Determining the coach of the year depends on how you interpret the award

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Normally, I couldn’t care less about any national coach of the year award.

It’s an honor that usually goes to the guy whose team overachieved, and that team is usually fairly easy to identify.

Last season San Diego State’s Steve Fischer took home the Naismith version of the award. To approach it like a TV producer pitching a show to a major executive, the Aztecs were the “little guy that competed with the big guy and were led by another guy who found happiness coaching the little guy after a scandal marred his years coaching the big guy.”

The knock on all this, however, is that the Aztecs were sort of supposed to be good last season.

This season they weren’t, but somehow find themselves in the top 25 once again.  If anything, 2011-2012 is Fischer’s best coaching campaign, but too many stronger candidates push him down the list of nominations.

Not only are there an inordinately high number of valid candidates, together they provide us with a variety of reasons why they should be part of the discussion  The winner will likely be the coach whose story prevailed as the most interesting among voters.

So who are they?

To start, we must look at the work being done by Missouri’s Frank Haith.

Remember back in April when his hiring was lambasted by Tiger fans and alumni?

“This would be like if someone hired Quin Synder away from us,” the quasi-famous quote goes.

Today, Haith leads the nation’s most exciting team; enjoying a level of success that is exceeding expectations and erasing the name “Mike Anderson” from the minds of Tiger fans. For voters, he can play the angle that things were so bad at Miami that even the greatest of coaching minds couldn’t propel that program to the top.

Haith deserves some votes. He could get my vote if I had one, but maybe all this newfound success is really nothing more than being placed in a good situation. Remember, Haith didn’t recruit Ricardo Ratliffe, or the team’s prolific backcourt. He isn’t responsible for his team’s cohesion, either.  He really may have only implemented a system that suits the personnel better than what his predecessor had in place.

That in itself is laudable, yes, but just how responsible is he for the 2011-2012 Missouri Tigers?

Is it enough to warrant hardware?

Moving north, we have to consider a pair of Big East coaches.

First, you have Mike Brey.

Unquestionably, the reigning AP Coach of the Year has spearheaded one of the most impressive efforts to get to the top third in the standings of a major college basketball conference in recent memory.

This fall, Brey had to crowdsurf just to get fans into the Joyce Center. Then he lost his star guard Tim Abromaitis and was left with a bevy of role players and not a lot of scoring. So Brey decided to slow the game down, and was able to position his players on the court where they could still score.

Now, the Irish are a tournament lock, boasting wins against Syracuse, Marquette and Louisville even though the roster is made up of players who may not even be talented enough to play overseas upon graduation.

Where the argument for Brey breaks down is based on what lies ahead.  Most COY recipients (Brey, ironically being the most recent exception to the rule) play at least into the second weekend of the tournament.

The Irish may not get that far, thus making it unlikely for Brey to repeat as AP Coach of the year.

Jim Boeheim, however, will coach deep in to the tournament, and marching to a 20-0 start on the heels of the firing of a long-time assistant coach is an excellent anecdote for his application.

Whether or not the Bernie Fine sexual abuse allegations really served as a distraction is undetermined, but Boeheim’s body of work goes far beyond overcoming that scandal.

The real argument for Boeheim, which has turned into a joke, is that the Orange don’t have one go-to guy. Regardless about how you project their tournament hopes based on this trait, it should speak to the teamwork and selflessness this team possesses.  Guys like Kris Joseph, Brandon Triche and Dion Waiters could be all-league if there was less talent around them, and this culture was fostered entirely by the game’s third all-time winningest coach.

Boeheim is in a great position to win either of the national coach of the year awards because he took a good pre-season team and made them great, and the award should be his if the Orange finish the regular season with only one conference loss.

Deviating from name brand coaches, no coach of the year discussion would be complete without a nod to the unknown coach that’s exceeding expectations at a mid-major school. So where does Murray State’s Steve Prohm fit?

Undefeated until last week, Prom’s Racers fell from everybody’s favorite team that was sure to get underseeded by the committee to being flung onto the bubble by skeptics.

After 13 years as a Division I assistant, including five at Murray State, Prohm is in position to pull a Keno Davis by taking a true mid-major to the Sweet 16, earn COY honors, then bolt for a BCS program with a bigger budget.

Who knows what the fate of the Racers will be this season. Despite maintaining an unblemished record through early February, it was clear this team wasn’t playing that well leading up to their first loss.

They could lose another Ohio Valley game, or to Saint Mary’s on Saturday, or even during Championship Week. Whatever the case, Prohm’s situation places him squarely on the bubble for this award and one more loss eliminates him from contention.

So all this, and we’re left with the most polarizing character in all of college basketball: John Calipari.

Part of me thinks that Cal is currently trending up as the choice around the country, but that might just be because Big Blue Nation is the loudest fan base in the nation.

But Kentucky is a Christian Watford buzzer-beating three-pointer shy of playing for an undefeated regular season late into Feburary, and that’s historic.

Contrary to what the haters say, Calipari’s methodology of selling elite high school players on his one-and-done program, and working them for six months before sending them to the NBA is not easy. Each fall Cal is tasked with melding egos and accelerating the maturation of teenagers. He has to quickly learn what motivational tactics will work and which will mentally fatigue a player. What drives DeMarcus Cousins may not resonate with Marquis Teague, and Calipari doesn’t have a lot of time to figure that out.

Over the past two seasons, the learning curve has become less steep, and Calipari seems to be getting the hang of optimizing his program. He’s become more methodical, and a better coach this season based on what he went through in years one and two at Kentucky.

If you can appreciate that body of work, and if Kentucky remains a National Championship favorite entering mid-March, he may leapfrog all the aforementioned coaches for the award.

So who is the coach of the year? Well, that all depends on how you interpret the distinction.

Nick Fasulo is the manager of Searching for Billy Edelin. Follow him on Twitter @billyedelinSBN.

Sweet 16 betting lines, point spreads, over-unders

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Here is the full TV schedule, with spreads, over-unders and betting lines, for every game for final day of the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament.

Odds via



  • 7:07 p.m.: No. 11 Loyola-Chicago vs. No. 7 Nevada (-2.5), CBS (143.5)
  • 9:37 p.m.: No. 9 Kansas State vs. No. 5 Kentucky (-5.5), CBS (138.5)


  • 7:37 p.m.: No. 7 Texas A&M vs. No. 3 Michigan (-3), TBS (134)
  • 10:07 p.m.: No. 9 Florida State vs. No. 4 Gonzaga (-5.5), TBS (154.5)



  • 7:07 p.m.: No. 5 Clemson vs. No. 1 Kansas (-4), CBS (143)
  • 9:37: No. 11 Syracuse vs. No. 2 Duke (-11.5), CBS (133.5)


  • 7:27 p.m.: No. 5 West Virginia vs. No. 1 Villanova, TBS
  • 9:57 p.m.: No. 3 Texas Tech vs. No. 2 Purdue (-1.5), TBS (137.5)

The 2018 NCAA tournament bracket looks wide open after a wild opening weekend

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The wild opening weekend of the 2018 NCAA tournament is finally in the books.

The bracket officially turns its attention to the Sweet 16 and Elite Eight this week as teams are trying to punch tickets to San Antonio during an especially wide-open year.

Major upsets, double-digit seeds advancing into the Sweet 16 and the loss of all four top seeds in the South Regional means there’s still plenty of action to watch over the next several weeks.

Here’s how the updated bracket looks after the first weekend of March Madness.

Sunday’s NCAA Tournament Recap: Four top three seeds fall

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Caleb Martin was, once again, a monster for Nevada on Sunday.

He finished with 25 points. He handed out seven assists. He put the No. 7-seed Wolf Pack on his back and carried them back from a 22-point deficit in the final 12 minutes of a game that looked like it was lost.

It was impressive.

But he’s not our player of the day. His teammate Josh Hall is. Because he’s the one that grabbed this offensive rebound and scored this put back and sent Nevada into the second weekend of the NCAA tournament.

That lead was Nevada’s first lead of the game.


  • JEVON CARTER, West Virginia: 28 points. Five steals. Five assists. Four boards. Eight turnovers for Marshall’s Jon Elmore. Jevon Carter was terrific this weekend.
  • T.J. STARKS, Texas A&M: While Tyler Davis and Big Bob Williams combined for 26 points and 22 boards, it was Starks that was the star for the Aggies on Sunday, finishing with 21 points and five assists in a blowout win over UNC.


No. 9-seed Florida State erased a 12-point deficit in the final 10 minutes to send No. 1-seed Xavier back to the Queen City. Both Xavier and Cincinnati blew late leads on Sunday.

It was not a pretty game, but No. 11-seed Syracuse knocked off No. 3-seed Michigan State in a game where the Spartans completely forgot how to make a jump shot.


Playing without their starting center, who is recovering from a broken elbow, Purdue’s Dakota Mathias buried this shot to send in-state rival Butler home:


Michigan State shot 8-for-38 from three on Sunday afternoon, which was the major reason that the Spartans found a way to lose to Syracuse in the second round.

But one of the eight threes that they did hit was this one:


Auburn never stood a chance. No. 5-seed Clemson led by 41 points at one points as they sent Bruce Pearl’s boys packing.

The dream died. No. 16 UMBC lost to No. 9 Kansas State, ending their “run” in the NCAA tournament at two games.

VIDEO: Roy Williams reflects on recent run: ‘Those kids on the court were my salvation’

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North Carolina head coach Roy Williams took a moment to reflect on a special three-year run after the Tar Heels were eliminated from the 2018 NCAA Tournament with a blowout loss to No. 7 seed Texas A&M on Sunday.

After back-to-back national title game appearances and a championship win last season, Williams grew quite fond of seniors like Joel Berry II and Theo Pinson. Williams also mentioned some of the tumultuous circumstances surrounding the program from the past few years as he maintained that his players helped him through a difficult stretch in his life.

Speaking to reporters at the postgame press conference, Williams tried to subdue the emotion in his voice as he talked about this Tar Heels team.

2018 NCAA Tournament: Sweet 16 betting odds and national title futures

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With four more top threes falling out of the NCAA tournament on Sunday, here are the updated national title futures and betting odds in the NCAA tournament.

Odds via

Villanova: 4/1
Duke: 6/1
Michigan: 8/1
Kentucky: 8/1
Kansas: 10/1
Gonzaga: 12/1
Purdue: 15/1
West Virginia: 22/1
Texas Tech: 25/1
Nevada: 100/1
Texas A&M: 100/1
Loyola Chicago: 100/1
Clemson: 125/1
Kansas State: 125/1
Syracuse: 125/1
Florida State: 150/1