The official Unofficial Rules of Storming the Court


source: AP

Following Missouri’s come from behind victory against Kansas Saturday night, one of the most indelible images was of a pair of Tiger players giving students the universal sign for “Do Not Pass Go”.

They weren’t telling them to stop celebrating, but rather encourage them not to storm the court.

Because as exhilarating as that may be, it would behoove Mizzou players and fans from getting too excited about defeating Kansas, their hated rival. Losing to a team that appears to believe they were going to win stings a bit more than losing to a team that can’t control themselves after securing a big “W”.

Even though their head was in the right place, I’m still a bit reluctant to praise Denmon’s and English’s work in halting the court storm. In the end, the onus falls on the students to have enough education on when and when not to rush.

Just as players must be aware of time and score, undergrads must be cognizant of context.

Now I know there have been plenty of attempts at etching the rules of court storming in stone. There’s even a few excellent blogs whose namesake is of the time-honored tradition. But perhaps we can get a bit more scientific with such an important document, provide detail where there once was gray area, and let an unofficial article of bylaws live as long as the Internet.

Here are our defined rules for Storming a College Basketball Court, a special act that needs order to preserve its sanctity.


I. You cannot storm the court if you are Duke, Kansas, Kentucky or North Carolina. These four pillars of college basketball are the four winningest programs in the history Division I, and the only programs with a winning percentage of .700 or higher with at least 1500 Division I victories. This rule will remain firmly in place until a program’s all-time winning percentage falls below .650. Congratulations, you have renounced the right to court storm.

II. You can storm the court if you defeat your opponent on a buzzer-beating half-court shot, and the opponent is nationally ranked. Your current standing in the pecking order is irrelevant in this situation.

III. You cannot storm the court if both you and your opponent are not nationally ranked. A provision applies to the Ivy League, which can allow a court storming if the winning team clinches a trip to the NCAA Tournament on their home court, and they have not won the league in five or more years or the game ends on a buzzer beater.

IV. You can storm the court if you defeat your primary rival in any of the following ways:

1.  A buzzer beating shot against your primary rival when said rival is ranked ahead of you. If neither team is ranked, see rule III.

2.  By any margin and your primary rival is:

  • Ranked #1 in the country.
  • Ranked 15 or more spots ahead of you, assuming both teams are nationally ranked.
  • Relinquishes a 15 point lead in the final 15 minutes of play.
  • Relinquishes a 20 point lead at any point in the game.

V. You cannot storm the court if you are a non-BCS school that defeats a BCS school with a .500 or below winning percentage at any point in the season.

VI. You can storm the court if you are a non-BCS school that is not nationally ranked, and defeat a BCS school that is nationally ranked in the top 15 or a non-BCS school ranked in the top 10.

VII. You cannot storm the court if you began the season ranked in the top 15, fall out of the top 25 and then defeat a ranked team.

VIII. You can storm the court if you defeat an undefeated team by any margin, and that undefeated team has completed at least 50 percent of their schedule and is ranked ahead of you.

IX. You cannot storm the court if you boast an all-time winning percentage of more than .500 against your opponent and have faced that team at least once a season for the past 15 years.

X. You can storm the court if you are drunk, and/or if the co-ed standing next to you in the student section convinces you to storm the court under the assumption that you and said co-ed will sleep in the same bed together following the game. It would only make sense.

Nick Fasulo is the manager of Searching for Billy Edelin. He has never successfully stormed a court. Follow him on Twitter @billyedelinSBN.

Pressure is on new coach Steve Prohm at Iowa State

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AMES, Iowa (AP) Five months ago, Iowa State’s Steve Prohm was the coach at mid-major Murray State. Now he’s in charge of one of the big favorites in the Big 12.

Prohm officially began his first season in charge of the Cyclones on Tuesday with the team’s annual media day.

Iowa State has all the pieces to make a run at the league title and more – provided that Prohm can handle coaching college basketball at the highest level, of course.

In the minds of Prohm’s players, the Cyclones have nothing to worry about.

“Coach (Prohm) is in here earning our trust and our respect every day,” said senior forward Georges Niang. “Even though he’s not trying to cross any of our toes, he puts his foot down when he needs to and lets us know that stuff needs to get done. I think he has a great combination of how to keep us motivated…and still be stern and be able to get the most out of us.”

Fred Hoiberg’s departure for the Chicago Bulls after five mostly successful seasons gave Prohm a shot at a national title. The roster Hoiberg left behind for Prohm is loaded.

Niang, a likely preseason first-team All-American, second-team All-Big 12 point guard Monte Morris and league defensive player of the year Jameel McKay headline one of the nation’s most talented starting units. Throw in veterans like Naz Long, Matt Thomas, Abdel Nader and transfer Deonte Burton, and Prohm might just have the best roster a new Power Five coach has inherited since Bill Guthridge took over for Dean Smith at North Carolina in 1997.

Guthridge reached the Final Four with his first team.

Prohm isn’t shying away from the notion that Iowa State is among the handful of teams with serious national title aspirations.

“Yeah, they’re realistic,” Prohm said when asked about the sky-high expectations for this year’s team. “I think we have the opportunity to have a very special season.”

The similarities between what type of styles Prohm and Hoiberg use was cited as a big reason why Iowa State hired him. Hoiberg even lobbied for Prohm to athletic director Jamie Pollard during the hiring process.

To that end, Prohm is going to let his players have a ton of input on how they play. Prohm doesn’t plan many changes, just tweaks that mostly involve techniques to improve Iowa State’s somewhat inconsistent rebounding and defense.

“I don’t need to say, `This is the way we’re doing things guys because this is the way I did it.’ That’s stupid,” Prohm said. “I need to meet these guys halfway.”

Prohm also acknowledged that he’ll be doing quite a bit of learning himself this season. But Prohm said he intends to embrace the unique opportunity he’s been afforded.

“This is a great situation to walk into. No question,” Prohm said. “Is there pressure? Yeah. But who wants a job with no pressure?”

Lawyer: Pierre suspended due to ‘unfair and defective process’

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Dayton forward Dyshawn Pierre, who is suspended from school for the fall semester stemming from a sexual assault allegation, has sued the university over what his lawyer calls an “unfair and defective internal process”.

Peter R. Ginsberg, Pierre’s lawyer, released a statement to NBCSports.com on Wednesday stating that his client intends to file suit over the ruling, saying that the school arrived at a suspension through “fundamentally unfair and defective internal process that deprived him of vital rights and protections and has resulted in a disruption in his education, a drastic blow to his reputation, and a potentially fatal interference” with basketball.

Pierre was suspended due to an incident that allegedly took place in mid-April and was reported in May, according to the Dayton Daily News. The prosecutor declined to press charges in the case due to a lack of evidence, the paper reported.

Pierre, a 6-foot-6 wing that averaged 12.7 points last season, is not currently enrolled at the school.

“What has been done to me has been grossly unfair. The allegations against me are false,” he said. “And now I find myself with my reputation tarnished, my schooling interrupted and my dream of helping the basketball team win a national championship being threatened. I want justice, and I want a return to my normal life.”

Ginsberg represented Dez Wells in a similar case. Wells, then at Xavier, was expelled by the university in 2012 following a sexual assault allegation, but he won a settlement from the school in 2014. The crux of Ginsberg’s claims regarding Pierre’s case is that the process by which Dayton reached this conclusion is fundamentally flawed.