Mizzou-Kansas was a classic, a perfect way to remember the rivalry

9 Comments

No. 4 Kansas and No. 3 Missouri have played 267 times in the game known as The Border War, one of the most intense rivalries in all of sports. But with Missouri’s impending move to the SEC, this could very well be the last game ever played in the rivalry. Its quite possible — likely, even — that these two teams end up meeting in the Big 12 title game in Kansas City. I wouldn’t rule out the possibility that they end up meeting in the Final Four as well. Two rivals playing four times in a season has happened before (see: Duke and Maryland in 2001), and when you are talking about two of the top six or seven teams in the country, its always a possibility.

But as things stand today, there is not another game between the two teams scheduled and there may not be for the foreseeable future. Its certainly the last game to be played between the two on a campus site for a long time.

With National Player of the Year candidate Thomas Robinson and one of the hottest players in the country in Jeff Withey manning their front line, the question that everyone was asking heading into Kansas’ instant-classic, 87-86 overtime win over Missouri was how the Tigers would deal with that massive front line.

The question we should have been asking? What adjustments do the Jayhawks need to make in order to slowdown Missouri’s four-guard attack, because after surging out to a 44-32 lead at the break, Missouri used an 11-4 run to open up a 55-36 lead on the Jayhawks with just 16:50 left in the game.

So what did Kansas do?

They beat the Tigers at their own game.

Withey was rendered completely ineffective by a bum ankle and the advantage he gave Missouri offensively because of the mismatch, so Bill Self went small. Kevin Young played 28 quality minutes off the bench, finishing with eight boards, four blocks and a pair of dunks in traffic. Then he went smaller, putting four guards around Thomas Robinson and matching up Travis Releford with Kim English at the four.

It worked.

The Jayhawks hit their first five threes in the second half which not only opened up driving lanes for the KU guards to create, it gave Robinson space to go to work in the paint. He scored 11 points as Kansas went on a 24-8 run to force overtime as (who else?) Robinson scored an old-fashioned three-point play to tie the game at 75 and then came up with a block — that every Missouri fan in the country will tell you was a foul — on Phil Pressey to force overtime.

As good as Robinson was down the stretch and as well as Kansas shot to spark the comeback, the reason that the Jayhawks were even in a position to force overtime was due to their defense. Missouri took a 67-51 lead with 10:50 left in the game on a layup from English. The Tigers didn’t score again until a free throw from Phil Pressey pushed the lead back to 10 more than three minutes later. They didn’t hit another field goal until Ricardo Ratliffe scored to push Missouri’s lead to five with 3:50 left to play.

Kansas has the pieces to be a very good defensive team, and they showed it down the stretch as Tyshawn Taylor and Elijah Johnson were able to put all kinds of ball pressure on Mizzou’s back court. As a result, it took away from any kind of rhythm that the Tigers had. Kansas was creating turnovers; rather, their defense was forcing contested jumpers and too much 1-on-1 from the Tigers.

So we went to overtime, which was incredibly fitting.

If this rivalry is going to come to an end, it might as well be in the Game of the Year and we might as well get five extra minutes in the process.

And those five extra minutes certainly didn’t disappoint. Kansas jumped out to a four-point lead, but a pair of threes from Marcus Denmon gave Missouri the lead with 43 seconds left, setting up a perfect ending to what used to be a perfect rivalry. Tyshawn Taylor went back door for a dunk, Denmon answered against with a driving layup to take the lead back before Taylor drove and drew a foul — which, again, every Missouri fan will tell you was a blown call. He knocked down both free throws with 8.3 seconds left. On the final possession, Missouri didn’t even get a shot off as Michael Dixon walked the ball up the floor before dribbling into traffic and watching time expire as he tried to get the ball to Denmon.

It was, in this writer’s estimation, the best game of the year. Better than Duke-UNC, better than Indiana-Kentucky, better than Kentucky-UNC. Without a doubt, those four games will fall into the top five for everyone from this season. The fifth? The first battle between these two teams, a 74-71 win for Missouri back on February 4th.

But you’re right.

Canceling this series because of bruised egos, jealousy and a couple (million) dollars is a great idea.

Our sport doesn’t need games like this to survive.

My mind is still racing after this game, so I’m going to throw in a couple of more thoughts that I had. Because I can. What are you gonna do about it?

– Anthony Davis made him claim for National Player of the Year early on Saturday. He went for 28 points, 11 boards and five blocks in a win over Vanderbilt. I think T-Rob’s answer was solid as well. He matched the 28 points, grabbing 12 boards and making big bucket after big bucket as the Jayhawks came back. You can have an opinion about who deserves the award, but if you believe this is anything more than a dogfight right now, you either go to Kansas or go to Kentucky.

– Troy did a post last week on who he would want taking the final shot. As much as I love Tu Holloway — and I still do, even with Xavier’s collapse — I think Marcus Denmon has taken over that role. He scored the last eight points for Missouri in their win over Kansas. He scored eight points in overtime in this loss, including a three and a runner in the final minute that both game the Tigers the lead. Assassin, bad bad man, stud, beast. Whatever adjective you use, he’s it.

– Kansas secured at least a share of the Big 12 title with this win. Its the eighth straight year they can make that claim. Frankly, that’s unreal. You don’t do that in power conferences. You just don’t.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

Kentucky lands commitment from five-star point guard

Immanuel Quickley (USA Basketball)
Leave a comment

Kentucky landed a commitment from Immanuel Quickley on Friday night, a top ten prospect and arguably the best point guard in the Class of 2018.

Quickley picked the Wildcats over Kansas, who he visited earlier this month, and Miami, who he was scheduled to visit before Hurricane Irma struck south Florida.

The 6-foot-3 point guard is the first commitment in the class of head coach John Calipari, and it really comes as no surprise. He’s been considered a Kentucky lean for months, and Quickley played for Calipari on the USA U19 team during the 2017 FIBA World Cup.

While Quickley has the size and the build – he’s 180 pounds with broad shoulders and long arms – of some of Kentucky’s former elite point guards, he’s not the same kind of point guard as, say, De’Aaron Fox or John Wall. He’s more of a smooth athlete than an explosive one, and while his long strides allow him to get out into transition, he’s not the finisher at the rim that those two were. What he is, however, is an intelligent player. He’s good in ball-screens, he’s an excellent passer and facilitator and he is a good enough shooter that he forces defenses to stay honest. He also has the potential to be a plus defender given his physical tools and the fact that he’ll try on that end of the floor.

Where this commitment gets interesting is the current point guard in Kentucky’s back court, Quade Green. Green was a five-star recruit in his own right, but he’s not quite built as a potential one-and-done prospect. Calipari has maneuvered through two point guards in the past, and each of the last five national champions have played major minutes with two point guards on the floor at the same time, but if Green is back next season that will be something to monitor.

That, however, is a long ways away.

What matters now is that Kentucky has gotten this commitment out of the way, and it paves the way for them to also receive a commitment from Zion Williamson. There has long been talk of those two attending college together, and with Quickley on the board, that likely keeps Kentucky in the driver’s seat as they pursue the South Carolina native.

If Kentucky can also wrangle a commitment out of R.J. Barrett, the No. 1 player in the 2018 recruiting class, that would likely be the end of the discussion of whether or not Duke has surpassed the Wildcats on the recruiting trail.

Five-star forward King picks Oregon

Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Oregon has nabbed one of the top players in the 2018 class.

Louis King, a top-20 forward, committed to Dana Altman and the Ducks on Thursday via a video on social media.

“It’s been a tough, strenuous process,” King said, “but today makes all of that worth it. I’ve been blessed with great opportunities.”

The 6-foot-8 New Jersey native selected Oregon over other finalists Seton Hall, NC State, Purdue and Kansas.

“I would like to thank each of them for all the time and effort they put into my recruitment,” King said. “I would like to thank my coaches and my teammates that have pushed me and helped get me to this point in my career. My friends for all their love and support, but most of all I would like to thank my family, who has been by my side through it all.”

King is Altman’s second commit in 2018, joining four-star big man Miles Norris, a top-75 recruit in the class. It’s the beginning of what could be an absolutely dynamic class for Oregon, which still has two scholarships remaining.

“Out of all of my schools I felt like it was best for me and my family,” King said to MADE Hoops. “Coach Altman said that I would have the ball in my hands throughout the season. When I get there, it will be an easy adjustment for me with how I handle rock and get my teammates open. Our goal is to win a national championship next year.”

 

Four-star forward Miller Kopp commits to Northwestern

Photo by Gene Sweeney Jr./Getty Images
Leave a comment

Northwestern has a second four-star recruit in its 2018 class.

The Wildcats received a commitment from Miller Kopp, a 6-foot-6 forward, on Thursday, he announced via social media.

“I built a really strong relationship with (coach) Chris Collins and I fell in love with the campus,” Kopp told Scout. “I knew it would be a nice campus and have that stuff, but I think me and him are wired the same way. II think that his personality fits mine and I think we complement each other. I’m definitely excited to be able to go to a program on the rise and be able to make some history.”

Kopp picked the Wildcats over offers from Georgetown, Butler, Texas A&M and Vanderbilt. The Houston native is ranked in the top-100 of his class by most recruiting services.

He gives Collins and the Wildcats an exceedingly strong 2018 class, which already featured four-star guard Pete Nance of Ohio along with three-star recruits Jordan Lathon and Ryan Young. It represents a major leap forward for Northwestern. It would appear that the program’s first-ever NCAA tournament appearance last March has brought momentum to the recruiting trail.

 

NEXT ONE? Hoops phenom at 13 has college offer, NBA height

AP Photo/Paul Sancya
Leave a comment

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Emoni Bates walks out a front door of Clague Middle School with just inches to spare.

A wide smile tops his 6-foot-7, extra-lean frame. He’s holding a seventh-grade honor society certificate in his right hand. His braces gleam in the afternoon sun.

Meet the best 13-year-old basketball player in America, according to some recruiting services. One of his highlight reels on YouTube has been viewed about 1 million times.

“I don’t really pay attention to it,” Emoni insists in a voice just louder than a whisper, “because if I pay attention to it, it’s just going to get to my head.

“And I don’t want it to get to my head. I just want to play basketball.”

He’s got the pedigree.

Emoni’s father, E.J. Bates, has been around the game most of his life. He picked greens and baled hay as a kid in nearby Milan, Michigan, then developed into a smooth-shooting guard. But he didn’t take school seriously until it was too late. Instead of playing for a basketball power like Kansas and maybe even in the NBA, E.J. wound up going to Kentucky Wesleyan and settling for pro hoops in Switzerland.

E.J. is determined to make sure his son doesn’t make the same mistake. The academics are a sign of that. House rules bar Emoni from picking up a basketball until his homework is done.

Yet E.J. knows when kids are this good this early, distractions roll in like waves. Already, it seems, lots of people want a piece of Emoni. Prep, private and public high school coaches are lining up. Colleges have him on their radar. DePaul took it a step further, offering Emoni a scholarship in late August. Two other much-touted players in the Class of 2022 — Amari Bailey of Illinois and Skyy Clark of California — also have offers from DePaul.

E.J. knows the shoe company bird dogs and other hustlers looking to buy favors are lurking, too. So he and wife Edith, who works for the Red Cross, keep their inner circle very tight.

“I’m his coach to keep the snakes away,” Bates says, sitting on one of Clague’s concrete benches. “We’re not for sale.”

The Bates family has agreed to provide The Associated Press with a rare, behind-the-scenes look at the life of one of the most coveted basketball prospects in the country for at least the next five years. The periodic series will include video, photos, audio and text updates to track his progress.

Will Emoni stay near his current home to attend a public high school? Or will he take his next step at a private school like Detroit Country Day, like Michigan native Chris Webber?

Will he follow the footsteps of Marvin Bagley III and other five-star prospects, reclassifying to finish high school in three years? Bagley did to play college ball at Duke this coming season — and potentially to get a jump on a pro future.

Will E.J. and Emoni emulate the father-son team of LaVar and Lonzo Ball, grabbing headlines while hawking their own brand at every turn?

No one knows.

E.J. says all options are on the table. But he won’t be loud, unlike LaVar Ball in the lead-up to his son Lonzo being drafted by the Los Angeles Lakers.

“I don’t have to brag about what we’re doing,” E.J. says. “I let other people do all the talking about how good Emoni is because word of mouth is the best advertising there is.”

A POTENTIAL STAR IS BORN

Emoni James-Wayne Bates was born Jan. 28, 2004, at the University of Michigan hospital. He was on the light side — 6 pounds, 7 ounces — and a little long at 21 inches. Just over a year later, Emoni slept with his head cradled in his left arm and his right wrapped around a black and red basketball. A cherished photo was made.

“He would always sleep with the ball,” his father recalls, holding a framed picture in his Ypsilanti, Michigan, home. “If the ball wasn’t around, he would cry about the ball. Even to this day, he has a mini-ball he keeps with him, which is crazy to me.”

There were more hints. During a second visit to the doctor, E.J., who is 6-foot-4, and Edith, 5-9, asked how tall their son might grow.

“He was off the charts,” E.J. laughs, “so they couldn’t tell us.”

Emoni has shot up 7 inches in the last two years. He’s tall enough right now to play shooting guard at any level. He handles the ball like a point guard and launches 3-pointers like a savvy veteran. He can create his own shot like a wing or drive the lane and dish off to a teammate like another rail-thin former prodigy, Golden State Warriors star Kevin Durant.

But adding weight and muscle is an ongoing challenge. He weighs just 155 pounds — not heavy or strong enough to play a dominating inside game that would complement his fluid perimeter skills.

“We try to stuff him full of food at night and hope it sticks,” E.J. sighs.

TEEN CELEBRITY

The Adidas Invitational in Fishers, Indiana, attracts some of the Midwest’s top seventh-grade AAU teams. Inside Best Choice Fieldhouse, talk centers on whether the Bates Fundamentals squad starring Emoni and coached by E.J. can live up to the hype.

“They’ve been hearing a lot about him,” says Bernetta Kelly, watching her son’s Peoria Area Elite team take its shot.

Bates Fundamentals wins 95-44 and Kelly understands why. She approaches Emoni and asks for a photo with her son and his team.

“I’ve seen the best players from Pittsburgh to Vegas the last four years, and he’s been the best in his class,” Peoria coach Zach Martin says. “I told the guys, ‘There are not many times you will be able to say you played an NBA player, but you just did.'”

After another lopsided victory in the two-day tournament won easily by Bates Fundamentals, Emoni walks off the court. A younger competitor darts out of his team’s pregame layup line to slap his hand. Moments later, the excitement follows Emoni out the door.

“Hey, that’s him,” a young boy entering the facility says to teammates.

How does a 10-year-old from Fort Wayne, Indiana, know who Bates is?

“YouTube,” he says.

Duh.

The highlight reel posted last summer had nearly 1 million views before Emoni walked into the doors at Clague for the first time as an eighth-grader. Several other videos have racked up 500,000-plus views in less than one year.

By the spring of 2018, the suspense about where he plans to attend high school may be its own mini-drama. Then a few years later: Which college?

E.J. and Edith hardly need reminding that’s still a long way off. As good as the recruiting services have become at projecting stars, it’s easy to forget the object of all that attention is still just 13. At times, the recruiting experts simply miss.

“It’s always a crap shoot,” E.J. says. “You don’t know what life will deal you. You never know what can happen with injuries, the loss of motivation or pressure getting to be too much.”

Yet fans of two college basketball powers with the inside track can already start thinking about the fall of 2021, when Bates can officially sign a scholarship offer. In quiet moments, Emoni sometimes does, too.

Asked about his favorite programs, the soft-spoken kid doesn’t hesitate to name the early front-runners.

“Michigan State and Kentucky,” Emoni says.

___

Follow the series: https://www.apnews.com/tag/TheKid

___

Follow Larry Lage at http://twitter.com/larrylage

NCAA punishes Pacific men’s basketball for violations

AP Photo/Young Kwak
2 Comments

STOCKTON, Calif. (AP) — The men’s basketball team at Pacific has been punished by the NCAA for academic and recruiting violations under former coach Ron Verlin.

The NCAA said Wednesday that Verlin failed to promote an atmosphere of compliance when he violated academic misconduct and recruiting rules to get prospects eligible. He also failed to monitor his coaches and violated NCAA ethics rules when he encouraged others to give false information during the investigation.

The baseball program was also cited because former coach Ed Sprague impermissibly provided an athletic training student with a $16,000 scholarship to help with the housing costs of two baseball student-athletes, including her brother.

Penalties for the school include two years of probation, recruiting and scholarship reductions, a $5,000 fine and a vacation of all games in which ineligible athletes participated.