Eastern Washington Weber St Basketball

NBA draft breakdown: The top 10 point guards

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All this week at CBT, we’ll be spotlighting the top players at each position for the 2012 NBA draft. To start? The point guards.

1. Damian Lillard, Jr, Weber State: Lillard is the best point guard prospect in a weak year for point guards. While he has good size, terrific athleticism and the ability to score in bunches (he’s an excellent, efficient shooter), the question that surrounds him is his ability to run a team. Is he truly a point guard or a scorer that handles the ball?

2. Kendall Marshall, So, North Carolina: There is no questioning Marshall’s ability to pass the ball. I don’t think it would be possible for me to overstate how well he sees the floor or his willingness to pass. But is he quick enough to defend NBA point guards? Can he be a consistent three-point shooter from the NBA’s line?

3. Marquis Teague, Fr, Kentucky: Teague had a bit of an up and down season. As is the case with most of Calipari’s freshman point guards, Teague struggled to acclimate to his role early in the year, but ended up becoming a very effective player down the stretch of the season. His jump shot needs work, but he proved himself to be capable of facilitating an offense during the NCAA tournament.

4. Tony Wroten, Fr, Washington: Wroten is the most interesting prospect at this position to me. He’s got loads of talent and potential: he’s 6-foot-4, he’s a terrific scorer, he can score in bunches and he can make highlight reel passes. But he’s a mediocre shooter that has questionable shot selection and decision-making.

5. Tyshawn Taylor, Sr, Kansas: Taylor, like Wroten, is an enigma. He’s an extremely talented player, as evidenced by the two month-long stretch during Big 12 play that he was the best point guard in the country. But he’s has a tendency to turn the ball over and is prone to bouts of inconsistency.

6. Scott Machado, Sr, Iona: Machado thrived in Iona’s uptempo system, as he is excellent leading the break and has terrific court vision. His jumpshot improved this season and he got into better shape during the offseason, increasing his athleticism and explosiveness, but there are still questions as to whether those two aspects of his game are NBA caliber.

7. Casper Ware, Sr, Long Beach State: Ware can flat out score. We all got a glimpse of it this past season when he went for 28 points in a win at Pitt. The LBSU point guard also made a name for himself by earning MVP honors in LA’s famed Drew League. But he’s only 5-foot-9.

8. Tu Holloway, Sr, Xavier: Holloway has proven himself to be a tough scorer with a knack for making shots in crunch-time. He’s also a terrific defender. But what does he do at an NBA level?

9. Tomas Satoansky, Czech Republic: Satoansky is a 6-foot-7 guard that can play both positions. He can create off the dribble, but his struggles defensively and his lacking jump shot are major question marks. Draft Express says it is “difficult to point out any one part of his game that will translate seamlessly to the NBA.”

10. Jordan Taylor, Sr, Wisconsin: Taylor is an elite floor general that really understands how to run a team and excels in pick-and-roll situations. He lacks elite athleticism, however, and struggles not only to beat his man off the dribble, but to finish around the rim. But with his ability to shoot and avoid turnovers (particularly what he did as a junior) makes him a viable prospect.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

VIDEO: Monmouth hits a game-winner, Bench Mob member tries to disrobe

King Rice
AP
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Monmouth used a 17-2 run in the final minutes to beat Rider on Friday night, a win that will keep the Hawks within striking distance of the kind of an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament should they fall in the MAAC tourney.

The run was capped by star point guard Justin Robinson, who buried this three with three seconds left to put Monmouth up for good, 79-78:

No. 17 Arizona erases double-digit deficit to beat UCLA

Arizona coach Sean Miller reacts to a foul call during the first half of Arizona's NCAA college basketball game against UCLA, Friday, Feb 12, 2016, in Tucson, Ariz. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)
(AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)
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Allonzo Trier scored 15 of his 18 points in the second half and Parker Jackson-Cartwright scored 16 points in his second career start as No. 17 Arizona knocked off UCLA, 81-75, in Tucson on Friday night.

UCLA was up by as much as 11 points in the first half and took a ten point lead into half time, but in the second half, the Bruins were eventually done in by foul trouble and the stronger front line of the Wildcats.

Ryan Anderson and Kaleb Tarczewski were dominant down the stretch. The duo combined to score 12 of the last 23 point for the Wildcats, including the bucket that put the Wildcats ahead for the first time since early in the first half. Off of a missed free throw, UCLA’s Thomas Welsh battled with Tarczewski for the rebound, but when Welsh finally seemed to gain control of the loose ball, Anderson knocked it out of his hands and bullied through Jonah Bolden for a layup.

All told, those two combined for 20 points and 27 boards, seven of which were offensive. They also managed to foul out both Welsh and Tony Parker, although some of the calls that went against UCLA down the stretch were questionable.

The win keeps Arizona within a game of first place Oregon in the Pac-12 standings and tied for second with No. 23 USC, who will be visiting the McKale Center on Sunday night.