Yancy Gates, Tu Holloway

So is the Crosstown Shooutout actually moving to a neutral court?

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On Tuesday morning, Bill Koch of the Cincinnati Enquirer broke the news that the Crosstown Shootout — one of the few nationally relevant rivalries left after the latest round of realignment — will, in fact, be played next season.

The Crosstown Shootout, for those that don’t know, pits Xavier and Cincinnati, two schools with campuses just a couple of miles apart. It also was the setting for last season’s ugliest moment, as an always-intense game reached the tipping point, as a brawl broke out that resulted in a bloodied Kenny Frease and a number of suspensions for players on both teams.

According to Koch’s report, the game will be played on a neutral site — at US Bank Arena — “on Dec. 18, 19 or 20 and will be televised on one of the ESPN channels.” It would be the first time in 25 years that the game hasn’t taken place on the campus of one of the two participating schools.

The catch in Koch’s article, however, is at the end of the second paragraph: “an official announcement expected in June.”

That sentence matters because on Tuesday afternoon, a good six hours after Koch’s story spread across the college basketball intrawebs, a statement was released by the presidents of both universities saying:

The University of Cincinnati and Xavier University were both surprised to see today’s announcement concerning the future of the Crosstown Shootout. While both schools are committed to the future of the Crosstown rivalry, specific discussions are ongoing and no details have been finalized. We look forward to sharing our plans with the community at an appropriate time in the coming weeks.

Does that mean that the agreement has been made but pen hasn’t yet been put to paper, or is this truly a decision that is still up for discussion?

Whatever the case may be, I am of the belief that moving the event away from campus sites would be a mistake. As Mike DeCourcy, a Cincinnati resident that knows the rivalry as well as anyone, points out, the beauty of the game is how rare is was to see a fan of the visiting team in attendance. It was a point of pride for each fanbase to prevent the opposing color from entering the building.

So what happens when you put these two fanbases together?

Given the amount of attention that this fight received, I don’t expect there to be an issue among the fans. At the end of the day, the brawl was an embarrassment for the entire city, regardless of whether or not you wear red or blue. I would expect fans to be on their best behavior, but, as anyone that is passionate about a sports team knows, once the game starts, emotions can take over — especially when both sides have spent a few pregame hours at their favorite watering hole.

My question is what, exactly, the two sides would be hoping to accomplish by moving to a neutral site. The issue isn’t the crowd; the issue is the players on the court and the way the game is played. DeCourcy says it best: ”

The administrations of each school apparently believed they needed to change something if they wanted to continue playing the game. If the rivalry truly was contaminated, and one could argue it wasn’t in the least, then it needed a cure. What the game didn’t need was botched cosmetic surgery.”

Changing the venue does nothing to fix the trash-talk, the hard fouls or the inability of the referees to control the action. I’d even argue that the new environs won’t even be quite as sterile, not when every single whistle — regardless of who the call benefits — is greeted with a chorus of boos.

If this is what the game needs to continue being played, than I guess a move to a neutral court isn’t necessarily a bad thing. But that doesn’t mean it was the right decision.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

POSTERIZED: Wyoming’s Josh Adams takes flight

Josh Adams
Associated Press
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Not only is Wyoming senior guard Josh Adams the lone returning starter from a team that won the Mountain West tournament last season, but he’s also one of college basketball’s best dunkers. And if anyone may have forgotten about his jumping ability, Adams put it on display Saturday during the Cowboys’ win over Montana State.

After splitting two Montana State players at the top of the key Adams attacked the basket, dunking with two hands over a late-arriving help-side defender. If you’re going to rotate over, have to do it quicker than that.

Video credit: Wyoming Athletics

Defensive progress will determine No. 4 Iowa State’s ceiling

Monte Morris
Associated Press
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Even with the coaching change from Fred Hoiberg to Steve Prohm, No. 4 Iowa State remains one of the nation’s best offensive teams. Given their skills on that end of the floor many teams find it tough to go score for score with the Cyclones, and that’s what happened to Illinois in Iowa State’s 84-73 win in the Emerald Coast Classic title game.

Georges Niang scored 23 points and grabbed eight rebounds, with Monté Morris adding 20, nine rebounds and six assists and Abdel Nader 18 points as the Cyclones moved to 5-0 on the season. The three-pointers weren’t falling in the second half, as Iowa State shot 0-f0r-12, but they shot 19-for-24 inside of the arc to pull away from a team that lost big man Mike Thorne Jr. late in the first half to a left knee injury.

Illinois’ loss of size in the paint opened things up offensively for Iowa State, and the Cyclones took advantage. But where this group grabbed control of the game was on the defensive end of the floor, and that will be the key for a team with Big 12 and national title aspirations.

Nader took on the responsibility of defending Illinois’ Malcolm Hill (20 points) in the second half and did a solid job of keeping the junior wing in check, with that serving as the spark to a 12-2 run that put the game away. There’s no denying that the Cyclones can put points on the board; most of the talent from last season is back and the productivity on that end of the floor hasn’t changed as a result. Niang’s one of the nation’s best forwards, and both Morris (who now ranks among the country’s best point guards) and Nader have taken significant strides in their respective games.

Iowa State will add Deonte Burton in December, giving them another option to call upon. Front court depth is a bit of a concern, as Iowa State can ill afford to lose a Niang or Jameel McKay, but there’s enough on the roster to compensate for that and force mismatches in other areas.

But the biggest question for this group is how effective they can become at stringing together stops. Illinois certainly had its moments in both halves Saturday night, but Iowa State also showed during the game’s decisive stretch that they can step up defensively. The key now is to do so consistently, and if that occurs the Cyclones can be a threat both within the Big 12 and nationally.