Shabazz Muhammad, Nerlens Noel highlight Parade All-Americans

Leave a comment

Parade Magazine released its 2012 All-America Team on Sunday, and many familiar faces are on the list with the top two players in the class of 2012 leading the way.

Kentucky signee Nerlens Noel and UCLA signee Shabazz Muhammad are both on the list, as are forward Kyle Anderson (UCLA) , guard Gary Harris (Michigan State) and center Kaleb Tarczewski (Arizona).

In all the list has forty players, with Arizona, Kentucky and UCLA leading the way with three commits each.

By conference, the Pac-12 led the way with nine players making the list with the Big Ten following with six. The Ivy League even had a future player make the team (guard Tony Hicks), as did the Atlantic Sun (forward John Ross Glover).

Just two players on the team have yet to commit: Davonta Pollard and Savon Goodman. According to multiple outlets Goodman, who hails from Philadelphia, took an official visit to SMU over the weekend.

Adolphus Washington Taft Cincinnati, Ohio 6’5″ F Ohio State
Alex Poythress Northeast Clarksville, Tenn. 6’8″ F Kentucky
Archie Goodwin Sylvan Hills High Sherwood, Ark. 6’4″ G Kentucky
Brandon Ashley Findlay Prep Henderson, Nev. 6’8″ F Arizona
Brice Johnson Edisto Cordova, S.C. 6’9″ F North Carolina
Bruce Marshall Fayette Fayette, Mo. 6’10” C Missouri State
Cameron Biedscheid Cardinal Ritter St. Louis, Mo. 6’8″ F Notre Dame
Deandre Burnett Carol City Miami Gardens, Fla. 6’1″ G Miami
Devonta Pollard Kemper County High De Kalb, Miss. 6’7″ F undecided
Dewayne Russell Peoria Peoria, Ariz. 5’10” G USC
Gary Harris Hamilton Southeastern Fishers, Ind. 6’4″ G Michigan State
Grant Jerrett Lutheran La Verne, Calif. 6’10” F Arizona
Isaiah Cousins Mount Vernon Mount Vernon, N.Y. 6’4″ G Oklahoma
Javion Watson San Ysidro San Diego, Calif. 6’2″ G Long Beach State
Joe McDonald Landon School Bethesda, Md. 6’1″ G George Wash.
John Ross Glover Univ. School of Jackson Jackson, Tenn. 6’4″ F Lipscomb
John Simons Cadillac Cadillac, Mich. 6’8″ F Central Michigan
Jordan Loveridge West Jordan West Jordan, Utah 6’6″ F Utah
Josh Scott Lewis-Palmer Monument, Colo. 6’9″ C Colorado
Kaleb Tarczewski St. Mark’s Southborough, Mass. 7’0″ C Arizona
Kenneth Gaines Whitefield Academy Mableton, Ga. 6’4″ G Georgia
Kris Dunn New London New London, Conn. 6’4″ G Providence
Kyle Anderson St. Anthony Jersey City, N.J. 6’8″ F UCLA
Marcus Paige Linn-Mar High Marion, Iowa 6’2″ G North Carolina
Matt Costello Bay City Western Auburn, Mich. 6’10” F Michigan State
Maurice Watson Boys Latin Charter School Philadelphia, Penn. 5’10” G Boston U.
Mike Gesell South Sioux City South Sioux City, Neb. 6’2″ G Iowa
Mitch McGary Brewster Academy Wolfeboro, N.H. 6’10” F Michigan
Nerlens Noel Tilton School Tilton, N.H. 6’10” C Kentucky
Omar Calhoun Christ the King High Middle Village, N.Y. 6’4″ G UConn
Perry Ellis Heights Wichita, Kan. 6’8″ F Kansas
Rasheed Sulaimon Strake Jesuit Houston, Texas 6’4″ G Duke
Rodney Purvis Upper Room Christian Raleigh, N.C. 6’4″ G N.C. State
Sam Dekker Sheboygan Area Lutheran Sheboygan, Wis. 6’8″ F Wisconsin
Savon Goodman Constitution Philadelphia, Penn. 6’6″ F undecided
Shabazz Muhammad Bishop Gorman Las Vegas, Nev. 6’6″ G UCLA
Stefan Moody Poinciana Kissimmee, Fla. 5’10” G Florida Atlantic
Tony Hicks St. Rita Chicago, Ill. 6’2″ G Pennsylvania
Tony Parker Miller Grove Lithonia, Ga. 6’9″ C UCLA
Twymond Howard Pearl High Pearl, Miss. 6’6″ F UTEP

Raphielle is also the assistant editor at CollegeHoops.net and can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

Report: Chris Collins to receive lengthy contract extension

Leave a comment

Chris Collins and Northwestern have reportedly agreed to a lengthy contract extension on Monday morning.

According to Teddy Greenstein of the Chicago Tribune, Collins, 43, and the university have come to terms on a deal that will run through the 2024-25 season.

The news shouldn’t come as a surprise. Collins, in his fourth year in Evanston, took Northwestern to the first NCAA Tournament in school history. The Wildcats defeated Vanderbilt in the first round and had eventual national finalist Gonzaga on the ropes in the second round before a controversial call swung all the momentum they had.

In four seasons, Collins has a 73-60 (30-42 Big Ten) record, with back-to-back 20-win seasons.

Northwestern football coach Pat Fitzgerald is also reportedly in line for an extension, according to the Tribune.

Sacred Heart’s Quincy McKnight to transfer

Leave a comment

Quincy McKnight, a first-team all-Northeast Conference selection this past season, will transfer from Sacred Heart.

He announced his news via his Instagram page on Monday afternoon, according to Kels Dayton of WTDH, an ABC news affiliate located in New Haven, Connecticut.

McKnight, a 6-foot-3 guard, averaged 18.9 points, 4.9 rebounds and 3.0 assists per game as a sophomore for the Pioneers. He will have to sit out the upcoming season due to NCAA transfer rules but will have two years of eligibility remaining.

This is an all-too-familiar feeling for Sacred Heart head coach Anthony Latina. One year ago, Cane Broome, the NEC Player of the Year, informed him of his desire to transfer. This fall, he expects to make an immediate impact on Cincinnati, a program to reach its eighth consecutive NCAA Tournament.

It’s a tough pill to swallow for any mid-major coach, especially for it to occur for the second season in the row. But you can’t blame McKnight — a two-star recruit coming out of prep school — for wanting a chance to play at the highest level possible, just as you can’t blame low and mid-major coaches from accepting better jobs at bigger schools. This isn’t an isolated situation either. With the rise of graduate transfers in recent years and the extended NBA Draft deadline, many programs currently face uncertainty at this point in time.

As we enter the second live recruiting period of April, Latina and his staff can sell recruits on their ability to identify and develop talent by using Broome and McKnight as examples. That recruiting strategy might best be described as cutting your nose off to spite your face but given the current landscape for mid-major programs, isn’t that pitch a silver-lining in what can otherwise be considered another frustrating spring?

Five Takeaways from the adidas Gauntlet Dallas

Leave a comment

FORT WORTH, Tx. — The April Live Evaluation period had its first of two weekends as events took place all over the country. Many of the nation’s top college coaches were stationed at shoe-company events held by adidas, Nike and Under Armour.

I spent the weekend watching a lot of the top Class of 2018, 2019 and even some 2020 prospects at the adidas Gauntlet in Fort Worth.

Here are some takeaways from the event, including some thoughts on Zion Williamson, Romeo Langford and more.

1. Zion Williamson draws a huge crowd but still has some work on his game

Although he only played a game and a half due to a lingering knee injury that ended his weekend early, the national hype machine for YouTube sensation and Class of 2018 star Zion Williamson is very real. Not many players draw large crowds of outsiders during grassroots events but players from other events and local fans turned out en masse to try and see some of the highlights that Williamson has put together these past few months.

He wasn’t quite 100 percent because of the knee, but the South Carolina native still showed the type of rare burst off the floor that allows the 6-foot-6 Williamson to snare rebounds and score over bigger players. People who hadn’t seen Williamson live before were also stunned at how big and strong he actually appears in person compared to the average high school basketball prospect.

Even though Williamson still has to polish his overall skill level and jumper, there are just times that he looks like a man among boys out on the floor.

Williamson will likely be a destructive force at the college level because of his ability to operate around the rim and in transition but he’s also going to have to make sure he tries to develop some range to keep defenders honest. Still shooting a pretty hard ball on jumpers, Williamson has to work on 3-pointers and free throws during these next few months.

2. Romeo Langford is still working on consistency

Consensus top-five Class of 2018 prospect Romeo Langford is an elite shooting guard prospect thanks to his overall package of athleticism and skills and he’s mostly focused on making sure that he brings his best effort every game.

In the past, Langford was the type of player who could go for 40 in one game and then play sluggish in the next as he needed to make sure that he was dialed in during each contest. Although he led the adidas Gauntlet in scoring playing in three games this weekend, it came with more of the same results as we’ve seen in the past.

In two games, scoring came easy for Langford as he was able to do a lot of damage off of isolations while drawing a lot of fouls. Langford shot 24-for-27 over three games at the free-throw line so that type of scoring ability should translate well at all levels.

When Langford starts to get double-teamed and teams play against him in a physical manner, that is when things start to get difficult for him. Langford can get frustrated with contact at times and he’s also prone to some lapses in intensity.

It’s also fair to say that Langford is very talented and that he’ll also adjust as he adds more strength over time. In a class that doesn’t have many top-flight guards, Langford stands out from the rest because his ceiling is just higher.

3. Immanuel Quickley’s improved perimeter shooting puts him in top 2018 lead guard conversation

One of the biggest revelations from an individual player standpoint came from Baltimore native and lead guard Immanuel Quickley. Already considered a five-star prospect in the Class of 2018, the big knock on the 6-foot-4 Quickley was his lack of a perimeter jumper.

While Quickley’s great size and feel for the game enabled him to dominate at times when he could get in the paint and make plays, opposing defenses found they could sag on him and force him to shoot perimeter jumpers because he was inconsistent.

Quickley appears to have shored up his big weakness. Shooting 48 percent from three-point range (14-for-29) this weekend, Quickley really shoot the ball well as he had confidence off the catch and off the dribble. Since Quickley is already a pick-and-roll maestro who can thread tight passes to teammates, this ability to hit deep jumpers opens up so much more to his game.

Quickley isn’t an elite above-the-rim athlete but he has a ton of things to really like about his game and he’s going to be in the mix among the top lead guards in the Class of 2018. Quickley is down to a final seven of Duke, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Miami, Providence and Virginia.

This was the type of weekend that should give Quickley a lot of confidence going forward. Quickley got the better of five-star guards Quentin Grimes and Romeo Langford in back-to-back matchups (going head-to-head with those players on some possessions) so he’s been ready to take on all challengers so far this spring.

It should also be noted that Quickley’s teammates, Class of 2018 guard Montez Mathis, also had an outstanding weekend scoring the ball as he has immediately vaulted himself into a larger high-major discussion.

4. College coaches are still starving for perimeter shooters

As the 3-point revolution continues to sweep across many levels of basketball, college coaches are looking for any kind of shooters out on the circuit this spring. The adidas Gauntlet didn’t yield as many perimeter options as some college coaches would have liked.

As Hoop Seen’s Justin Young pointed out, only a handful of players at adidas made 10 or more three-pointers this weekend and most players played in three or four games.

It’ll be interesting to see if any more shooters emerge the second weekend of the April period because there doesn’t seem to be a lot of floor spacing out there right now.

5. Keep an eye on late 2017 signees like McKinley Wright

One of the interesting things about the April period being back is that it gives unsigned Class of 2017 players a chance to compete in front of college coaches. College coaches started to call Minnesota native McKinley Wright when he decommitted from Dayton after Archie Miller took the Indiana job.

So Wright now gets to play high-level competition in front of a number of college coaches who need an available point guard to come in and potentially play next season.

Since opening things up from Dayton and decommitting, Baylor, Butler, Clemson, Colorado, Illinois, Kansas State, Minnesota, Santa Clara and Utah are the primary schools involved. Wright still has three official visits left as he’s o

“I’ve been talking to a couple of schools about maybe setting up a visit but I haven’t really scheduled one yet. But I’m planning on using at least two.”

Wright is hoping to find a situation where he can play right away. He looked good at adidas, but you also have to keep in mind that he’s one class older than most of his competition. Still, with a lot of colleges looking for anyone who can handle the ball and potentially knock down shots, Wright is an intriguing spring recruit that could be a rotation player next season.

Zylan Cheatham transfers to Arizona State

Leave a comment

Zylan Cheatham will continue his college collegiate in his home state.

According to Jeff Goodman, the San Diego State transfer will enroll at Arizona State. He will sit out next season and have two years of eligibility remaining.

“It had a little bit to do with going back home,” Cheatham told Goodman. “But it was more about the basketball situation and that Coach [Bobby] Hurley and I had the same vision for me and for the program.”

The 6-foot-9 forward averaged 9.1 points and 6.3 rebounds per game last season for the Aztecs.

 

Jevon Carter enters NBA Draft, won’t hire agent

Leave a comment

West Virginia guard Jevon Carter has submitted his name as an early entry into the 2017 NBA Draft. He will not hire an agent, leaving him the option to return to Morgantown for his senior season.

“Jevon will go through the process in a systematic and professional manner by exploring the situation and leaving open his option to come back for his senior season,” West Virginia head coach Bob Huggins said in a statement issued by the university on Monday afternoon.

Carter, one of the nation’s elite defenders, averaged 13.0 points, 5.0 rebounds, 3.7 assists and 2.5 steals per game for the Mountaineers this past season.

If this decision is simply exploratory, like many assume it is, Carter has until May 24 to withdraw his name from the draft.

With the 6-foot-2 Carter back in the lineup, West Virginia is projected to be a top-15 team entering the 2017-18 season, according to NBC Sports.