Early Entry: Who made the right decision?

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Read through the rest of our Early Entry breakdowns here.

Trey Burke, Michigan: Once Michigan was knocked out of the NCAA tournament, rumors started flying that Burke would be putting his name into the NBA Draft. The combination of a great freshman campaign and a relatively weak point guard class could have been enough to push the Columbus, OH, native into the first round. Burke, eventually, made the decision to comeback, which will probably be for the best. He has a chance to be an all-american and make a Final Four. That’s a lot to give up with a chance of falling into the second round.

Isaiah Canaan, Murray State: Canaan had an all-american campaign for the Racers as a junior, but the sharp-shooter made the correct decision to return to school for his senior season. He’s 6-foot-1 on a good day and a scoring guard through and through.

Andre Drummond, UConn: A lot of people are going to question Drummond’s decision to enter the draft after a freshman season that was equal parts tantalizing and disappointing. Drummond has all the talent in the world and enough potential to legitimately end up being an All-Star at the next level, but nothing he did at the collegiate level would lead you to believe that he will fulfill that potential. So why is it a good decision to leave? A) He can develop his skills in the NBA just as well as he could in college. B) He’s projected as a top three pick. He’s not making himself more money by returning to school. C) The only thing another year in college could do is hurt his stock, and he would be taking that risk without the potential to play in the tournament. This was a no-brainer.

John Henson, North Carolina: Henson has his flaws as a prospect — he’s too slender, he needs to add bulk and he needs to refine his post game — but his strengths are as evident as any prospect in this draft — he’s a terrific defender and rebounder with a better-than-you-think mid-range jump shot and baby hook. I just don’t see what he can gain by returning to North Carolina to be a defensive sidekick, once again, to sophomore James Michael McAdoo.

Damian Lillard, Weber State: Lillard’s stock is as high as it is going to get right now, and he’s leaving school in a year where the point guard class is fairly weak. Don’t be fooled by the name of the school he went to, Lillard is the complete package at the point — athletic, efficient and the rare combination of an elite scorer that can be too unselfish at times.

Fab Melo, Syracuse: Did he really have a choice? The guy is a projected first-round pick that was twice ruled academically ineligible as a sophomore.

Jared Sullinger, Ohio State: I may be in the minority, but I think Sullinger is going to be a very good NBA player. While much was made about his decision to return to school and the bad year that he had, people tend to forget that Sullinger’s production barely dropped while playing with a supporting cast that was no where near as dangerous as the group that surrounded him as a freshman. Oh, and he still managed to lead his team to the Final Four and a share of the Big Ten regular season title despite playing with a bad back and plantar fasciitis.

Deshaun Thomas, Ohio State: Thomas had a sensational NCAA tournament that came on the heels of a terrific finish to the season, but there are still plenty of question marks about him as a prospect. Can he be more consistent? What position does he play? Can he actually shoot the ball? An extra year will help him a great deal.

Royce White, Iowa State: The most interesting thing about White as an NBA prospect is that he is a player without a position because he simply does too many things well. He’ll be well worth the risk of a mid-to-late first round pick if he can get over his fear of flying.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

VIDEO: Jay-Z’s nephew posterizes nation’s No. 1 recruit Marvin Bagley III

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Nahziah Carter is an unsigned 6-foot-6 wing in the Class of 2017.

He’s also Jay-Z’s nephew, and he just so happened to posterize Marvin Bagley III — the clearcut No. 1 prospect in the Class of 2018 — while Hova was in the stands watching him.

NCAA denies extra-year request by NC State guard Henderson

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NCAA has denied North Carolina State guard Terry Henderson’s request for another year of eligibility.

Henderson announced the decision Friday in a statement issued by the school.

The Raleigh native played two seasons at West Virginia before transferring to N.C. State and redshirting in 2014-15. He played for only 7 minutes of the following season before suffering a season-ending ankle injury.

As a redshirt senior in 2016-17, he was the team’s second-leading scorer at 13.8 points per game and made a team-best 78 3-pointers.

Henderson called it “an honor and privilege” to play in his hometown.

SMU gets transfer in Georgetown’s Akoy Agau

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SMU pulled in a frontcourt player in Georgetown transfer Akoy Agau, a source confirmed to NBCSports.com. Agau is immediately eligible for next season as a graduate transfer.

The 6-foot-8 Agau started his career at Louisville before transferring to Georgetown after one season. Spending two seasons with the Hoyas, Agau was limited to 11 minutes in his first season due to injuries. He averaged 4.5 points and 4.3 rebounds per game last season.

Coming out of high school, Agau was a four-star prospect but he’s never lived up to that billing in-part because of injuries. Now, Agau gets one more chance to make a difference as he’s hoping to help replace some departed pieces like Ben Moore and Semi Ojeleye.

South Carolina loses big man Sedee Keita to transfer

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South Carolina big man Sedee Keita will transfer from the program, he announced on Friday.

The 6-foot-9 Keita was once regarded as a top-100 national prospect in the Class of 2016, but he never found consistent minutes with the Gamecocks for last season’s Final Four team.

Keita appeared in 29 games and averaged 1.1 points and 2.0 rebounds per game while shooting 27 percent from the field.

A native of Philadelphia, Keita will have to sit out next season before getting three more seasons of eligibility.

Although Keita failed to make an impact during his only season at South Carolina, he’ll be a coveted transfer thanks to his size and upside.

Mississippi State losing two to transfer

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Mississippi State will lose two players to transfer as freshmen Mario Kegler and Eli Wright are leaving the program.

Both Kegler and Wright were four-star prospects coming out of high school as they were apart of a six-man recruiting class that is supposed to be a major foundation for Ben Howland’s future with the Bulldogs.

The 6-foot-7 Kegler was Mississippi State’s third-leading scorer last season as he averaged 9.7 points and 5.5 rebounds per game. Kegler should command some quality schools on the transfer market, especially since he’ll still have three more years of eligibility after sitting out next season due to NCAA transfer regulations. Kegler’s loss is also notable for Mississippi State because it is the second consecutive offseason that Howland lost a top-100, in-state product to transfer after only one season after Malik Newman left for Kansas.

Wright, a 6-foot-4 guard, was never able to find consistent minutes as he was already behind underclass perimeter options like Quinndary Weatherspoon, Lamar Peters and Tyson Carter last season. With Nick Weatherspoon, Quinndary’s four-star brother, also joining the Bulldogs next season, the writing was likely on the wall that Wright wasn’t going to earn significant playing time.