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Determining the coach of the year depends on how you interpret the award

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Normally, I couldn’t care less about any national coach of the year award.

It’s an honor that usually goes to the guy whose team overachieved, and that team is usually fairly easy to identify.

Last season San Diego State’s Steve Fischer took home the Naismith version of the award. To approach it like a TV producer pitching a show to a major executive, the Aztecs were the “little guy that competed with the big guy and were led by another guy who found happiness coaching the little guy after a scandal marred his years coaching the big guy.”

The knock on all this, however, is that the Aztecs were sort of supposed to be good last season.

This season they weren’t, but somehow find themselves in the top 25 once again.  If anything, 2011-2012 is Fischer’s best coaching campaign, but too many stronger candidates push him down the list of nominations.

Not only are there an inordinately high number of valid candidates, together they provide us with a variety of reasons why they should be part of the discussion  The winner will likely be the coach whose story prevailed as the most interesting among voters.

So who are they?

To start, we must look at the work being done by Missouri’s Frank Haith.

Remember back in April when his hiring was lambasted by Tiger fans and alumni?

“This would be like if someone hired Quin Synder away from us,” the quasi-famous quote goes.

Today, Haith leads the nation’s most exciting team; enjoying a level of success that is exceeding expectations and erasing the name “Mike Anderson” from the minds of Tiger fans. For voters, he can play the angle that things were so bad at Miami that even the greatest of coaching minds couldn’t propel that program to the top.

Haith deserves some votes. He could get my vote if I had one, but maybe all this newfound success is really nothing more than being placed in a good situation. Remember, Haith didn’t recruit Ricardo Ratliffe, or the team’s prolific backcourt. He isn’t responsible for his team’s cohesion, either.  He really may have only implemented a system that suits the personnel better than what his predecessor had in place.

That in itself is laudable, yes, but just how responsible is he for the 2011-2012 Missouri Tigers?

Is it enough to warrant hardware?

Moving north, we have to consider a pair of Big East coaches.

First, you have Mike Brey.

Unquestionably, the reigning AP Coach of the Year has spearheaded one of the most impressive efforts to get to the top third in the standings of a major college basketball conference in recent memory.

This fall, Brey had to crowdsurf just to get fans into the Joyce Center. Then he lost his star guard Tim Abromaitis and was left with a bevy of role players and not a lot of scoring. So Brey decided to slow the game down, and was able to position his players on the court where they could still score.

Now, the Irish are a tournament lock, boasting wins against Syracuse, Marquette and Louisville even though the roster is made up of players who may not even be talented enough to play overseas upon graduation.

Where the argument for Brey breaks down is based on what lies ahead.  Most COY recipients (Brey, ironically being the most recent exception to the rule) play at least into the second weekend of the tournament.

The Irish may not get that far, thus making it unlikely for Brey to repeat as AP Coach of the year.

Jim Boeheim, however, will coach deep in to the tournament, and marching to a 20-0 start on the heels of the firing of a long-time assistant coach is an excellent anecdote for his application.

Whether or not the Bernie Fine sexual abuse allegations really served as a distraction is undetermined, but Boeheim’s body of work goes far beyond overcoming that scandal.

The real argument for Boeheim, which has turned into a joke, is that the Orange don’t have one go-to guy. Regardless about how you project their tournament hopes based on this trait, it should speak to the teamwork and selflessness this team possesses.  Guys like Kris Joseph, Brandon Triche and Dion Waiters could be all-league if there was less talent around them, and this culture was fostered entirely by the game’s third all-time winningest coach.

Boeheim is in a great position to win either of the national coach of the year awards because he took a good pre-season team and made them great, and the award should be his if the Orange finish the regular season with only one conference loss.

Deviating from name brand coaches, no coach of the year discussion would be complete without a nod to the unknown coach that’s exceeding expectations at a mid-major school. So where does Murray State’s Steve Prohm fit?

Undefeated until last week, Prom’s Racers fell from everybody’s favorite team that was sure to get underseeded by the committee to being flung onto the bubble by skeptics.

After 13 years as a Division I assistant, including five at Murray State, Prohm is in position to pull a Keno Davis by taking a true mid-major to the Sweet 16, earn COY honors, then bolt for a BCS program with a bigger budget.

Who knows what the fate of the Racers will be this season. Despite maintaining an unblemished record through early February, it was clear this team wasn’t playing that well leading up to their first loss.

They could lose another Ohio Valley game, or to Saint Mary’s on Saturday, or even during Championship Week. Whatever the case, Prohm’s situation places him squarely on the bubble for this award and one more loss eliminates him from contention.

So all this, and we’re left with the most polarizing character in all of college basketball: John Calipari.

Part of me thinks that Cal is currently trending up as the choice around the country, but that might just be because Big Blue Nation is the loudest fan base in the nation.

But Kentucky is a Christian Watford buzzer-beating three-pointer shy of playing for an undefeated regular season late into Feburary, and that’s historic.

Contrary to what the haters say, Calipari’s methodology of selling elite high school players on his one-and-done program, and working them for six months before sending them to the NBA is not easy. Each fall Cal is tasked with melding egos and accelerating the maturation of teenagers. He has to quickly learn what motivational tactics will work and which will mentally fatigue a player. What drives DeMarcus Cousins may not resonate with Marquis Teague, and Calipari doesn’t have a lot of time to figure that out.

Over the past two seasons, the learning curve has become less steep, and Calipari seems to be getting the hang of optimizing his program. He’s become more methodical, and a better coach this season based on what he went through in years one and two at Kentucky.

If you can appreciate that body of work, and if Kentucky remains a National Championship favorite entering mid-March, he may leapfrog all the aforementioned coaches for the award.

So who is the coach of the year? Well, that all depends on how you interpret the distinction.

Nick Fasulo is the manager of Searching for Billy Edelin. Follow him on Twitter @billyedelinSBN.

VIDEO: Arizona commit Terrance Ferguson throws down under-the-legs dunk after making 3-pointer

"CHARLOTTE, NC - JULY 9: Terrance Ferguson during the 2015 Under Armour All-America Basketball Camp on July 9, 2015 at Queens College in Charlotte, NC. (Photo by Ned Dishman/Under Armour)"
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Arizona commit Terrance Ferguson has been known as one of the best dunkers in the country for the last few years. So you knew the 6-foot-6 wing was going to attempt the latest internet dunk craze that’s been going around.

Some call it the, “5-point play” in which the dunker makes a 3-pointer and immediately sprints following the shot release to catch the make for an under-the-legs dunk.

It’s as tough as it sounds and Ferguson makes it look easy.

VIDEO: Manute Bol’s 6’11” son Bol Bol throws down in-game under-the-legs dunk

McPherson's Jacob Loecker attempts to steal the ball form Shawnee Mission-Bishop Miege's Bol Bol during the first quarter of the boys' Class 4A Division I state championship basketball game Saturday, March 12, 2016, in Salina, Kan. (Travis Morrise/The Hutchinson News via AP)
(Travis Morrise/The Hutchinson News via AP)
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Bol Bol is the son of former NBA center Manute Bol, and the younger Bol is earning quite a bit of attention himself as a five-star prospect in the Class of 2018.

The 6-foot-11 Bol showed off some of his freakish coordination and athleticism on Friday night, by ripping a steal and taking it coast-to-coast for an under-the-legs dunk in the middle of a game at the Jayhawk Invitational.

Bol will be one of the players to watch this spring as he plays with KC Run GMC.

Iowa State guard Naz Mitrou-Long gets hardship waiver to play additional year

Iowa State guard Nazareth Mitrou-Long defends Buffalo guard Jarryn Skeete during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Monday, Dec. 7, 2015, in Ames, Iowa. Iowa State won 84-63. (AP Photo/Justin Hayworth)
(AP Photo/Justin Hayworth)
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Iowa State got a boost to its roster for next season as senior guard Naz Mitrou-Long has been granted a hardship waiver by the Big 12 conference.

“Everything happens for a reason and although it hurt to not be able to play for a group of guys I loved last year, my body needed time to recover and that time off allowed me to feel the best I’ve felt since my freshman year,” Mitrou-Long said in the release. “I’m glad I’ll be able to play for the best fans in the country and represent the name on the front of my jersey, Iowa State, one more year. Words can’t describe this feeling. Cyclone Nation, be ready for a special year.”

The 6-foot-4 Long played in eight games last season for Iowa State as he averaged 12 points per game. He missed the rest of the season to deal with pain in his surgically repaired hips. Mitrou-Long has been a very effective three-point shooter during his career at Iowa State and he should be a nice option to have for next season if he’s healthy.

CIAA will stay in North Carolina despite state’s LGBT law

Protesters rally against House Bill 2 in Raleigh, N.C.,  Monday, April 25, 2016. While demonstrations circled North Carolina's statehouse on Monday, for and against a Republican-backed law curtailing protections for LGBT people and limiting public bathroom access for transgender people, House Democrats filed a repeal bill that stands little chance of passing. (Chuck Liddy/The News & Observer via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
(Chuck Liddy/The News & Observer via AP)
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association says it won’t move its headquarters, its basketball tournament or other conference championships from North Carolina, despite the state’s controversial new LGBT law.

The CIAA said in a statement Thursday that it will instead partner with the NCAA to educate its members on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues as it does on other issues, like graduation rates and concussion management.

The Charlotte Observer reports that the CIAA, the oldest African-American sports conference in the U.S., has hosted its annual basketball tournament in Charlotte since 2006 and announced it was moving its headquarters to Charlotte from Virginia in 2015.

The CIAA said Thursday that it will continue to “monitor the issues,” as it has since House Bill 2 passed.

 

VIDEOS: Stephen Curry personally invites athletes to his select camp

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry, left, holds the championship trophy and Andre Iguodala holds the series MVP trophy as they celebrate winning the NBA Finals against the Cleveland Cavaliers in Cleveland, Wednesday, June 17, 2015. The Warriors defeated the Cavaliers 105-97 to win the best-of-seven game series 4-2. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
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As he did last year, the NBA’s MVP is sending out personal invites to Under Armour’s SC30 Select Camp for some of the best high school and college point guards in the country.

It’s a pretty cool thing for the kids. Can you imagine how you would feel as a high school junior getting a personalized invitation to a camp from Stephen Curry himself?