Jim Calhoun

Is Jim Calhoun more likeable if he watches American Idol?

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Thursday was Jim Calhoun’s 70th birthday, and, as Dan Martin laid out for you, things haven’t exactly been great from Calhoun since he turned 69.

John Calipari is Public Enemy No. 1 when it comes to college basketball coaches, but few would argue if you put Calhoun second on that list. Not only are his methods of recruiting just as, if not more, questionable that Calipari’s, but he’s no where near the salesmen that the Kentucky head coach is. Where Calipari is charm and charisma, Calhoun comes off as a surly curmudgeon.

You haven’t cut your teeth as a college basketball writer until you’ve had Calhoun snap at you in a press conference.

That’s just who Calhoun is, and as Don Amore — the Hartford Courant’s UConn beat-writer — artfully laid out in this profile of Calhoun, there is a reason that Calhoun is such a popular figure in Connecticut. The architect of the UConn program does have his detractors, however:

He also can’t change the criticism that comes at times. There was the day a political activist got into a press conference and asked if Calhoun intended to give back any of his salary given the hard economic times. Calhoun shouted “not a dime” in a moment that still lives on YouTube. Just 13 months removed from his most recent championship, he remains a coach who rubs some the wrong way.

“The passion of the people here,” he says, “there’s always a very thin line between love and hate, depending on the day, the recruit, the kid who didn’t play as well as they thought. But the worst thing to have, when I came here, was apathy. I would rather have the hatred or the love, but you can’t have apathy. I don’t think anybody has ever said I lacked for passion.”

“You hear from the 5 percent — my players call them ‘the haters’ — the discontented, but I’m much more fulfilled when I go in the morning to get my papers, get my banana, get my coffee, and people say, ‘Coach, how’s your back? ‘Coach, we want you to stay.’ Those little things mean a lot. I cut stone, made candy, ribbon candy, worked at a gas station after my dad died. Those [working-class] guys appreciate the fact that maybe you say, ‘I worked hard for this and it’s mine.’ And, oh, by the way, I’ve probably raised a million dollars for charity in a given year. So don’t tell me about ‘one thin dime’ that I’m not giving back. I’ll make those choices.”

That last paragraph may be the most “Calhoun” quote that’s ever been published.

I strongly suggest any college hoops fan — especially UConn fans — read through that profile, as there are plenty of interesting nuggets in there, from Calhoun’s daily breakfast routine (a stack of papers, two coffees and a banana from his local gas station) to the nickname that Caron Butler has for him (Pops).

The most interesting, however, is tucked away into one of the final paragraphs. Calhoun, apparently, has plans to attend the finale of ‘American Idol’. According to Aaron Torres, who wrote a book on UConn’s run to the 2011 national title, Calhoun watches the show religiously.

You don’t say …

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

Ellis, Lucas lead No. 6 Kansas past No. 10 West Virginia

Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) blocks a shot by West Virginia guard Tarik Phillip (12) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Lawrence, Kan., Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
AP Photo/Orlin Wagner
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In the first meeting between No. 10 West Virginia and No. 6 Kansas, the Mountaineers dominated in their 74-63 win in Morgantown. Bob Huggins’ “Press Virginia” attack forced 22 Kansas turnovers, with the Jayhawks playing far too fast and loose with the basketball while also getting out-toughed by the Mountaineers. In the rematch Kansas (20-4, 8-3 Big 12) looked far better equipped to deal with West Virginia in both of those areas, winning by the final score of 75-65.

Kansas committed 15 turnovers, with Devonte’ Graham responsible for five of them, but they did not allow West Virginia (19-4, 8-3) to use those chances to kickstart their offense. The Mountaineers scored 13 points (one fewer than Kansas, which took advantage of ten WVU miscues) off of those turnovers and did not register a single fast break points. Having to play in the half-court more than they would have liked, West Virginia could not execute at the level they did in beating Baylor Saturday.

As a result Bob Huggins’ team shot 37.3 percent from the field and 5-for-20 from beyond the arc. The Mountaineers have shown signs of being able to win games in which they don’t force a high turnover count, but that wasn’t the case at Allen Fieldhouse.

If not for West Virginia grabbing better than 34 percent of their misses and scoring 14 second-chance points, the margin is likely even greater than the ten-point outcome due to the contract in offensive execution. Kansas pushed the ball early, getting out to an 8-0 lead, and as the game wore on the Jayhawks were much better in finding quality shot opportunities. Bill Self’s team shot 56.1 percent from the field with Perry Ellis scoring 21 points to lead five Jayhawks in double figures.

The tandem of Ellis and Landen Lucas, who grabbed a game-high 16 rebounds, won the battle against a WVU front court missing the suspended Jonathan Holton. Devin Williams, who went for 17 and 12 in the first meeting, finished the rematch with a respectable 14-point, nine-rebound effort but he didn’t get much help in the post from the likes of Elijah Macon and Nathan Adrian.

After having Self question their toughness in a home win over Kansas State six days ago, the Jayhawks have responded with wins over TCU and West Virginia. Obviously it’s tough to read too much into beating the Horned Frogs, because even with that game being in Fort Worth it’s one Kansas was expected to handle with ease. The Mountaineers posed a different, and far more rigorous test, and Kansas got the job done.

As a result the Jayhawks have brought West Virginia back to the pack in the Big 12 title race, making Saturday’s game at No. 3 Oklahoma even bigger than it already was.

VIDEO: North Carolina head coach Roy Williams collapses on sideline

Roy Williams
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North Carolina head coach Roy Williams collapsed during the second half of No. 2 North Carolina’s visit to Boston College on Tuesday night:

Roy Williams has dealt with vertigo in the past; it’s not abnormal for him to collapse on the sideline during games, and given that his team is currently losing to Boston College, it’s understandable that he may have screamed himself dizzy.

He had to be helped off the floor:

It does appear that this isn’t something serious, according to a North Carolina release, that said Williams is “doing OK”.