NBA draft breakdown: The top 10 shooting guards

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All this week at CBT, we’ll be spotlighting the top players at each position for the 2012 NBA draft. Monday featured the top point guards. Today? The shooting guards.

1. Bradley Beal, Fr., Florida: Beal’s always been a star, but he showcased more than his shooting skills with the Gators. An overabundance of scorers often forced Florida coach Billy Donovan to play Beal on the wing or even at power forward at times and he responded by leading them in rebounding (6.5 rpg) and was second in scoring (14.8 ppg). The only surprise was his perimeter shooting. Beal’s often compared to Ray Allen for his poise and pure shooting stroke, but Allen never shot worse than 40 percent beyond the arc in college. Beal made just 34 percent of his 186 attempts, a number that must improve. Still, if there’s a can’t miss guard in the draft, it’s Beal. He plays smart, plays hard and is a true talent.

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2. Jeremy Lamb, So. Connecticut: Lamb looks like an NBA star. Long, lean with surprising quickness and a solid shot, he could step in as a team’s second or third option right away – if he feels like it. Passivity has always been Lamb’s biggest issue. That he rarely forces shots is both his biggest strength and weakness. Could he be a star? Absolutely. But he’d have to want to be a star. On a team that likes using pick and rolls, he’ll average 15 or more as a rookie.

3. Austin Rivers, Fr., Duke: Unlike Lamb, there’s no question Rivers wants to be a star. His lightning-quick crossover is perfect for the NBA, he boasts the range and the knack for hitting game-winners. But is Rivers’ too aggressive and too willing to go one-on-one with defenders? He’ll quickly adjust to the NBA’s speed and physical style and there’ll be night when he shines. Question is, what happens on the nights when he can’t connect? Can he contribute in other ways?

4. Dion Waiters, So., Syracuse: The 6-4 specimen reportedly has a promise that’ll he be a lottery pick, which means someone will add a player who can overpower most shooting guards. Waiters is strong, excels at getting into the lane and creating his own shot. His college production (12.6 ppg) doesn’t do his skills justice, mostly because he was willing to be part of the Orange’s system. The only problem? Waiters is a bit short and he doesn’t boast a strong perimeter game.

5. Terrence Ross, So., Washington: The 6-7 Ross also would thrive on the wing, but his frame is probably better suited to an NBA team’s backcourt. When Ross’ jumper is falling (45.7 percent and 51.8 percent on twos), he’s deadly. He’ll slash in the lane, pull up for a jumper or attack the rim. His confidence and game developed rapidly in just two years at Washington. What’s the limit once he hits the pros?

6. John Jenkins, Jr., Vanderbilt: Need a guy to stretch the defense? Jenkins is your man. He’s a little slow and not overly athletic, which might limit his role in the NBA, but his shot can’t be questioned. With a little more work on his ball-handling, Jenkins could have a long, productive career.

7. Orlando Johnson, Sr. Santa Barbara: Johnson was a prolific scorer the last three years and delivered when it mattered for the Gauchos, leading them to two NCAA tournament appearances. But he’s a volume scorer who has average size and athleticism.

8. Doron Lamb, So. Kentucky: Consider Lamb at this spot a bargain. He’s Jenkins, but with a better shooting stroke. If he lasts into the second round and Cleveland gets him, that’s instant offense off the bench. A smart contender – like Chicago or Miami – would be even smarter to nab him at the end of the first round.

9. Jared Cunningham, Jr. Oregon State: No guard prospect boasts more athleticism than Cunningham. He’s not overly skilled, but would be an immediate boosts as a defensive player and spark off the bench. His shot and ball-handling need work, but this might be the player with the most upside in this group.

10. Will Barton, So., Memphis: Barton’s game might be better suited for the wing given that his perimeter stroke is inconsistent. But he’s got the quickness to play the 2 and can get to the rim when he wants.

You also can follow me on Twitter @MikeMillerNBC.

VIDEO: Jay-Z’s nephew posterizes nation’s No. 1 recruit Marvin Bagley III

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Nahziah Carter is an unsigned 6-foot-6 wing in the Class of 2017.

He’s also Jay-Z’s nephew, and he just so happened to posterize Marvin Bagley III — the clearcut No. 1 prospect in the Class of 2018 — while Hova was in the stands watching him.

NCAA denies extra-year request by NC State guard Henderson

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NCAA has denied North Carolina State guard Terry Henderson’s request for another year of eligibility.

Henderson announced the decision Friday in a statement issued by the school.

The Raleigh native played two seasons at West Virginia before transferring to N.C. State and redshirting in 2014-15. He played for only 7 minutes of the following season before suffering a season-ending ankle injury.

As a redshirt senior in 2016-17, he was the team’s second-leading scorer at 13.8 points per game and made a team-best 78 3-pointers.

Henderson called it “an honor and privilege” to play in his hometown.

SMU gets transfer in Georgetown’s Akoy Agau

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SMU pulled in a frontcourt player in Georgetown transfer Akoy Agau, a source confirmed to NBCSports.com. Agau is immediately eligible for next season as a graduate transfer.

The 6-foot-8 Agau started his career at Louisville before transferring to Georgetown after one season. Spending two seasons with the Hoyas, Agau was limited to 11 minutes in his first season due to injuries. He averaged 4.5 points and 4.3 rebounds per game last season.

Coming out of high school, Agau was a four-star prospect but he’s never lived up to that billing in-part because of injuries. Now, Agau gets one more chance to make a difference as he’s hoping to help replace some departed pieces like Ben Moore and Semi Ojeleye.

South Carolina loses big man Sedee Keita to transfer

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South Carolina big man Sedee Keita will transfer from the program, he announced on Friday.

The 6-foot-9 Keita was once regarded as a top-100 national prospect in the Class of 2016, but he never found consistent minutes with the Gamecocks for last season’s Final Four team.

Keita appeared in 29 games and averaged 1.1 points and 2.0 rebounds per game while shooting 27 percent from the field.

A native of Philadelphia, Keita will have to sit out next season before getting three more seasons of eligibility.

Although Keita failed to make an impact during his only season at South Carolina, he’ll be a coveted transfer thanks to his size and upside.

Mississippi State losing two to transfer

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Mississippi State will lose two players to transfer as freshmen Mario Kegler and Eli Wright are leaving the program.

Both Kegler and Wright were four-star prospects coming out of high school as they were apart of a six-man recruiting class that is supposed to be a major foundation for Ben Howland’s future with the Bulldogs.

The 6-foot-7 Kegler was Mississippi State’s third-leading scorer last season as he averaged 9.7 points and 5.5 rebounds per game. Kegler should command some quality schools on the transfer market, especially since he’ll still have three more years of eligibility after sitting out next season due to NCAA transfer regulations. Kegler’s loss is also notable for Mississippi State because it is the second consecutive offseason that Howland lost a top-100, in-state product to transfer after only one season after Malik Newman left for Kansas.

Wright, a 6-foot-4 guard, was never able to find consistent minutes as he was already behind underclass perimeter options like Quinndary Weatherspoon, Lamar Peters and Tyson Carter last season. With Nick Weatherspoon, Quinndary’s four-star brother, also joining the Bulldogs next season, the writing was likely on the wall that Wright wasn’t going to earn significant playing time.