NCAA Basketball Tournament - Baylor v Kentucky

UK title hopes could depend on which Terrence Jones shows up

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A lot of Division I players have come out of Jefferson High School in north Portland, Oregon, but Terrence Jones has all the tools to be the best of them. Jones led the school to three consecutive State titles, was ranked amongst the nation’s top-10 prep prospects by both Scout and ESPN, and played in the 2010 McDonald’s All-American game.

In his first college game he had Kentucky fans salivating over his 25 point, 12 rebound performance. The former high school point guard (as a freshman) displayed a skill set uncommon in his players his size. He could score from anywhere. He could handle the ball. He could defend and rebound. He displayed surprising footwork for a player not used to the post, and could finish over either shoulder.

But as the season wore on, his game displayed some cracks.

He failed to consistently play strong, and instead opted to avoid contact. His deep jumper suddenly didn’t look like a very good option. And most importantly, he regularly lost both his focus and his emotional control. And as a player who openly shows how he’s feeling, everyone in the building noticed. It didn’t help when his own coach exploded on him during a January game.

Still, as a freshman, he led the Wildcats in rebounding and finished 2nd in scoring with 15.7 points per game.

After he withdrew from the 2011 NBA draft and elected to return to Kentucky, it was expected that his role would diminish. After all, Anthony Davis, Marquis Teague and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist were on board to shoulder portions of the load.

Everything started just fine. Kentucky raced to an 8-0 start with a few impressive wins. Jones was playing well. His teammates were jelling. And then came Indiana.

Jones only scored 4 points and had 6 turnovers in the Kentucky loss. And in the next game he was scoreless in 10 minutes before suffering a gruesome pinky injury. When he returned, he only averaged 7 points a game as Kentucky wrapped up their out of conference schedule. The Kentucky lineup was still fear inducing, but without Jones playing well they looked vulnerable.

But then, once again, things began to click.  He had 20 against South Carolina. 27 points and 9 boards against LSU. He had a double-double against Ole Miss, another against LSU, and a 3rd in their SEC final loss to Vanderbilt (when Darius Miller and Doron Lamb combined to go 3-16 from beyond the arc). He opened this tournament with a 22 point, 10 rebound performance, and seemed to be playing at a very high level.

But then he only had 8 points while fouling out against Iowa State. He had a decent 12 point game against Indiana and then 12 points, 9 boards and 6 assists against Baylor.

It’s probably unfair to monitor him on a game to game basis, but as a player he’s proven that he needs that level of scrutiny. He might be surrounded by first round draft picks, but four of them are freshmen. He’s only a sophomore, but on this team that makes him a veteran. And Kentucky could very well need that leadership to survive this weekend. He’s got the talent. He’s got the game. Now he just needs to play focused, under control, and ready to win the battle on the next possession.

LATE NIGHT SNACKS: Syracuse wins Atlantis, Miami gets upset

Brad Horrigan/The Courant via AP
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(This will be updated throughout the day.)

GAME OF THE DAY: Syracuse 74, No. 25 Texas A&M 67

The Orange got 20 points from Michael Gbinije and 15 points and five assists from Trevor Cooney as they won the Battle 4 Atlantis title on Friday afternoon. We wrote on this game earlier. Are the Orange for real this year?


No. 10 Gonzaga 73, No. 17 UConn 70: Eric McClellan and Kyle Dranginis made some big plays down the stretch as the Bulldogs held on to win a game they led by as much as 21 in the second half. Kyle Wiltjer scored a team-best 17 points for Gonzaga, which finished third at the Battle 4 Atlantis. Rob Dauster wrote more about the Bulldogs and their second-half performance here.

Alabama 64, No. 20 Wichita State 60: Not only did the Shockers drop their second straight at the AdvoCare Invitational, but they also saw Anton Grady leave the game on a stretcher after being involved in a scary second-half collision. He was awake and alert shortly after leaving the court. While the Shockers’ losses to USC and Alabama don’t help them from an NCAA tournament standpoint, the bigger issue is the team’s health.


Quincy Ford, Northeastern: Not only did he score 24 points in the upset win over No. 15 Miami, but he hit the game-winning jumper, too. Video here.


Wichita State’s bigs: Five of them (Anton Grady, Zach Brown, Rashard Kelly, Bush Wakumota, Eric Hamilton) finished a combined 3-for-21 from the floor with 14 points and 14 fouls. Wakumota shot one of the worst threes you’ll ever see with Wichita State down 62-60 with 10 seconds left.

Grady suffered a scary neck injury late in the game, but early reports sound positive.


  • Jamal Murray went for 21 points and three assists without a turnover at No. 1 Kentucky rolled over South Florida. The big question: How bad is Tyler Ulis’ elbow injury?
  • Jalen Brunson and Josh Hart both had 13 points as No. 8 Villanova knocked off Georgia Tech to win the Preseason NIT, 69-52.
  • No. 23 Xavier raced out of the gates against USC and led by as much as 32, going on to win 87-77 in Orlando. Trevon Bluiett led four Musketeers in double figures with 16 points and James Farr added 12 to go along with nine rebounds off the bench.


  • Stanford finished third at the Preseason NIT with a 69-66 win over Arkansas, closing the game on a stunning 21-1 run. Rosco Allen scored eight of his career-high 25 points during that run, and Marcus Allen’s goal-tended layup with 2.6 seconds remaining gave the Cardinal the lead for good.

Good luck Goodluck: UNLV’s Okonoboh to transfer

Goodluck Okonoboh
AP Photo/Orlin Wagner
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UNLV sophomore Goodluck Okonoboh is transferring out of the program, a source told

The 6-foot-10 center was the No. 31 recruit in the Class of 2014, but he never was able to find a place in the UNLV rotation. He averaged 2.9 blocks as a freshman, but is a career 34 percent free throw shooter that never proved he could be more than just an athlete.

With Ben Carter getting eligible and UNLV landing Stephen Zimmerman this season, Okonoboh’s minutes dried up. He played just 19 minutes total against UCLA and Indiana.