot of reasons why. It’s because they told us recently some things that they just wanted. Instead of just throwing it to them piece by piece, they requested we to just submit it all together, so it may be a couple of more weeks before we’re able to submit everything when you’re talking about getting information from schools in Mali and everything like that.

“But we hope in two weeks, maybe three weeks, before we have a definite answer. But right now, Cheick is like everybody else. He’s practicing.”

Diallo, a 6-foot-9 forward from Mali is allowed to practice with the Jayhawks, but has been waiting to be cleared by the NCAA Eligibility Center despite enrolling in classes over the summer and earning six credits. Self anticipated this would be a long process, but has remained confident Diallo, the top-5 recruit in Class of 2015, will eventually be cleared to play this season.

For three years, Diallo attended Our Savior New American School in Centereach, New York, which is currently under NCAA review. In September, Pitt freshman Damon Wilson, Diallo’s teammate at OSNA, was cleared to play.

Kansas opens the season on Nov. 13 against Northern Colorado.