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Georgetown’s win over Louisville showcases Big East’s balance up top

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Prior to Wednesday night’s game against Georgetown at the KFC Yum! Center, there were plenty of people that believed Louisville was ranked too high at fourth in the country.

Those folks are unlikely to change their opinion on the matter after the Hoyas left the Commonwealth with a 71-68 win, handing the Cardinals their first loss of the season.

And frankly, they wouldn’t be wrong. Louisville isn’t one of the top four teams in the country. They may not even belong in the top ten. Their was ranking was more the result of high preseason expectations, a myriad of close wins against solid teams and the fact that the a handful of teams that should be ranked above them have lost already this season. Is Louisville a better team than North Carolina? Probably not, but since the Tar Heels fell against Kentucky and UNLV already this season, pollsters slid the Cardinals all the way up to fourth.

Don’t punish the Cardinals for the quirky early season ranking process.

Instead, you should credit Georgetown for their performance on Wednesday.

Louisville is not a great offensive basketball team, and they certainly didn’t play a great offensive basketball game Wednesday. Where they are going to win games is on the defensive end of the floor, by using their ability to pressure ball-handlers and force turnovers to keep their opponent from doing what they want to do offensively. Against the Hoyas, Louisville did exactly that.

Georgetown may not have any all-americans on their roster this season, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t, once again, a Big Three on this team. Henry Sims, Hollis Thompson and Jason Clark are the three guys that John Thompson III relies on the most to make plays in the framework of their offense, to knock down big shots and to carry the bulk of the offensive load. But against Louisville, those three struggled.

Gorgui Dieng’s length bothered Sims, Clark couldn’t find any openings offensively and Thompson saved his stat line with a couple of late jumpers. All told, Georgetown’s Big Three went 8-26 from the floor, turned the ball over eight times and scored a whopping 24 points, which is about 15 points below their season average. That is precisely the kind of defense performance Rick Pitino wanted on those three players.

With their stars struggling, Georgetown’s role players provided their best basketball of the season.

Markel Starks finished with 20 points on 7-8 shooting. Otto Porter added 14 points and 14 boards. Jabril Trawick scored nine points in the first half to keep Georgetown from getting run out of the gym by Louisville.

You don’t gameplan for those three. Sure, their names and tendencies are gone over in the scouting report, but no one is going to structure their defense to figure out a way to slow down Starks or to find an answer to Porter. In fact, I’d be willing to bet that most of the teams Georgetown will face this season will head into their matchup thinking that they’ll let Starks, Porter and Trawick try to beat them.

On this night, they did. And when that happens, all you can really do is tip your cap to your opponent: “They got us tonight.”

We are going to run into a lot of that in the Big East this season.

Syracuse is really the only team in this league that stands a cut above everyone else. Once you get past the Orange, there is much more good than there is great. UConn has been inconsistent and unable to put away lesser competition. Marquette lost to LSU. Cincinnati has gotten better while losing their starting front court. West Virginia is young but has two senior stars. Hell, even Pitt and Villanova still have enough talent and coaching acumen in their program to turn around uninspiring starts.

Throw Georgetown and Louisville into the mix, and you have eight teams that are sitting in a jumbled mess a notch below the Orange whose tangible differences will, in all likelihood, depend on which players are playing well at a given point in the season. And while its pretty easy to identify who is sitting at the upper (UConn) and lower (Villanova) ends of that spectrum, at the end of the day the Big East is, once again, a league defined more by mediocrity than it is grandeur.

In other words, I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Big East sends all nine of the teams I mentioned to the NCAA Tournament.

But I also wouldn’t be surprised if everyone other than Syracuse was back at home by the time the second weekend tips off.

What We Learned

Georgetown:

– The youngsters on this team can play. Markel Starks has knocked down jumpers all year long and had a couple of promising games against lesser competition, but this performance puts a stamp on the improvement he has made as a sophomore. Otto Porter has the talent to provide many more double-doubles this season. Jabril Trawick might be Georgetown’s best playmaker off the dribble. Most importantly? The Hoyas won at Louisville on a night when their big three stunk. That’s a good sign.

– I think that Georgetown has turned a corner this year. In the past few seasons, the Hoyas have been notorious for fast starts and slow finishes, both in a single games and over the course of an entire season. This year, however, the Hoyas won a double-overtime game against Memphis in Maui and followed that up by handing the Tigers a beatdown in DC a month later. They won on the road against Alabama despite blowing a late double-digit lead. And now, they won against Louisville on the road despite allowing the Cardinals to score 11 straight in the final four minutes to tie the game at 63. Throw in the fact that Georgetown was able to keep the game close even after Louisville opened up a double digit lead in the first ten minutes of the game, and I think we can say Georgetown has finally found some resiliency.

– Is that resiliency a result of the brawl that the Hoyas were in in China over the summer? That would make sense.

– Since I wrote this about Henry Sims he is 5-20 from the floor and averaging just 9.5 ppg and 6.0 rpg in two games.

Louisville:

– Not that we didn’t already know this, but the Cardinals will never be out of a game. They are the most spurtable team in the country. Because of the way they play — chucking up threes, pressing and trying to force turnovers — any success they have on either end of the floor builds up their momentum that much quicker. When they hit a three, they can get into their press. When they force a turnover in their press, they get a good look at a three. And when they hit a couple threes in a row and start forcing some turnovers, their confidence and enthusiasm sky rockets. Against Georgetown, Louisville erased an 11 point deficit with four minutes left in the game and had the game tied at the two minute mark.

– The Cardinals need to make better decisions down the stretch. Poor shot selection from Russ Smith, Kyle Kuric and Peyton Siva on the final threes possessions or Louisville cost them this game.

– I’m still not convinced this team is healthy. Getting Buckles and Swopshire back to 100% will create a nice compliment to Chane Behanan at the four and getting Wayne Blackshear will give Pitino another weapon on the perimeter.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @ballinisahabit.

Atlantic Sun Conference Preview: North Florida, Florida Gulf Coast lead a wide-open league

GAINESVILLE, FL - NOVEMBER 8:  Guard Dallas Moore #14 of the North Florida Ospreys directs play against theFlorida Gators  November 8, 2013 at the Stephen C. O'Connell Center in Gainesville, Florida. (Photo by Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images)
Photo by Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images)
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Beginning in September and running up through November 11th, the first day of the regular season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2016-2017 NBCSports.com college hoops preview package.

Today, we are previewing the Atlantic Sun conference.

The Atlantic Sun has experienced a surprising amount of tournament success recently as Florida Gulf Coast set the standard with its Sweet 16 appearance and famous “Dunk City” nickname in 2013 and Mercer followed that up with a win over Duke in the opening round in 2014.

The trend of solid tourney performances for the league continued last season when A-Sun tournament champion Florida Gulf Coast trailed eventual national runner-up North Carolina by only a point at halftime in a 1-16 game until the Tar Heels pulled away and won by 16 in the second half.

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This season, the league is hoping to be another tough out in the tournament as they’re led by the last two teams to make the NCAA tournament from the conference in North Florida and Florida Gulf Coast, and the rest of the league appears to be completely wide open.

After winning the regular season title last season, North Florida returns Atlantic Sun Player of the Year and senior point guard Dallas Moore as he’s clearly the top candidate to repeat his awards from last season. Moore is joined by talented forward Chris Davenport and 6-foot-11 senior Romelo Ranks returns from injury to anchor the post.

Florida Gulf Coast beat North Florida by 33 in the conference tournament and ended up back in the Big Dance as they return productive senior forward Marc-Eddy Norelia. The Eagles return four starters total as Antravious Simmons, Zach Johnson and Christian Terrell are all back and a few talented transfers makes this roster an intriguing one.

From there, the Atlantic Sun appears completely wide open with a lot of unpredictable rosters. Jacksonville was gutted by injuries last season and still managed to contend for the league’s regular-season title. The Dolphins return three starters and three more players from injury, including Darius Dawkins, who led the nation in made three-pointers before his season-ending injury.

NJIT had an admirable showing in their inaugural season in the Atlantic Sun, finishing 8-6 in league play. High-scoring senior guard Damon Lynn returns to lead while he’s flanked by two other returning starters. Tim Coleman is another returning double-figure scorer as the Highlanders have the talent to win the league.

Lipscomb lost high-scoring guard J.C. Hampton to Texas A&M as a graduate transfer but they get a transfer of their own in Western Kentucky center Rob Marberry. Former all-conference guard Josh Williams also returns from a season-ending injury as the Bisons are hoping to improve on consecutive .500 conference marks.

Stetson has some interesting pieces despite coming off a 4-10 league campaign. Forward Derick Newton was the Atlantic Sun Freshman of the Year last season and the Hatters return their top seven scorers and four starters. Kennesaw State brings back leading scorer Kendrick Ray but they have to replace 18 points a game from Yonel Brown. Al Skinner’s ballclub returns two more starters and productive bench scorer Aubrey Williams. Bringing up the rear is USC Upstate as they return all five starters and could just as easily finish in the league’s top half. Deion Holmes and 7-footer Michael Buchanan are returning double-figure scorers for the Spartans.

MORE: 2016-17 Season Preview Coverage | Conference Previews | Preview Schedule

PRESEASON ATLANTIC SUN PLAYER OF THE YEAR: Dallas Moore, North Florida

The easy choice for this award since Moore won Atlantic Sun Player of the Year honors last season. The 6-foot-1 point guard led the Atlantic Sun in points (19.7 ppg) and assists (6.0 apg) last season while also shooting 51 percent from the field and 39 percent from three-point range. After withdrawing his name from the 2016 NBA Draft after testing the waters, Moore is hoping that another big season gives him a chance at making The League.

THE REST OF THE PRESEASON ATLANTIC SUN TEAM:

  • Damon Lynn, NJIT: The 5-foot-11 senior was an all-league selection last season as he’s averaged at least 17.0 points per game all three years of college.
  • Kendrick Ray, Kennesaw State: The 6-foot-1 senior put up 18.7 points per game last season as those numbers could go up with the departure of Yonel Brown.
  • Chris Davenport, North Florida: Versatile senior 6-foot-8 forward was fourth in the league in rebounding, second in blocks and shot 37 percent on three-pointers last season.
  • Marc Eddy Norelia, Florida Gulf Coast: Dominant at times in the conference tournament last season, the 6-foot-8 senior averaged 17.1 points and 9.3 rebounds per game for the 2015-16 campaign.

ONE TWITTER FEED TO FOLLOW: @ASUNMBB

PREDICTED FINISH

  1. North Florida
  2. Florida Gulf Coast
  3. Jacksonville
  4. NJIT
  5. Lipscomb
  6. Stetson
  7. Kennesaw State
  8. USC Upstate

Richmond promoted on Mullin’s staff

SPRINGFIELD, MA - AUGUST 8: Mitch Richmond, inductee, speaks with presenter Chris Mullin by his side speaks during the 2014 Basketball Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony at Symphony Hall on August 8, 2014 in Springfield, Massachusetts. (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK (AP) Mitch Richmond has been promoted on the staff of fellow Naismith Hall of Famer Chris Mullin at St. John’s.

Richmond’s move from special assistant to assistant coach Thursday comes just before the start of Mullin’s second season at his alma mater. Richmond, a five-time All-NBA selection, played three seasons alongside Mullin with Golden State and won a title with the Los Angeles Lakers in 2002.

The Red Storm promoted former graduate assistant Luca Virgilio to assistant to the head coach and Chris Huey has joined the St. John’s staff as a graduate assistant.

Richmond replaces Barry Rohrssen who the school announced was no longer with the program on Sept. 7. Rohrssen, considered one of the top recruiters in college basketball, was with the program for one season.

Arizona State four-star freshman ruled academic redshirt

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A late addition to the Arizona State will have to wait to make his debut until the fall of 2017.

On Thursday, it was reported that Romello White, a four-star power forward, will sit out the 2016-17 season as an academic redshirt after failing to meet NCAA requirements, according to Doug Haller of azcentral.com.

White, ranked as the No. 87 overall player in the Class of 2016, had previously verbally committed to Tennessee and had signed with Georgia Tech before becoming a Sun Devil in mid-May after the Yellow Jackets had parted ways with Brian Gregory.

“Just having (White) in the program, as disappointing as this feels, his upside and future here are very strong,” Hurley told azcentral sports. “We’re going to have to be a little different (without him), a little unique. With this news, we’re going to be obviously driven through our guard play.”

White was set to be one of several freshmen to see immediate time on an inexperienced frontline. The Sun Devils had graduated Willie Atwood and had lost Savon Goodman to transfer. The 6-foot-8 White, along with fellow newcomer Jethro Tshisumpa, was expected to help the team’s top returning rebounder Obinna Oleka.

This news puts even more of an emphasis on the backcourt, one that returns leading scorer Tra Holder and adds Shannon Evans, a double-digit scorer for Hurley at Buffalo, who sat out this past year due to NCAA transfer rules.

Arizona State began the Bobby Hurley era with a 15-17 (5-13) record. The Sun Devils begin the 2016-17 campaign on Nov. 11 against Portland State.

Virginia basketball joins kneeling protest

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On the latest CBT Podcast, Rob Dauster, Scott Phillips and Travis Hines, wonder whether a college basketball player will kneel for the national anthem, a nationwide protest — from the professional level to the high school level — that was sparked by San Francisco 49ers backup quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Those questions were quickly answered on Thursday night, as Virginia freshman guard Ty Jerome tweeted out the above picture of the entire Cavalier team kneeling at halfcourt with a caption, “Kneel for injustice. Kneel for inequality.”

It’s hard to imagine this protest, which began during the NFL Preseason when Kaepernick was photographed sitting during the national anthem, simmers by the time the college basketball season starts. For starters, it’s still very much apart of the daily sports and political conversation in this country. You also have to imagine that next month, when the NBA season starts, several players will join in on the protest.

This time last year, a video — counter to this current protest — went viral. It was of Virginia Tech head coach Buzz Williams teaching his players, only 150 miles away from where Virginia’s protest picture was taken, the importance of the national anthem.

It remains to be seen if Virginia — or any other college basketball player/team — kneels for the national anthem during games this season, but one thing is clear: this protest will continue.

CBT Podcast: We talk players kneeling for anthem; Coaches as debate moderators

West Virginia head coach Bob Huggins questions a call during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against TCU in the quarterfinals of the Big 12 conference tournament in Kansas City, Mo., Thursday, March 10, 2016. } West Virginia defeated TCU 86-66. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
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On the latest CBT Podcast, the guys discuss the new head coach at George Washington, a search that was completed several weeks after firing Mike Lonergan. The group also wonders if any college basketball player follows Colin Kaepernick’s lead and kneels for the national anthem.

Given this week’s first presidential debate, Rob Dauster, Scott Phillips and Travis Hines, each choose a college coach they want to see moderate the next debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

(Side note: the podcast begins with the trio discussing how difficult it is for Scott being a fan of the Bears, Bulls and White Sox. I wish I had the chance to talk about how awesome it is to be a Patriots fan. Seriously, how can you like football if you aren’t? It’s awful.)

As always, you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Audioboom or anywhere else that podcasts are given away for free.

If you enjoy what you hear on this podcast, please rate and review the podcast, as it will help us reach more listeners.

Thanks for listening!

MORE: 2016-17 Season Preview Coverage | Conference Previews | Preview Schedule