The Morning Mix

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– You will want to keep a running tab on the following link. It’s the “Circle of March” from Rush The Court. It’s pretty self-explanatory. But it’s also also pretty awesome

– When court-storming goes wrong: Technical foul assessed to fans costs Delaware State the game. Since February 1st, six of the Hornet’s games have been won in the final minute or in overtime. They had won four of the previous five.

– Former-Jayhawk Marcus Morris was cited for misdemeanor battery while in Lawrence for the Kansas/Missouri game over the weekend

– Keiton Page doesn’t get nearly the credit he deserves. But Tyshawn Taylor is trying to change that

– Speaking of Tyshawn Taylor, can we stop doubting him already? C.J. Moore explains why Taylor feeds off of doubt

– Missouri head coach Frank Haith is cooperating with the NCAA on Miami’s latest violation probe. The most recent turbulance centers around big man Reggie Johnson, who was declared ineligible prior to Miami’s game against Florida State on Sunday because his family received improper benefits. Haith spent seven years at Miami before taking the job at Missouri this past offseason. Can the Hurricanes still earn a bid if Johnson isn’t able to suit up again?

– It’s official: Kansas has won it’s eight consecutive Big-XII title. Something like that is just unheard of in the current state of college athletics

– What’s the opposite of a Bubble Watch? A breakdown of the one-bid leagues

– Notre Dame looked pretty bad against Georgetown last year. But not everyone is sold on them yet

– In his latest edition of “Hoop Thoughts”, Seth Davis explains why Marquette is deserving of the “elite” billing

– For some bizarre reason, North Carolina’s athletic director is in favor of expanding the NCAA Tournament to 128 teams. His argument is that not a large enough percentage of the college basketball landscape gets a chance to compete in the postseason. How many teams don’t make it out of the N.I.T’s first round? You want all those teams in March Madness?

Wake Forest’s athletic director has a ton of faith in head coach Jeff Bzdelik, and is excited for a bright future

– Gregg Doyel does not believe that John Calipari’s greatness can be measured by just National Championships

– Speaking of Kentucky, John Calipari doesn’t think Michael Kidd-Gilchrist needs another season in college

– Gary Parrish explains why no mid-major team (Except Murray State) can think that a tournament bid is guaranteed

– The Ohio Valley Conference Tournament begins this week. CBS provides a succinct preview of the events

– Bruce Weber has the hottest seat in the country. But there are a few other Big Ten coaches that might start to feel the heat this postseason

The big game out west tonight is between Weber State and Montana for the Big Sky regular season championship

The definitive case for Seth Greenberg as head coach of Virginia Tech

– Duke’s Josh Hairston will miss tonight’s game against Wake Forest because of an injury  after suffering a laceration below his right eye against Virginia Tech this past weekend

Jason Lisk provides the ideal kind of bracket analysis: light on numbers, heavy on information

Tom Izzo’s point is valid, but he’s wrong about the new fouling rules

Eron Harris, Tom Izzo
AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
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On Sunday night, after No. 3 Michigan State knocked off No. 23 Providence in the final of the Wooden Legacy, Spartans head coach Tom Izzo made sure to make his feelings known about the new college basketball officiating mandates.

He doesn’t like them.

At all.

“I just think we’re taking the flow of the game away,” Izzo said. “Maybe it’ll change. We’ll play by the same rules everybody else does. But I think I can voice my opinion to say that I don’t agree with it.”

Part of what frustrated Izzo was that, in a matchup between the two best players in college basketball, both Denzel Valentine and Kris Dunn were sent to the bench with foul trouble.

“I didn’t like it either way,” Izzo said. “I didn’t like having Denzel on the bench, and I didn’t even like watching Dunn on the bench.”

“Don’t tweet this now and leave out the officials,” he added, according to “It’s not their fault. Because that’s the way they’re mandated to call them. So I am really either blaming the rules committee, which ends up on the coaches somewhat. So I’m looking in the mirror and blaming myself because I should have argued it more maybe. I just don’t think it’s fun to have these guys sitting.”

This is nothing new for Izzo. This was calculated. He basically said the same thing after Michigan State, then No. 1 in the country, beat Oklahoma in the Coaches vs. Cancer Classic two seasons ago, when the rules committee tried to implement these same rules. It was his pushback that started the campaign to get rid of the freedom of movement rules.

But here’s the thing: we all knew this was going to happen. We knew there was going to be an adjustment period, for coaches and players and referees alike. In the long run, freedom of movement is good for basketball. It’s part of the reason the NBA is so much fun to watch these days, as their emphasis on the freedom of movement got us out of the days where the Detroit Pistons were winning titles without scoring 80 points.

Physicality is ingrained in college basketball. Coaches teach defense a certain way. Players play defense a certain way. The guys in the NBA are stronger, but the style of play is much more physical in the college game than the pro game. That doesn’t change overnight.

It changes when those rules are enforced and those fouls are called, and, as a result, the players and coaches learn to adjust to them.

Kennesaw State blows eight-point lead in 16 seconds, loses to Elon

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Kennesaw State entered Monday night at 1-6 on the season, but with 19 seconds left, it looked like the Owls have their second of the season locked up. Kendrick Ray made a pair of free throws with 19 seconds left to put KSU up 89-81, and all they had to do was avoid a complete meltdown to get out with a win.

They couldn’t.

A Luke Eddy layup with 16 seconds left cut the lead to six, and after KSU’s Nigel Pruitt missed two free throws, Dainan Swoope his a three with seven seconds left to make the score 89-86.

On the ensuing inbounds, Kennesaw State threw the ball away … and then proceeded to foul Eddy when he was shooting a three. This is what that disaster looked like:

Eddy would hit all three threes before, shockingly, KSU turned the ball over again. Elon could not capitalize this time, sending the game to overtime, where the Phoenix outscored the Owls 14-4.

Elon won 104-94.

Here’s what the comeback looked like on the play-by-play:

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