Jim Calhoun

Is Jim Calhoun more likeable if he watches American Idol?

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Thursday was Jim Calhoun’s 70th birthday, and, as Dan Martin laid out for you, things haven’t exactly been great from Calhoun since he turned 69.

John Calipari is Public Enemy No. 1 when it comes to college basketball coaches, but few would argue if you put Calhoun second on that list. Not only are his methods of recruiting just as, if not more, questionable that Calipari’s, but he’s no where near the salesmen that the Kentucky head coach is. Where Calipari is charm and charisma, Calhoun comes off as a surly curmudgeon.

You haven’t cut your teeth as a college basketball writer until you’ve had Calhoun snap at you in a press conference.

That’s just who Calhoun is, and as Don Amore — the Hartford Courant’s UConn beat-writer — artfully laid out in this profile of Calhoun, there is a reason that Calhoun is such a popular figure in Connecticut. The architect of the UConn program does have his detractors, however:

He also can’t change the criticism that comes at times. There was the day a political activist got into a press conference and asked if Calhoun intended to give back any of his salary given the hard economic times. Calhoun shouted “not a dime” in a moment that still lives on YouTube. Just 13 months removed from his most recent championship, he remains a coach who rubs some the wrong way.

“The passion of the people here,” he says, “there’s always a very thin line between love and hate, depending on the day, the recruit, the kid who didn’t play as well as they thought. But the worst thing to have, when I came here, was apathy. I would rather have the hatred or the love, but you can’t have apathy. I don’t think anybody has ever said I lacked for passion.”

“You hear from the 5 percent — my players call them ‘the haters’ — the discontented, but I’m much more fulfilled when I go in the morning to get my papers, get my banana, get my coffee, and people say, ‘Coach, how’s your back? ‘Coach, we want you to stay.’ Those little things mean a lot. I cut stone, made candy, ribbon candy, worked at a gas station after my dad died. Those [working-class] guys appreciate the fact that maybe you say, ‘I worked hard for this and it’s mine.’ And, oh, by the way, I’ve probably raised a million dollars for charity in a given year. So don’t tell me about ‘one thin dime’ that I’m not giving back. I’ll make those choices.”

That last paragraph may be the most “Calhoun” quote that’s ever been published.

I strongly suggest any college hoops fan — especially UConn fans — read through that profile, as there are plenty of interesting nuggets in there, from Calhoun’s daily breakfast routine (a stack of papers, two coffees and a banana from his local gas station) to the nickname that Caron Butler has for him (Pops).

The most interesting, however, is tucked away into one of the final paragraphs. Calhoun, apparently, has plans to attend the finale of ‘American Idol’. According to Aaron Torres, who wrote a book on UConn’s run to the 2011 national title, Calhoun watches the show religiously.

You don’t say …

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

Utah State denies transfer David Collette a release

David Collette Goodluck Okonoboh
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Utah State has denied former forward David Collette a release, saying that his decision to leave the program two days before the start of the season left them without an adequate way to replace last season’s second-leading scorer and was unduly influenced by tampering from other coaching staffs.

“I think there were a lot of factors in play that, unfortunately, have become a trend in college basketball of schools poaching other schools’ players,” head coach Tim Duryea said in a Nov. 11th release announcing the transfer. “I don’t feel good and don’t like how things transpired.”

But that’s not how Collette, who averaged 12.8 points as a redshirt freshman, said things went down. He says he left the team because he and Duryea did not get along. Duryea was a longtime assistant for former head coach Stew Morrill.

The allegations Collette has made range from worrisome to embarrassingly petty. He told Yahoo! Sports and ESPN that the team was told not to tell anyone about a fight in practice, that the school immediately pulled all his athletic aid and that they went as far as to change his measurements on the team site from 6-foot-10, 235 pounds to 6-foot-8, 220 pounds.

Now trying to keep a practice fight off the media’s radar isn’t a huge issue; they happen more than you think and are a bigger deal as a headline than in the locker room. And if Collette is no longer on the team, he is no longer doing the work required to get that aid. Nothing wrong with that, either.

But changing what he’s listed at on the team site? Refusing to release, which prohibits him from being recruited by other coaching staffs and will force him to pay his own way at his new school for two semesters?

Bitter, petty and unnecessary.

This story is now a headline on three of the biggest sports websites. Pretty soon Jay Bilas will be railing against it on twitter, and probably on a broadcast, too; Utah State plays Duke next.

This is going to be a wave of negative publicity for a Utah State program that A) doesn’t make many national headlines, and B) Might actually be pretty good this year.

Is that really worth getting revenge on some college sophomore that doesn’t like playing for you?

Labissiere scores 16 as top-ranked Kentucky beats BU 82-62

Eric Johnson, Isaiah Briscoe
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LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) Freshman center Skal Labissiere scored 16 points to lead top-ranked Kentucky past Boston University 82-62 on Tuesday night.

The Wildcats (5-0) used a big second half to overcome Boston U. in their season debut at No. 1 in The Associated Press Top 25 poll. One day after taking over the top spot, Kentucky struggled to put away the Terriers early but outscored them 42-29 in the second half.

Labissiere finished 7 of 13 from the field and grabbed seven rebounds. Tyler Ulis added 15 points, and Alex Poythress had 14 points and 10 rebounds off the bench for his second straight double-double.

Jamal Murray scored 12 points and Isaiah Briscoe had 11. Kentucky, which spent all of last season ranked No. 1, scored 58 points in the paint and closed with a 22-9 run.

Boston University (2-3) got 15 points from John Papale. Nathan Dieudonne and Kyle Foreman scored 11 apiece.

The Wildcats raced out to a 10-0 lead 3 minutes into the game, but Boston University settled down after making its first basket and kept the score close in the first half by hitting five shots from long range.

The Terriers led 34-33 with 2 minutes remaining in the first half, but the Wildcats scored the last six points of the period to regain the lead.

Labissiere paced the Wildcats with 11 points in the first half, followed by Murray with 10.


Kentucky: The Wildcats improved to 216-28 as the top-ranked team in the country and have won 61 of their last 64 games while holding the top spot. Under coach John Calipari, Kentucky is 63-5 as the top-ranked team in the AP poll.

Boston University: The Terriers fell to 0-5 against Kentucky. … Boston University missed its first four shots and didn’t score its first basket until the 16:55 mark of the first half. … Dieudonne, a graduate of Louisville Trinity, was Kentucky’s Mr. Basketball in 2012.


Kentucky plays Friday against South Florida at the Hoophall Miami Invitational.

Boston University plays Saturday at Binghamton.