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Who knew it was possible for a team to outgun Missouri?

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It just one of those nights for No. 2 Missouri.

The Tigers – fresh off a win at Baylor and at their highest in the AP poll since 1989-90 – simply couldn’t contain a hot-shooting team Wednesday night, losing 79-72 at Oklahoma State. Usually that’s what happens to the Tigers’ foes.

Mizzou entered the game with the nation’s most efficient offense, small-ball (it starts three guards and uses 6-6 wing Kim English as a power forward) that blends uncanny shooting (39.3 percent from deep; an eFG% of 58.1) and ball-handling (only three teams take better care of the ball), not to mention a defense with more than a few remnants of Mike Anderson’s tenure still evident in their number of steals.

The Tigers didn’t deviate from their usual style Wednesday; it just didn’t have the same result.

Mizzou (18-2) couldn’t hit from outside (4 of 19), but didn’t attempt any more 3s than normal. It committed 10 turnovers on about 70 possessions, which is standard for them. The Cowboys lost about one in every five possessions, also at Mizzou’s average.

The biggest difference, by far, was how the Cowboys shot. They hit 59.6 percent from the field, which is so far from ordinary for them, it’s shocking. Coach Frank Haith said his team lacked focus to win on the road, which means the players probably overlooked the Cowboys (10-10, 3-4 in the Big 12).

“I expected it to be a hard-fought game,” Haith said. “This is Big 12 basketball. There’s good players. We didn’t do what we needed to do to finish the game out once we got control of the game.”

That would be due to freshmen Brian Williams (22 points) and LeBryan Nash (27). Nash scored 13 points, mostly on 3s, during a 17-4 Oklahoma State run that carried the Cowboys down the stretch. Hard to contain a guy who gets hot. Ask Ohio State.

Also, this tends to excite the home team.

It’d be easy to write off Missouri as a team too dependent on 3s and too small to be a serious contender in March. But if as we’ve seen this season, this was the type of game that happens to Top 10 teams, no matter how experienced or talented they are. The Tigers could just as easily be the team on the other side, hitting shot after shot and gunning 3s.

They’ll keep gunning and keep beating teams. But these nights will happen, making the Tigers the ultimate hit-or-miss pick in March. I’d be willing to take my chances with Marcus Denmon & Co., though. They haven’t given me much reason to doubt them yet.

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UNLV’s Stephen Zimmerman out with a knee injury

UNLV forward Stephen Zimmerman Jr. shoots against San Diego State during an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016, in Las Vegas. (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
(L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
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The injury Stephen Zimmerman suffered on Saturday will keep the star UNLV freshman out for at least a week, a source told NBC Sports.

The injury is not thought to be serious, however. Zimmerman may be kept out for longer as a precaution, but that’s a result of the Runnin’ Rebels being in a situation where the rest of their regular season is relatively meaningless.

They’re not getting an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament regardless of how they finish out league play. With back-up center Ben Carter out with a torn ACL, it’s more important to make sure that Zimmerman, who is averaging 10.6 points and 9.1 boards this season, is totally healthy for the Mountain West tournament.

That tournament, mind you, will be played at UNLV’s Thomas & Mack Center.

So the Runnin’ Rebels, regardless of how poor they’ve played this season, will always have a chance to land an automatic bid.

Anyway, the more interesting aspect of this story is how Zimmerman injured the knee. It was a completely avoidable play that came after the whistle, but I’m not sure it was what you would call a “dirty play”. You tell me:

VIDEO: Buddy Hield is ‘all money’ on game-winning three vs. No. 24 Texas

Oklahoma guard Buddy Hield (24) takes a shot over Oklahoma State forward Chris Oliver during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Stillwater, Okla., Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Brody Schmidt)
(AP Photo/Brody Schmidt)
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With a little more than three minutes left on Monday night, No. 24 Texas held a 57-51 lead on No. 3 Oklahoma in Norman as Jordan Woodard struggled again and Buddy Hield failed to find the rhythm that he had throughout the first three months of the season.

At that point in the game, Hield was 4-for-14 from the floor with 15 points and four turnovers. He had just missed a pair of wide-open threes

“I couldn’t make a shot,” Hield said after the game. But that changed down the stretch. First, Hield finally got a three to drop. On the next possession, he got all the way to the rim and scored. On the following two possessions, he was fouled on a drive to the rim and hit four free throws. And after missing a pull-up jumper, Hield did this:

“I told coach I wanted the ball,” Hield said, “I saw Lammert coming to bite, so I pulled up.”

“It’s all money.”

Hield is already the favorite to win National Player of the Year, and this performance is only going to help his cause further. Think about it like this: Buddy was not good on Monday night, at least according to his (admittedly lofty) standards. But he still finished with 27 points and shook off a cold shooting night just in time to take over down the stretch.

Now think about this: Hield’s head coach has enough confidence in him to hand him the keys in the final minutes despite the fact that he’s struggling and on a team that has two other players that Lon Kruger trusts on game-winning possessions. Think about it. When Oklahoma beat West Virginia at the buzzer, it was Jordan Woodard that the play was drawn up for. When they beat LSU, it was Isaiah Cousins that got the rock on the final possession while Hield was used as a decoy. .

Want to talk about coaching luxuries?

Kruger has three guards that can shoot, penetrate and score, and penetrate and kick, and one of them is the National Player of the Year that doesn’t mind being used as a decoy.