Early Entry: Who made the right decision?

5 Comments

Read through the rest of our Early Entry breakdowns here.

Trey Burke, Michigan: Once Michigan was knocked out of the NCAA tournament, rumors started flying that Burke would be putting his name into the NBA Draft. The combination of a great freshman campaign and a relatively weak point guard class could have been enough to push the Columbus, OH, native into the first round. Burke, eventually, made the decision to comeback, which will probably be for the best. He has a chance to be an all-american and make a Final Four. That’s a lot to give up with a chance of falling into the second round.

Isaiah Canaan, Murray State: Canaan had an all-american campaign for the Racers as a junior, but the sharp-shooter made the correct decision to return to school for his senior season. He’s 6-foot-1 on a good day and a scoring guard through and through.

Andre Drummond, UConn: A lot of people are going to question Drummond’s decision to enter the draft after a freshman season that was equal parts tantalizing and disappointing. Drummond has all the talent in the world and enough potential to legitimately end up being an All-Star at the next level, but nothing he did at the collegiate level would lead you to believe that he will fulfill that potential. So why is it a good decision to leave? A) He can develop his skills in the NBA just as well as he could in college. B) He’s projected as a top three pick. He’s not making himself more money by returning to school. C) The only thing another year in college could do is hurt his stock, and he would be taking that risk without the potential to play in the tournament. This was a no-brainer.

John Henson, North Carolina: Henson has his flaws as a prospect — he’s too slender, he needs to add bulk and he needs to refine his post game — but his strengths are as evident as any prospect in this draft — he’s a terrific defender and rebounder with a better-than-you-think mid-range jump shot and baby hook. I just don’t see what he can gain by returning to North Carolina to be a defensive sidekick, once again, to sophomore James Michael McAdoo.

Damian Lillard, Weber State: Lillard’s stock is as high as it is going to get right now, and he’s leaving school in a year where the point guard class is fairly weak. Don’t be fooled by the name of the school he went to, Lillard is the complete package at the point — athletic, efficient and the rare combination of an elite scorer that can be too unselfish at times.

Fab Melo, Syracuse: Did he really have a choice? The guy is a projected first-round pick that was twice ruled academically ineligible as a sophomore.

Jared Sullinger, Ohio State: I may be in the minority, but I think Sullinger is going to be a very good NBA player. While much was made about his decision to return to school and the bad year that he had, people tend to forget that Sullinger’s production barely dropped while playing with a supporting cast that was no where near as dangerous as the group that surrounded him as a freshman. Oh, and he still managed to lead his team to the Final Four and a share of the Big Ten regular season title despite playing with a bad back and plantar fasciitis.

Deshaun Thomas, Ohio State: Thomas had a sensational NCAA tournament that came on the heels of a terrific finish to the season, but there are still plenty of question marks about him as a prospect. Can he be more consistent? What position does he play? Can he actually shoot the ball? An extra year will help him a great deal.

Royce White, Iowa State: The most interesting thing about White as an NBA prospect is that he is a player without a position because he simply does too many things well. He’ll be well worth the risk of a mid-to-late first round pick if he can get over his fear of flying.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

2017 NCAA Tournament Final Four schedule, tip times, and announcer pairings

(Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
1 Comment

National Semifinals– Saturday, April 1

6:09 p.m. EST, CBS, Glendale
No. 7 South Carolina vs. No. 1 Gonzaga (Jim Nantz, Grant Hill, Bill Raftery, Tracy Wolfson)

Approximately 40 minutes after conclusion of first game, CBS, Glendale
No. 1 North Carolina vs. No. 3 Oregon (Jim Nantz, Grant Hill, Bill Raftery, Tracy Wolfson)

VIDEO: The insane final 10 seconds of North Carolina’s win over Kentucky

(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
1 Comment

North Carolina and Kentucky ended in legendary fashion on Sunday.

After freshman Malik Monk buried a heavily-contested three-pointer to tie the game at 73-all for Kentucky with under 10 seconds left the Tar Heels didn’t use a timeout as Theo Pinson found forward Luke Maye for the game-winning jumper.

These 10 seconds will go down as one of the greatest finishes in NCAA Tournament history.

No. 1 seed North Carolina outlasts No. 2 seed Kentucky to advance to the Final Four

(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
1 Comment

North Carolina advanced to the Final Four for the second consecutive season and 20th time overall as the No. 1 seed Tar Heels outlasted No. 2 seed Kentucky, 75-73, during Sunday’s South Regional final in Memphis.

Reserve forward Luke Maye knocked in the game-winning jumper for the Tar Heels with 0.3 seconds left to break a 73-all tie after Kentucky’s Malik Monk tied the game with a three-pointer on the previous possession.

The Tar Heels (31-7) overcame an ankle issue from junior point guard Joel Berry as North Carolina was led by Justin Jackson’s 19 points.

Maye also stepped up with a big game for North Carolina as he continued his strong March with 17 points. Berry added 11 points, as he went to the locker room during the first half to get his ankle looked at before returning to play later in the half.

Kentucky (32-6) won the regular-season matchup of these teams, 103-100, in Las Vegas in December as their freshmen guards struggled to perform on Sunday. After De’Aaron Fox and Malik Monk combined for 71 points in that previous win over the Tar Heels, the two freshmen studs couldn’t get going.

Both of them dealt with first-half foul trouble as Fox finished with 13 points while Monk was held to 12 points. Also battling foul trouble in the first half, freshman Bam Adebayo added 13 points for the Wildcats.

With Fox and Monk struggling to generate consistent offense, the Wildcats were able to stay in the game thanks to great performances from reserves like Isaac Humphries (career-high 12 points) and senior Dominique Hawkins (10 points.

North Carolina advances to face No. 3 seed Oregon in next weekend’s Final Four.

VIDEO: South Carolina celebrates Final Four trip by dousing Frank Martin in water

(Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
Leave a comment

South Carolina earned its first trip to the Final Four with its win over SEC-rival Florida on Sunday.

The Gamecocks made sure to celebrate properly when head coach Frank Martin hit the locker room after the game by dousing him in water before Martin gave another speech.

https://twitter.com/marchmadness/status/846124174259118080/video/1

VIDEO: Darius Rucker tears up as South Carolina advances to the Final Four

Leave a comment

Darius Rucker, the former front man of Hootie and the Blowfish and a current star in the country music world, is a lifelong South Carolina Gamecocks fan.

This isn’t really a secret.

Hell, on Friday night at a concert he was playing, Rucker set up TVs so that he would be able to watch South Carolina take on Baylor:

You probably didn’t realize just how big of a fan he actually is until you saw him, sitting second row at the regional final in New York City on Sunday afternoon, tearing up as the Gamecocks advanced to the Final Four:

Let ’em cry, Darius, if the tears fall down like rain.