Michael Beasley’s legal battle with former agent, AAU coach

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Anyone that follows college basketball even moderately closely can tell you the key words that you will find in every story that breaks about the recruitment of an elite level high schooler — agents, runners, AAU coaches, limitless “funding”, shoe companies.

We saw it with OJ Mayo and Ronald Guillory. We saw it with Josh Nochimson and Nate Miles. It may be a different sport, but we saw it with Josh Luchs as well.

In theory, we all know how it works. People funded by an agency form relationships with the coaches of top AAU programs and their best players, using a limitless supply of cash and gifts to entice and impress the players, the ultimate goal being the commission the agency makes off of those six-year contracts and million dollar endorsement.

But in practice, very few outside observers have a chance to gain a window into the specifics of the process. And that is what makes this story from the Washington Post so interesting. Michael Beasley is currently locked in a legal battle with his former agent Joel Bell and his old AAU coach Curtis Malone. Bell filed a lawsuit against Beasley claiming that the basketball star illegally fired him prior to signing an endorsement deal with Adidas. Beasley countersued Bell and filed a third-party claim against Malone claiming, among other things, that “Bell bankrolled Malone’s nationally recognized DC Assault summer basketball program and that in return Malone felt obliged to steer Beasley … to Bell for professional representation.”

The money blockquote:

Beasley alleges in the suit that Malone “conspired with Bell to drive Beasley to him as a client” and that Bell “improperly subsidized Malone’s DC Assault program, and paid money to Malone ‘on the side’ or ‘under the table,’ in exchange for” Malone advising players such as Beasley to sign with Bell.

One of Beasley’s first requests of Bell, the suit says, was for the agent to quickly secure Beasley a multimillion dollar endorsement contract. Beasley says in the suit that he wanted a contract with Nike, the long-standing leader in the multibillion dollar shoe and sports apparel industry the past 30 years.

But Beasley’s suit claims that Bell “failed to pursue negotiations with Nike based on pecuniary interests that would result from Adidas to [Bell] and Malone.”

Beasley’s suit also alleges a string of illegal benefits provided to him by Bell and Malone. Beasley’s mother, Fatima Smith, received $2,500 for legal bills after she was arrested for driving with a suspended license. When Beasley enrolled at Kansas State, his mother moved with him and not only had her moving expenses paid for, she had her rent taken care of. She also had her car payments paid for. There’s more, and I strongly encourage you to read the article from Steve Yanda and Eric Prisbell.

But frankly, none of this should surprise you. And, for our intents and purposes as college hoops fans, its virtually irrelevant. Kansas State probably won’t be getting into trouble for this. If they do, then we’ll see that 2007-2008 season go out the window. Whoop-dee-do. Dalonte Hill — another former AAU coach with the DC Assault that was quoted in the Washington Post’s piece — may end up in some trouble at Maryland, but its unclear just how much. The report may end up affecting the pipeline he had coming out of DC more than anything.

What we get here is a peak behind the scenes, a open-door look into exactly what the typical relationship is between these elite players and the agents/runners/AAU coaches/shoe companies they are associated with. And, as you might expect, the reason we get that view is a fight over money. Bell invested his money with Malone and believed it was his time to profit off of the (business) relationship he had cultivated with Beasley. The player had other ideas. Bell filed a lawsuit because he was pissed he didn’t get paid. Beasley fired back because he doesn’t want to pay.

And here we are. Throw in Dave Telep’s piece from Tuesday titled the Guide to Dirty Recruiting, and we may never get a clearer picture of just how the finances and the politics of grassroots basketball works.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @ballinisahabit.

Rick Pitino: Louisville ‘just ignored’ in top 25 due of scandal

Rick Pitino
(AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
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Louisville beatdown Saint Louis at the Barclays Center on Sunday night, a 77-57 win that was much closer at halftime than the final score might indicate.

The win moved the Cardinals to 5-0 on the season, and that, in turn, got Louisville into the back end of both top 25 polls.

They’re 24th in the AP Poll and 22nd in the Coaches Poll, but that happened on Monday morning. On Sunday night, Pitino made sure to get a rant in about how this team is viewed and why pundits and voters should overlook the scandal currently plaguing his program.

“I think people are looking at that and they’re not really studying the team,” he said, according to the Louisville Courier-Journal, adding that he thinks the team is “just ignored” because of the accusations leveled by self-described madam Katina Powell in the book she published back in October.

And here’s the thing: he is 100 percent correct. Louisville was overlooked in the preseason because the scandal, when combined with the fact that the Cardinals are integrating so many new pieces into their rotation, made it tough to see how they would be able to compete at a level that we’ve come to expect out of Louisville teams.

I know that because it’s why my colleagues at NBCSports.com, against my wishes, refused to allow me to rank Louisville in the preseason top 25. In other words, I’ve had first-hand interactions with the haters. But if we’re going to be honest here, scandal or no scandal, Louisville probably wasn’t going to find their way into the preseason top 25, not when they had to replace Terry Rozier and Montrezl Harrell.

And scandal or no scandal, no team from outside the top 25 is going to play their way into the top 25 by beating the likes of North Florida and St. Francis (NY) without some shenanigans — like Fred VanVleet getting hurt, like Indiana collapsing, like Arizona and Cal and Notre Dame playing their way out of the top 20 — happening around the country.

So Pitino is right: the scandal probably did have an impact on how his team was viewed in the preseason.

But Pitino the scandal isn’t what kept them out of the top 25 until Monday.

That weak non-conference schedule and roster turnover was why.

And if we’re going to be honest here, it probably should have kept them out for another week.

Brooks’ big game leads No. 15 Oregon over Fresno State 78-73

Dillon Brooks, Torren Jones
AP Photo/Chris Pietsch
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EUGENE, Ore. (AP) Dillon Brooks had 21 points and 10 rebounds and No. 15 Oregon staved off a late rally by Fresno State for a 78-73 victory Monday night.

Chris Boucher and Elgin Cook added 14 points each for the Ducks (6-0), who led 70-52 with 6:35 to play before Marvelle Harris scored 13 points in a 16-2 run by the Bulldogs (5-1) that cut the deficit to four.

A driving layup by Brooks put Oregon up 74-68 with 1:20 left, and the Ducks held on by making four of six free throws in the final 45 seconds.

Harris, who didn’t score until the 12:04 mark of the second half, led Fresno State with 18 points, while Paul Watson added 11 and Torren Jones had 10 points and 11 rebounds.

The Bulldogs won the rebounding battle 41-32 behind Jones and Karachi Edo, who had nine rebounds and 10 points.

Freshman Tyler Dorsey, Oregon’s leading scorer at 15.2 points per game, finished with 12.

The Ducks scored the game’s first 11 points, went up by as many as 14 and took a 37-25 halftime lead. The Ducks did most of the damage from inside the 3-point arc (9 of 10) and at the free throw line, outscoring the Bulldogs 13-5.

Fresno State, meanwhile, missed its first six shots from the field, shot 29.0 percent (9 of 31) and saw its top two scorers, Harris and Cezar Guerrero, held scoreless for the first 20 minutes.

The senior guards came in averaging 20.2 and 13.2 points per game, respectively.


Fresno State: Harris, the preseason choice for Mountain West Conference player of the year, needed one point to crack the Bulldog’s all-time top 10 in scoring. After going scoreless in the first half, he finished with 18 to rank 10th with 1,425, one behind Tod Bernard in ninth place, in 107 career games. . The Bulldogs fell to 2-10 all-time against Oregon. They last time they beat the Ducks, who have won the last five meetings, was in 1995. . Fresno State hasn’t beaten a Top 25 team on the road since 2000.

Oregon: The double-double was the second of the season Brooks and fourth of his career. . The Ducks are 40-2 against nonconference opponents since moving into Matthew Knight Arena five years ago. . The 6-0 start is Oregon’s second in the last nine years. The Ducks started 13-0 two seasons ago.